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MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1728-1739
Abstract:  

These volumes include annotations in "Praxin et Aphorismos" Boerhaave (1738-1739), and lectures on Boerhaave's "Praxis medica" (1728).
Call #:  
Mss.610.B63m
Extent:
3 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1801-1802
Abstract:  

These are 94 pages of notes, by an unknown author, pertaining to the first and second classes of zoology.
Call #:  
Mss.Film.402
Extent:
1 microfilm_reel(s)



BOOK

Title:  
Geometry of complex domains
Creators:
Veblen, Oswald, 1880-1960 | Von Neumann, John, 1903-1957 | Givens, Wallace, 1910-1993 | Taub, A. H., 1911-1999 | Goldstine, Herman H. (Herman Heine), 1913-2004 | Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton, N.J.)
Publication:
The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J, 1955.
Notes:  
Inlcudes photograph of Oswald Veblen. Includes bibliographical references.
Call #:  
511.33 V43g
Extent:
306 leaves in various foliations : illustrations



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1826-1827
Abstract:  

This volume begins with lecture number 23 (1826 December 13) and ends with number 59 (1827 February 21) of Silliman's lectures at Yale College.
Call #:  
Mss.B.M622
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1802
Abstract:  

Hodte i sommeren. Skrivne af B.Heiberg. These are lecture notes on obstetrics taken by Fenger, an unknown student.
Call #:  
Mss.618.2.F35f
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
Circa 1810
Abstract:  

A. Sager's brief notes provide an outline for a course of chemistry lectures, ca.1810. The notes, in Swedish, include sections on electricity and phlogiston.
Call #:  
Mss.540.Sa1
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1857
Abstract:  

Born in Stuttgart in 1792 and educated at the University of Tübingen, Julius Eugen Schlossberger was one of the pioneers of physiological chemistry in Germany. Unorganischen Chemie is a thorough discourse on inorganic chemistry and metallurgy, presumably relating to lectures given at the University of Tübingen, with an extrensive section on the physical properties, chemistry, and analysis of Eisenmetalle ("iron metals"). The volume includes three small drawings of experimental apparatus.
Call #:  
Mss.546.Sch2
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
Circa 1781-1809
Abstract:  

These volumes contain notes from lectures taken by Wistar and lectures given by Wistar. Subjects include bones, teeth, amputation, and midwifery.
Call #:  
Mss.610.4.W76
Extent:
4 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1827-1829
Abstract:  

These classroom notes, taken by an unidentified student, present the state of knowledge in natural philosophy, especially astronomy, during these years. There are mentions of many contemporary scientists, and much on Newton and Newtonian philosophy.
Call #:  
Mss.B.OL5
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
Circa 1777-1837
Abstract:  

These papers include correspondence from over 180 individuals, lecture notes and essays on mathematics, astronomy, and electricity, and his diaries from journeys through Germany (1798) and Switzerland (1802).
Call #:  
Mss.Fiche.8
Extent:
492 microfiche_card(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1822-1823
Abstract:  

Born in Leith, Scotland, in 1774, Robert Jameson was a pillar of the scientific establishment at the University of Edinburgh for over fifty years, and was one of Scotland's most important mineralogists and natural historians. Kept by W. D. Wilson, a student at the University of Edinburgh, this volume includes notes of lectures on zoology and meteorology delivered by Robert Jameson in 1822-1823. Wilson wrote that he omitted the introductory lectures, and added: "I do not mean to fill this book with copious Notes; -- I shall put down merely a few of the general facts, -- and any thing of interest not to be found in the text books of the class."
Call #:  
Mss.504.J23
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1857-1858
Abstract:  

As a junior and senior at Princeton in 1857-1858, John Howard Wurts was enrolled in the two semester sequence of courses on natural philosophy taught by the astronomer Stephen Alexander. The polished version of Wurts' lecture notes provide a detailed record of Alexander's presentation of both statics and the applications of statics, including thebasic principles of natural philosophy, the physical properties of matter, forces, and methodology. The notes are illustrated throughout with finely rendered pencil and ink drawings of physical apparatus and experiments.
Call #:  
Mss.504.W95
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1913-1940
Abstract:  

The bulk of the material in this collection pertains to the years Bazzoni spent at the University of Pennsylvania (BA 1911, PhD 1914). There are three notebooks filled with student lecture notes from the years 1913-1914. Also, a collection of articles Bazzoni wrote while teaching at Pennsylvania, including several memos to the Educational Survey Committee. There is a notebook tracking his experiments while in London at King's College, and copies of two dissertations by students, presumably from the years Bazzoni was at Pennsylvania. Materials from the post-Pennsylvania years is limited to a notebook of Potential Center Displacement of Logger Tests.
Call #:  
Mss.Ms.Coll.70
Extent:
12 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
January 1797 - June 1797
Abstract:  

Louis Hasbrouck was in his last year at Princeton in 1796-1797 when he attended the course of chemistry lectures given by John Maclean. In only his second year at Princeton, Maclean was rapidly becoming known for introducing the latest currents in chemical theory, including the system of Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, and he was one of the first Americans to insist that students take part in active experimentation. Louis Hasbrouck was in his final year at Princeton in 1796-1797 when he attended John Maclean's lectures on chemistry. His notebook from the second half of that course includes a detailed record of the lectures from January 24-March 14 and June 22-24, 1797, covering Maclean's discussion of the chemistry of metals, "chemical combination," combustion, and botanical chemistry. Although his notes are not complete, Hasbrouck was enrolled at a singularly interesting period in the history of American chemistry. This was only the second time that Maclean had offered his course, in which he introduced the new chemical system of Lavoisier, and it includes a relatively complete version of Maclean's most important lecture, "Of combustion." This devastating attack on Joseph Priestley and phlogistic theory appeared in print in 1797 as Two Lectures on Combustion: Supplementary to a Course of Lectures on Chemistry.
Call #:  
Mss.540.H27
Extent:
1 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1935-1937
Abstract:  

These items include notes on "primitive economics" (Incan) for A. Irving Hallowell and from seminars with Linton Satterthwaite (on Mayan architecture), E. B. Howard (on problems of the Clovis site in New Mexico), and others at the University of Pennsylvania. There are also notes taken at the 1936 meeting of the American Anthropological Association of papers by various anthropologists in attendance, including Ruth Benedict, Frederica de Laguna, Waiter Dyk, William N. Fenton, Alfred V. Kidder, David G. Mandelbaum, George P. Murdock, Arthur C. Parker, Elsie Clews Parsons, Gladys A. Reichard, William A. Ritchie, Linton Satterthwaite, Gene Weltfish, and others regarding Cree, Flathead, Iroquois (Haudenosaunee), Kaingang (Southern Brazil), Kiowa, Mayan, Natchez, Navajo, Ojibwa, Pawnee, Pueblos, Sahaptin, Saulteaux, Siouan, Tarascan, Tonawanda (Seneca), Zuni, etc.
Call #:  
Mss.970.1.Si6
Extent:
2 volume(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1745-1878
Abstract:  

The correspondence (1869-1883) is primarily routine business, i.e. navy orders and letters of recommendation, and also includes some personal letters. In addition, there are several notebooks and diaries, including notes from Pennsylvania Hospital clinical lectures, 1867-1869 (2 v.); diaries, 1865-1875 (7 v.); a volume of poetry; and general study notes. There is also early material (1745-1813) on the Cassin family, including a letter of indenture dated 1758.
Call #:  
Mss.B.C274
Extent:
70 item(s)



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1811-1844
Abstract:  

An evolutionist before Darwin, an embryologist, paleontologist, and comparative anatomist, Étienne Geoffroy Saint Hilaire was a Professor of Vertebrate Zoology at the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris for the half century following the Reign of Terror. Following in the footsteps of Lamarck, Geoffroy held tenaciously to a belief in the underlying unity of organismal design, to the great change of being, and the possibility of the transmutation of species in time, amassing evidence for his claims through research in comparative anatomy, paleontology, and embryology. The Geoffroy Collection is comprised of 0.75 linear feet of lecture notes and correspondence relating to Geoffroy's diverse interests in natural history, Egypt, comparative anatomy, analogies, paleontology, and embryology, and it is particularly rich for his studies of teratology. All items are in French.
Call #:  
Mss.B.G287p
Extent:
0.75 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
Circa 1909-1964
Abstract:  

This is a collection of Cope's articles, papers, notes, lectures, notebooks, and some correspondence. There is much on his research pertaining to Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, and other topics in the history of science on which he wrote. The collection includes lecture notes and three bound notebook volumes on mechanics from his study at the University of Berlin under Max Planck from 1912 to 1913. There are 11 additional bound volumes, all relating to physics, including: Minutes of meetings of the Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania (1910-1919), two volumes on the history of physics, and a volume of data on the radiometer as a measurer of electric current. The collection also contains notes on electric circuit theory lectures (1924-1925) by J.R. Carson, notes on lectures on relativity (1921) by Albert Einstein, lectures by W.F.G. Swann (1928), and information about the Pennsylvania Academy of Science, and on radiation (1909). There is significant correspondence from Lionel G. Dixon and Victor Englehardt.
Call #:  
Mss.B.C794
Extent:
7 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
1844-1918
Abstract:  

[The following comprises the original Abstract, which will be significantly revised.] >>> These are notes, sketches, memoranda, etc., made while Lyman directed the geological survey of Japan, 1873-1879, with reports on petroleum resources, copper, coal, iron, and gold mines, oil, mineral springs, and other mineral resources of the Japanese archipelago. There are data on the Japanese, Chinese, Ainu, and French languages, and on Japanese manners and customs, wit and humor, gardening, painting, measurements, swords, etc. Notes and data on the life, travels, and publications of Bernard Varenius. Notes collected for Lyman's Vegetarian Diet and Dishes. Materials on the geology of New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Iowa, Colorado, New Mexico, and West Virginia; and on coal and iron fields in those states and elsewhere. Manuscripts of articles on instruments for boring wells, theodolites for mining and civil engineers, other surveying instruments, etc. >>> Of particular note is Lyman's period of study in Europe, where he attended the Imperial School of Mines in Paris, France (1859-1861), and the Royal Academy of Mines, Freiberg, Germany (1861-1862). There are about eleven notebooks for this period, written in English, French, and German, that contain: lecture notes, travel observations, comments on geology, mines and mining, railroads, with sketches of machinery, etc. There are a large number of letters (ca. 7,000 items), 1850-1917, from and to Lyman, on personal and business affairs.
Call #:  
Mss.B.L982
Extent:
49 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Dates:
Circa 1930s-1980s
Abstract:  

This diverse collection includes correspondence, field notes, lecture and meeting notes, publication material, drawings, and lantern slides. It documents Weber's professional career as an internationally known myrmecologist, or ant scientist, and his wider ranging interests in entomology and ecology. There are class and lab notes for his educational period at Harvard University (A.M. 1933; Ph.D. 1935), and substantial documentation on his primary academic career at Swarthmore College (1947-1974; includes teaching records, data on the Biology Dept. and the College). His field notes, 1930s-1970s (ca. 3 lin. ft.), contain detailed observations of the many scientific expeditions he was a member of, including trips to: West Indies, 1933-1936; Colombia, 1938; Sudan, Uganda, and Kenya, 1939. He also participated in numerous American Museum of Natural History expeditions: Central Africa, 1948; Middle East, 1950, 1952; and Tropical America, 1954. There are data for his time as visiting professor at the University of Baghdad, Iraq, 1950-1952, and his period as Scientific Attaché, Buenos Aires, for the U. S. Dept. of State, 1960-1962. Weber's contributions to polar scientific studies can be studied through his files of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Polar Research, 1958-1960 (he was on the panel on biological and medical science), as well as many numerous miscellaneous files on polar research. There is substantial material on the Entomological Society of America, and on such local ecological groups as the Chester-Ridley-Crum Watersheds Assoc., Delaware County, Pennsylvania.
Call #:  
Mss.Ms.Coll.12
Extent:
22 Linear feet



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