American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Resident (3)
Class
Subdivision
405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century[X]
1Name:  Dr. Charles Till Davis
 Institution:  Tulane University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  4/10/98
   
2Name:  Dr. Albert Henrichs
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1942
 Death Date:  April 16, 2017
   
 
Through his work in papyrology, Albert Henrichs made himself one of the most original and versatile scholars in Classics. His most signal and seminal contributions were in the field of religious thought, ranging from an edition of magical texts to new interpretations of religious tenets of leading Sophists, from a commentary on the book of Job to a text of Mani. His research led to innumerable insights into Greek tragedy and comedy, into Homer and into Greek history (where his work on the Theramenes papyrus deserves special mention). Dr. Henrichs has written on mythography and on rhetoric; in short, there is hardly a field of Greek (and related) studies that has not been enriched by the profound questions he asked and the novel answers at which he had arrived. A native of Cologne, Germany, Dr. Henrichs was Eliot Professor of Greek at Harvard University from 1984 to 2017. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1985); the American Philological Association; l'Association Internationale de papyrologues; and the Egypt Exploration Society. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1998. Dr. Henrichs died April16, 2017, at age 74 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
3Name:  Dr. Michael C. J. Putnam
 Institution:  Brown University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1933
   
 
Michael Putnam is W. Duncan MacMillan Professor of Classics and Professor of Comparative Literature, emeritus, at Brown University, where he has taught since 1960. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University (1959) and an honorary Ll. D from Lawrence University (1985). Putnam was acting director of the Center for Hellenic Studies (1961-62) and served as one of its Senior Fellows (1971-1986). He was Townsend Professor of Classics at Cornell University in 1985 and inaugurated the Townsend Lectures. For 1987-88 he was a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, and for 1994-95 a Visiting Scholar for Phi Beta Kappa. In 2004 he gave the Martin Classical Lectures at Oberlin College and in 2009 inaugurated the Amsterdam Virgil Lectures at the University of Amsterdam. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences as well as the American Philological Association, now the Society for Classical Studies, of which he was director (1972-73), president (1982), delegate to the American Council of Learned Societies (1984-87), financial trustee (1997-2004), and co-chair of its Gateway Campaign Committee (2005-12). He received the Society's Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit in 1971 and its Distinguished Service Award in 2013. He has had a long association with the American Academy in Rome from which he received the Rome Prize (1963-4) and served as Mellon professor-in-charge of the Classical School (1989-9) and as trustee from 1991 to 2010 when he became Life Trustee. He received the Academy's Centennial Medal in 2009 and Trustees Medal in 2010. In 2019 he received the Arete Award from the Padeia Institute. He holds memberships in the Accademia Nazionale Virgiliana, and the Vergilian Society of America from which he received the McKay Prize in 2009 and which he served as Trustee from 2013-16. He was sole trustee of Lowell Observatory from 1967-87 and continues to serve on its board of advisors. From 1997-2014 he was a member of the Selections Committee of Fogg Museum of Art, and trustee of Bay Chamber Concerts from 1972-88 and 2010-16. He is the author of a number of books, including The Poetry of the Aeneid (1965); Virgil's Pastoral Art (1970); Tibullus: A Commentary (1973); Virgil's Poem of the Earth (1979); Essays on Latin Lyric, Elegy, and Epic (1982); Artifices of Eternity: Horace's Fourth Book of Odes (1986); Virgil's Aeneid: Interpretation and Influence (1995); Virgil's Epic Designs: Ekphrasis in the Aeneid (1998); Horace's Carmen Saeculare: Ritual Magic and the Poet's Art (2000); Maffeo Vegio: Short Epics (2004); Poetic Interplay: Catullus and Horace (2006); Jacopo Sannazaro: The Latin Poetry (2009); The Humanness of Heroes: Studies in the Conclusion of Virgil's Aeneid (2011); (with. Rodney Dennis): The Complete Poems of Tibullus: A En Face Edition (2012). He is co-editor of The Virgilian Tradition (2008) and of A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and its Tradition (2010). He has held Guggenheim, ACLS and NEH fellowships. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1998.
 
Election Year
1998 (3)