American Philosophical Society
Member History

Results:  10 ItemsModify Search | New Search
Page: 1Reset Page
Residency
International (2)
Resident (8)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
1Name:  Dr. Elizabeth Cropper
 Institution:  National Gallery of Art
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Elizabeth Cropper received her B.A. with honors from Cambridge University, England, and her Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College. Before joining The Johns Hopkins University as professor in 1985, she was a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. In 2000 she succeeded Henry Millon as Dean of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, one of the world's leading centers for advanced research in the history of art. In 2019 it was announced that she would retire from her role as dean in 2020. In addition to professorships at Cambridge University and CASVA, her visiting appointments include tenures as directeur d'Etudes Associé at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Science Sociales, Paris (1990-1991 and 1997); as Samuel H. Kress Fellow, CASVA, National Gallery of Art (1984-1985); and as professor at the Collège de France in 1996. Among Dr. Cropper's postdoctoral research awards are positions as visiting scholar and fellow at the Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence; Andrew W. Mellon Professor at CASVA; and visiting member, School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her publications include Pontormo: Portrait of a Halberdier (1997), Nicolas Poussin: Friendship and the Love of Painting, with Charles Dempsey (1996); and The Domenichino Affair (2005).
 
2Name:  Dr. Charles Till Davis
 Institution:  Tulane University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  4/10/98
   
3Name:  Dr. Charles G. Dempsey
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Charles Dempsey's work is distinguished by superlative critical engagement with issues central to the history of Renaissance and Baroque art. He has written pivotal books on the beginnings of the Baroque style and on Botticelli's Primavera. Deeply imbued with the classical heritage and equally immersed in cultures of the arts he studies, he is a humanist faithful to the past and concerned for the present. It was he who during the war in Yugoslavia inspired the conference on that land's contributions to the Renaissance in the hope of helping protect the art, and he who with a colleague has made his department at Johns Hopkins University one of the best in the land. A member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1993), Dr. Dempsey was Professor of Italian Renaissance and Baroque Art at Johns Hopkins since 1980, becoming emeritus in 2007. He earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1963.
 
4Name:  Dr. J. D. Hawkins
 Institution:  School of Oriental and African Languages, University of London
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
John David Hawkins received an M.A. at Oxford University in 1965. He began his career at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London as a research fellow in 1964 and has been Professor of Ancient Anatolian Languages since 1993. At the beginning of the 20th century next to nothing was known about the eight or so different languages of the Hittite archives. Now we can read and understand most of the texts. The history of Anatolia, 1000-700 B.C., used to be known only from the point of view of the Assyrians (the future conquerors). Now that the local sources have been opened up in all their richness, everything is changed. These are discoveries that match in brilliance the most far-reaching scientific accomplishments in scholarly history, and in large measure they are due to David Hawkins and to his work of thirty years. J. D. Hawkins in the author of (with S. Dalley and C.B.F. Walker) Old Babylonian Tablets from Tell al-Rimah (1976); The Hieroglyphic Inscription of the Sacred Pool Complex at Bogazköy-Hattusa (1995); Corpus of Hieroglyphic Luwian Inscriptions (4 volumes, 1998). He was the editor of IRAQ (Journal of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq) from 1976-1995. J. D. Hawkins served as honorary secretary for the British School of Archaeology in Iraq from 1976-85. He is a member of the British Academy and was elected a foreign member of the American Philosophical Society in 1998.
 
5Name:  Dr. Albert Henrichs
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1942
 Death Date:  April 16, 2017
   
 
Through his work in papyrology, Albert Henrichs made himself one of the most original and versatile scholars in Classics. His most signal and seminal contributions were in the field of religious thought, ranging from an edition of magical texts to new interpretations of religious tenets of leading Sophists, from a commentary on the book of Job to a text of Mani. His research led to innumerable insights into Greek tragedy and comedy, into Homer and into Greek history (where his work on the Theramenes papyrus deserves special mention). Dr. Henrichs has written on mythography and on rhetoric; in short, there is hardly a field of Greek (and related) studies that has not been enriched by the profound questions he asked and the novel answers at which he had arrived. A native of Cologne, Germany, Dr. Henrichs was Eliot Professor of Greek at Harvard University from 1984 to 2017. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1985); the American Philological Association; l'Association Internationale de papyrologues; and the Egypt Exploration Society. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1998. Dr. Henrichs died April16, 2017, at age 74 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
6Name:  Dr. Alexander Jones
 Institution:  Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1960
   
 
Alexander Jones is Professor of the History of the Exact Sciences in Antiquity at New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. In 2017 he became the Leon Levy Director at the Institute. He studies the history of the mathematical and physical sciences in antiquity, particularly Greco-Roman and Babylonian astronomy; Greco-Roman physical and mathematical sciences; and scientific texts on papyri. He is the author of five books, including Pappus of Alexandria, Book 7 (2 volumes, 1986), and about forty articles. His edition of the Oxyrhynchus astronomical and astrological papyri, the largest collection ever published, with translation and full technical commentary, is a landmark, entirely transforming the modern study of ancient astronomy and astrology and worthy to stand beside O. Neugebauer's "Astronomical Cuneiform Texts" (1955) and A.J. Sachs's and H. Hunger's "Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia" (1988). A graduate of Brown University (Ph.D., 1985), he served on the University of Toronto faculty from 1992-2008.
 
7Name:  Dr. Patrick Vinton Kirch
 Institution:  University of Hawai'I at Manoa; University of California, Berkeley & P.A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Unsurpassed as a prehistorian of the Pacific, Patrick Kirch was curator of the P. A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology and Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is now Chancellor's Professor Emeritus and Professor of the Graduate School, Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology and Integrative Biology Emeritus. In 2019 he moved to the University of Hawai'i as a professor of anthropology. In a succession of outstanding contributions, he has shown how Pacific islanders have made changing adaptations to life in the islands over 3,000 years, exemplifying regional archaeology at its best and greatly clarifying our knowledge of the important Lapita cultural horizon of the first and second millennia BC. His book The Wet and the Dry makes a convincing case for recognizing the importance of intensification of agriculture in connection with shifting cultivation and tree crops as well as through irrigation in environments where irrigation is not feasible. He also demonstrates that, contrary to widely held theory, irrigation systems do not require centralized state authority for their development, maintenance, and management. Dr. Kirch's intellectual interests are broad, incorporating geology, botany, and cultural anthropology into his archaeological research. A native of Hawaii, Dr. Kirch has published numerous other works relating to the Pacific, including Marine Explorations in Prehistoric Hawaii (1979), Tikopia: The Prehistory and Ecology of a Polynesian Outlier (1982); The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms (1984); and Feathered Gods and Fishhooks: An Introduction to Hawaiian Archaeology Prehistory (1985). He holds a Ph.D. from Yale University (1975).
 
8Name:  Dr. Michael C. J. Putnam
 Institution:  Brown University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1933
   
 
Michael Putnam is W. Duncan MacMillan Professor of Classics and Professor of Comparative Literature, emeritus, at Brown University, where he has taught since 1960. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University (1959) and an honorary Ll. D from Lawrence University (1985). Putnam was acting director of the Center for Hellenic Studies (1961-62) and served as one of its Senior Fellows (1971-1986). He was Townsend Professor of Classics at Cornell University in 1985 and inaugurated the Townsend Lectures. For 1987-88 he was a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, and for 1994-95 a Visiting Scholar for Phi Beta Kappa. In 2004 he gave the Martin Classical Lectures at Oberlin College and in 2009 inaugurated the Amsterdam Virgil Lectures at the University of Amsterdam. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences as well as the American Philological Association, now the Society for Classical Studies, of which he was director (1972-73), president (1982), delegate to the American Council of Learned Societies (1984-87), financial trustee (1997-2004), and co-chair of its Gateway Campaign Committee (2005-12). He received the Society's Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit in 1971 and its Distinguished Service Award in 2013. He has had a long association with the American Academy in Rome from which he received the Rome Prize (1963-4) and served as Mellon professor-in-charge of the Classical School (1989-9) and as trustee from 1991 to 2010 when he became Life Trustee. He received the Academy's Centennial Medal in 2009 and Trustees Medal in 2010. In 2019 he received the Arete Award from the Padeia Institute. He holds memberships in the Accademia Nazionale Virgiliana, and the Vergilian Society of America from which he received the McKay Prize in 2009 and which he served as Trustee from 2013-16. He was sole trustee of Lowell Observatory from 1967-87 and continues to serve on its board of advisors. From 1997-2014 he was a member of the Selections Committee of Fogg Museum of Art, and trustee of Bay Chamber Concerts from 1972-88 and 2010-16. He is the author of a number of books, including The Poetry of the Aeneid (1965); Virgil's Pastoral Art (1970); Tibullus: A Commentary (1973); Virgil's Poem of the Earth (1979); Essays on Latin Lyric, Elegy, and Epic (1982); Artifices of Eternity: Horace's Fourth Book of Odes (1986); Virgil's Aeneid: Interpretation and Influence (1995); Virgil's Epic Designs: Ekphrasis in the Aeneid (1998); Horace's Carmen Saeculare: Ritual Magic and the Poet's Art (2000); Maffeo Vegio: Short Epics (2004); Poetic Interplay: Catullus and Horace (2006); Jacopo Sannazaro: The Latin Poetry (2009); The Humanness of Heroes: Studies in the Conclusion of Virgil's Aeneid (2011); (with. Rodney Dennis): The Complete Poems of Tibullus: A En Face Edition (2012). He is co-editor of The Virgilian Tradition (2008) and of A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and its Tradition (2010). He has held Guggenheim, ACLS and NEH fellowships. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1998.
 
9Name:  Dr. Richard Taruskin
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Richard Taruskin is Class of 1955 Professor of Music Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. A prodigiously talented musician-scholar, he has produced masterful musicological detective work on matters ranging from the 15th century Burgundians to the late 20th century Soviets. Furthermore, he is a world-class choral conductor, specializing in performances of early music. His talents are often on display in literary journals, where a sharp mind and fluent pen set him above other musician-critics. In university seminars, dealing with the cutting edge of his discipline, he is a brilliant analyst and genial speaker; time and again, and with rare verbal felicity, he has come to eminently logical conclusions that have evaded others. Dr. Taruskin received his Ph.D. in 1975 from Columbia University, where he also taught from 1973-86. His published works include Opera and Drama in Russia (1981); Music in the Western World (1984); Antoine Busnoys: The Latin Texted Works (Masters of the Renaissance) (1989); Mussorgsky: Eight Essays and an Epilogue (1993); Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions (1995); and Text and Act: Essays on Music and Performance (1995). In 2017 he won the prestigious Kyoto Prize.
 
10Name:  Dr. Tzvetan Todorov
 Institution:  CNRS, Paris
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402. Criticism: Arts and Letters
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1939
 Death Date:  February 7, 2017
   
 
Tzvetan Todorov was a Bulgarian born historian, cultural critic and essayist who lived in France from 1963 until his death February 7, 2017, in Paris at age 77. After his pioneering early work on literary theory, he chose to explore issues of human diversity, of universalism vs. relativism and of human behavior in extreme situations. He did this with erudition, balance, and a sense of compassion - not to mention extraordinary productivity. Dr. Todorov published more than 30 books, including The Poetics of Prose (1971), Introduction to Poetics (1981), The Conquest of America (1982), Mikhail Bakhtin: The Dialogical Principle (1984), Facing the Extreme: Moral Life in the Concentration Camps (1991), On Human Diversity (1993), Hope and Memory (2000), and Imperfect Garden: The Legacy of Humanism (2002). He was a member of the Conseil National des Programmes au Ministère de l'Education Nationale and has served as visiting professor at several universities, including Harvard, Yale, Columbia and the University of California, Berkeley. His honors include the prizes Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1991), Charles Veillon (1998), Nonino (2002), Spinoza (2004), Grinzane Cavour (2007) and Prince of Asturias (2008); he also was an Officer of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. He was a Doctor honoris causa of the Universities of Sofia, Liège, Mannheim and the American University in Paris, a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur and an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr. Todorov held the title of Directeur de recherches honoraire at CNRS, Paris at the time of his death.
 
Election Year
1998 (10)