American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
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Resident (28)
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4. Humanities (40)
Subdivision
401. Archaeology[X]
 Name:  Dr. Robert McC. Adams
 Institution:  University of California, San Diego & Smithsonian Institution & University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  1974
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  January 27, 2018
   
 
Robert Adams was an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California at San Diego at the time of his death on January 27, 2018, at age 91. He was also Director Emeritus of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago and Secretary Emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution. Educated at the University of Chicago, he had a long-standing interest in the environmental, agricultural and urban history of the Middle East. Dr. Adams' conducted extensive field research from the mid-1950s through the late 1970s in southern Iraq, southwestern Iran, Syria and Saudi Arabia. This work, on which he has published extensively, sought to identify long-term patterns of change extending over the last six millennia. Another field of research interest and publication involves the contexts and history of technological change, concentrating on the last five centuries or so in western Europe and the United States. In 1996 he wrote Paths of Fire: An Anthropologist's Inquiry Into Western Technology, which deals with how technology comes about and why or why not it has an impact on mankind. Dr. Adams served as Editor of Trends in American and German Higher Education (2002), which stems from his involvement in a comparison of graduate education and research in the United States and Germany. Robert Adams was the recipient of the 1996 Distinguished Service Award from the Society for American Archaeology, the 2000 Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal from the University of Pennsylvania Museum, the 2002 Gold Medal from the American Institute of Archaeology, and the 2003 Field Museum Award of Merit. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1974.
 
 Name:  Dr. George F. Bass
 Institution:  Texas A & M University
 Year Elected:  1989
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  March 2, 2021
   
 
George F. Bass graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with an M.A. in Near Eastern archaeology and attended the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. From 1957 to 1959 he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, and then began doctoral studies in classical archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1960 he learned to dive so that he could direct the first archaeological excavation of an ancient shipwreck, a Bronze Age wreck off Turkey. While excavating Byzantine shipwrecks off Turkey, Dr. Bass developed a submersible decompression chamber, a method of mapping under water by stereo-photogrammetry, and a two-person submarine, the Asherah, which was launched in 1964. That same year, he joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty. In 1967 his team was the first to locate an ancient wreck with sonar. In 1968 and 1971, he returned to land excavations in Greece and Italy. In 1973, Dr. Bass founded the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, which in 1976 affiliated with Texas A&M University, where, until his retirement in 2000, he was the George T. and Gladys H. Abell Distinguished Professor of Nautical Archaeology. He also held the George O. Yamini Family Chair. He is currently Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Texas A & M. The Institute conducts research on four continents, but Dr. Bass concentrates on Mediterranean sites from the Bronze Age though Byzantine times. Dr. Bass has received a National Medal of Science, the Archaeological Institute of America's Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement, the Bandelier Award from the Institute of Nautical Archaeology which accompanied a lectureship established in his name at the Archaeological Institute of America, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Explorers Club, the J.C. Harrington Medal from the Society for Historical Archaeology, the National Geographic Society's La Gorce Medal, and one of its fifteen Centennial Awards. Dr. Bass holds honorary doctorates from Boghaziçi University in Istanbul and the University of Liverpool. He is also an honorary citizen of Bodrum, Turkey. Dr. Bass was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1989. He died on March 2, 2021.
 
 Name:  Dr. Hans Belting
 Institution:  Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften, Vienna
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Hans Belting is perhaps Germany's most creative art historian. In his College Art Association citation he is described as "the most influential scholar of medieval art of his generation," having made "fundamental contributions to the history of Byzantine wall painting and manuscript illumination, Carolingian art in Rome and Gaul, Italian Trecento mural decoration and early Flemish panel painting." His many books are based on a wide spectrum of methods: traditional style and iconographic analysis, reception theory, archaeological and anthropological techniques and the critique of patronage. But he has also contributed powerfully to contemporary theory in the discipline, particularly in The End of the History of Art, and to the history and criticism of contemporary art. Dr. Belting's other published works include Likeness and Presence: A History of the Image Before the Era of Art (1984); The Germans and Their Art: A Troublesome Relationship (1998); The Invisible Masterpiece: The Modern Myths of Art (2001); and Hieronymus Bosch: The Garden of Earthly Delights (2002). Formerly the Mary Jane Crowe Professor at Northwestern University and the director of the Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften in Vienna, Dr. Belting is a member of the Medieval Academy of America; the American Academy of Arts & Sciences; the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften; and the Academia Europaea. He received his Ph.D. from Mainz University in 1959.
 
 Name:  Professor Paul Bernard
 Institution:  L'Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris
 Year Elected:  2001
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  December 1, 2015
   
 
Paul Bernard was a member of the Academy of Inscriptions and Fine Letters (Institute of France, Paris) since 1992. After studies in Paris (Ecole Normale Supérieure, Sorbonne), he received archaeological training at the French School in Athens (1958-1961) and then became a member of the French Institute of Archaeology in Beirut (1961-1965). He quickly specialized in the archaeology and history of Hellenism east of the Mediterranean shores. In 1965, Professor Bernard became director of the French archaeological mission in Afghanistan and, until 1978, he headed the excavations, by a French team, of a Greek colonial city in Northern Afghanistan at the site, now completely plundered, of Aï Khanum. Upon his return to France, he taught graduate and postgraduate courses at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (Sorbonne) on the history of Hellenism in the Orient. He was an associate member of the Italian Academia dei Lincei and of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2001. Paul Bernard died December 1, 2015, at the age of 86, in Paris, France.
 
 Name:  Dr. R. Howard Bloch
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
A native of North Carolina, raised in New York, R. Howard Bloch attended Amherst College and Stanford University. He has taught at the State University of New York at Buffalo, University of California Berkeley, Columbia, and Yale University, where he is currently Sterling Professor of French and Chair of the Humanities Program. R. Howard Bloch has written numerous books and articles on medieval language and literature, law, family structure, economic and social history, visual culture, as well as on the history of medieval studies in the nineteenth century. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, an Officer in the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, a recipient of the Lowell and the Scaglione Prizes of the Modern Language Association, and a medalist of the Collège de France.
 
 Name:  Dr. Phyllis Pray Bober
 Institution:  Bryn Mawr College
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  June 1, 2002
   
 Name:  Dr. Larissa Bonfante
 Institution:  New York University
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  August 23, 2019
   
 
Larissa Bonfante was Professor of Classics at New York University (1963-2006). Born in Italy, she came with her family to the United States as a child by way of Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. She held a BA from Barnard College, an M.A. in Classics from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in Art History and Archaeology from Columbia University, with Otto Brendel as dissertation adviser. Her first published article was "Emperor, God and Man: Julian the Apostate and Ammianus Marcellinus," followed by Etruscan Dress (1975). Further work on ancient dress, originally inspired by the works of Margarete Bieber, included an NEH Summer Seminar on the Symbolism of Roman Costume (1988), and publications on the Roman triumph, and nudity as a costume in classical art. Brendel’s statement, "we take the Greeks as our model, forgetting that they did everything differently from everyone else," helped direct her focus on the non-Greeks of the classical world, for example in The Etruscan Language, written with her father, the Indo-Europeanist Giuliano Bonfante. Bonfante was a member of the German Archaeological Institute, the Istituto di Studi Etruschi ed Italici, founder and President of its US Section, and co-editor of Etruscan News. She was Visiting Member of the Institute for Advanced Study in 1980, received teaching awards at New York University for her work with undergraduates, and the 2007 Gold Medal for Archaeological Achievement from the Archaeological Institute of America. She delivered the Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series in 2006-07 and the AIA Norton Lecturesship in 2007-08. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2009. Larissa Bonfante died August 23, 2019 in New York, New York at the age of 88.
 
 Name:  Dr. Robert J. Braidwood
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  1966
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1907
 Death Date:  January 15, 2003
   
 Name:  Dr. Claude Cahen
 Institution:  University of Paris
 Year Elected:  1983
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1909
 Death Date:  11/18/91
   
 Name:  Professor Halet Çambel
 Institution:  Istanbul University
 Year Elected:  1979
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1916
 Death Date:  January 12, 2014
   
 
An eminent scholar and expert in the archaeology of the Anatolian Peninsula, Halet Çambel was born in Germany in 1916. The daughter of an old and distinguished Ottoman family, she received her Ph.D. from Istanbul University in 1945 and went on to found the chair of prehistoric archaeology at Istanbul University, where she taught and inspired generations of students. Renowned for conducting rescue excavations of endangered heritage sites, Dr. Çambel introduced stone restoration techniques and ensured proper conservation of significant cultural heritage in Turkey. She was instrumental in protecting a village of unique Turkish houses and opened an Art and Culture House where concerts, exhibitions and other cultural activities take place. Halet Çambel's meticulous scholarship, commitment to international collaboration and enthusiasm for innovative research are praised both in Turkey and in the wider international community. Her numerous publications, television programs, documentaries, and the first open-air museum of antiquities at the Karatepe-Aslanta site are among her contributions to knowledge of and accessibility to the civilizations and historical riches of Turkey. Among Dr. Çambel's many awards is the Prince Claus Award honoring her dedicated scholarship and her role in expanding the possibilities for interaction between people and their cultural heritage. Halet Çambel died January 12, 2014, at the age of 97 at her home in Instanbul.
 
 Name:  Dr. William Coleman
 Year Elected:  1988
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1934
 Death Date:  ././88
   
 Name:  Dr. Elizabeth Cropper
 Institution:  National Gallery of Art
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Elizabeth Cropper received her B.A. with honors from Cambridge University, England, and her Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College. Before joining The Johns Hopkins University as professor in 1985, she was a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. In 2000 she succeeded Henry Millon as Dean of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, one of the world's leading centers for advanced research in the history of art. In 2019 it was announced that she would retire from her role as dean in 2020. In addition to professorships at Cambridge University and CASVA, her visiting appointments include tenures as directeur d'Etudes Associé at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Science Sociales, Paris (1990-1991 and 1997); as Samuel H. Kress Fellow, CASVA, National Gallery of Art (1984-1985); and as professor at the Collège de France in 1996. Among Dr. Cropper's postdoctoral research awards are positions as visiting scholar and fellow at the Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence; Andrew W. Mellon Professor at CASVA; and visiting member, School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her publications include Pontormo: Portrait of a Halberdier (1997), Nicolas Poussin: Friendship and the Love of Painting, with Charles Dempsey (1996); and The Domenichino Affair (2005).
 
 Name:  Dr. Charles G. Dempsey
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1937
 Death Date:  February 22, 2022
   
 
Charles Dempsey's work is distinguished by superlative critical engagement with issues central to the history of Renaissance and Baroque art. He has written pivotal books on the beginnings of the Baroque style and on Botticelli's Primavera. Deeply imbued with the classical heritage and equally immersed in cultures of the arts he studies, he is a humanist faithful to the past and concerned for the present. It was he who during the war in Yugoslavia inspired the conference on that land's contributions to the Renaissance in the hope of helping protect the art, and he who with a colleague has made his department at Johns Hopkins University one of the best in the land. A member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1993), Dr. Dempsey was Professor of Italian Renaissance and Baroque Art at Johns Hopkins since 1980, becoming emeritus in 2007. He earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1963.
 
 Name:  Dr. M. Alison Frantz
 Institution:  American School of Classical Studies
 Year Elected:  1973
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1903
 Death Date:  2/1/95
   
 Name:  Dr. Gilberto deMello Freyre
 Year Elected:  1962
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1900
 Death Date:  7/18/87
   
 Name:  Dr. Crawford H. Greenewalt
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  1987
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1937
 Death Date:  May 4, 2012
   
 
Crawford H. Greenewalt, Jr. was a Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley from 1978 until his death in 2012. He was also the longtime leader of the Harvard-Cornell archaeological expedition to Sardis, serving as its director from 1976-2008. His skill and an unusual ability to work effectively under difficult field conditions enabled Dr. Greenewalt to become one of the most productive archaeologists in the eastern Mediterranean area. The importance of Sardis - from the pages of Herodotus to the history of the Byzantine empire - makes his work important and interesting to students of many fields. Dr. Greenewalt was the author of detailed annual reports on excavations at Sardis as well as articles and works such as Ritual Dinners in Early Historic Sardis (1978). Both to technical scholars in the discipline and to "buffs," his lucid presentation of data, combined with the personal qualities of restraint and modesty, has made classical archaeology a vital intellectual force. He was awarded the Archaeological Institute of America's Bandelier Award for Public Service to Archaeology in 2012. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1987. Crawford H. Greenewalt, Jr., died May 4, 2012, at the age of 74 in Hockessin, Delaware.
 
 Name:  Dr. Evelyn B. Harrison
 Institution:  Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
 Year Elected:  1979
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  November 3, 2012
   
 
Evelyn Byrd Harrison was one of the greatest scholars of our time in the field of Greek sculpture. She earned her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1952 and taught classics at the University of Cincinnati before joining the faculty at Columbia in 1955. In 1970 she was named professor of art and archaeology at Princeton University, becoming the first woman to be appointed full professor in the department. In 1974 she moved to New York University's Institute of Fine Arts as Professor of the History of Fine Arts. She was Edith Kitzmiller Professor Emerita of the History of Fine Arts and Adjunct Professor at the time of her death on November 3, 2012. She died at home in New York City at the age of 92. Dr. Harrison's publications include The Athenian Agora I: Portrait Sculpture (1953) and Achaic and Archaistic Sculpture (1965). She was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as the Archaeological Institute of America's Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement (1992). When she discussed a well-known piece of Greek sculpture, you felt as though you were seeing it for the first time.
 
 Name:  Dr. David Herlihy
 Institution:  Brown University
 Year Elected:  1990
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1930
 Death Date:  2/21/91
   
 Name:  Dr. Frederic Lawrence Holmes
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  March 27, 2003
   
 Name:  Dr. Elfriede Regina (Kezia) Knauer
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  June 7, 2010
   
 
Elfriede Knauer has an incredible range of knowledge in the ancient (and even somewhat modern) art world and history. She has travelled well beyond the normal compass of the archaeologist; she is expert in the culture of China, the Russian steppes, Persia and Iran and the ancient Greek and Roman world. She wrote a book on the Silk Road, which she has personally travelled. Dr. Knauer has written on such a variety of subjects that only a perusal of the titles of her publications can give an idea of what this scholar can control. Born in Germany, Dr. Knauer earned her Ph.D. from Frankfurt University and is currently a Consulting Scholar in the Mediterranean Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She is a member of the Archaeological Institute of America and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1999.
 
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