American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
International (2)
Resident (2)
Class
Subdivision
204. Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and Immunology[X]
1Name:  Dr. Harald zur Hausen
 Institution:  German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum)
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  204. Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and Immunology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Harald zur Hausen is a world renowned virologist who has made pioneering discoveries on viruses that cause human tumors. He made major contributions to our knowledge of the Epstein-Barr virus, the agent involved in Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. His most important discovery, for which he was awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine, is the causative role of papillomaviruses in human anogenital cancer. His work has far-reaching implications for human health and well-being and provides the basis for antiviral vaccines that could prevent some of the most common human malignancies. As Director of the German Cancer Research Center since 1983, Dr. zur Hausen has had a major influence on the organization, development and support of science. He has turned this institution into a leading center for biological and clinical research. A graduate of the University of Dusseldorf (M.D., 1960), Dr. zur Hausen is a member of the European Molecular Biology Organization (1976); the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences (1986); the German Academy of Natural Sciences (1986); the Academia Europaea (1990); the Polish Academy of Sciences (foreign member) (1991); and the Venezuelan National Academy of Medicine (1993).
 
2Name:  Dr. Ho-Wang Lee
 Institution:  National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Korea
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  204. Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and Immunology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1928
   
 
As a medical virologist, Ho-Wang Lee studied Japanese encephalitis (JE) and Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF), now called Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The first of these was the success of tissue culture of JE virus, immune mechanism of JE and overwintering mechanisms of JE virus in Korea from 1955-68. The second of these was the isolation of etiologic agents, epidemiology and prevention of HFRS from 1969-o 2004. He isolated etiologic agents of HFRS from Apodemus mice and urban rats and named the virus Hantaan and Seoul in 1976 and 1980, respectively. He elucidated epizootiology and epidemiology of HFRS in 1979-85. Hantaan virus is the origin of genus Hantavirus and he proved world-wide distribution of hantaviruses from 1977-2000. In 1990, he and his colleagues developed a simple rapid diagnostic kit and an inactivated vaccine against HFRS. This vaccine was distributed in Asia and thereafter the number of HFRS patients decreased significantly.
 
3Name:  Dr. John Nichols Loeb
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  204. Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and Immunology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
John N. Loeb is Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Special Lecturer in Medicine at Columbia University. He graduated summa cum laude from both Harvard College and Harvard Medical School and after a year of internship at the Massachusetts General Hospital moved to New York City in 1962 for a year as an assistant resident on the Medical Service of the Presbyterian Hospital. After two years as a Research Associate with Gordon M. Tomkins in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, he returned to New York as Chief Resident in Medicine at the Presbyterian Hospital and Instructor in Medicine at the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University. He has remained affiliated with both institutions, where since 2005 he has been Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Special Lecturer in Medicine at Columbia University and continues as an Attending Physician at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Loeb's research was principally focused on mechanisms of hormone action, the physical chemistry of receptor-ligand interactions and their quantitative relationship to biological response, and the regulation of glucose and monovalent cation transport. In pursuing these studies he chose to maintain only a small laboratory so that he could devote substantial time himself to benchwork, and his work was continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health from 1967 to 1999, support for the final ten years coming from an NIH MERIT award. From 1997 until 2003 he served as Associate Chairman for Research in the Department of Medicine and, from 2003 until his retirement, as Vice Chairman for Academic Affairs. Throughout his career Dr. Loeb has had an abiding interest in teaching both medical students and house staff, and in particular in bedside teaching. He has received numerous awards as a teacher at Columbia and additionally has devoted substantial time to teaching abroad. He received a Distinguished Service Award from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 2007. Major non-scientific interests include nineteenth-century English and French literature and playing chamber music. Dr. Loeb was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1998.
 
4Name:  Dr. Francis D. Moore
 Institution:  Harvard Medical School & Brigham & Women's Hospital
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  204. Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and Immunology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1913
 Death Date:  November 24, 2001
   
Election Year
1998 (4)