American Philosophical Society
Member History

Results:  45 ItemsModify Search | New Search
Page: 1 2 3  NextReset Page
Residency
International (8)
Resident (37)
 Name:  Dr. Teodolinda Barolini
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Teodolinda Barolini is one of the leading Dante scholars of our time, perhaps best known for her book The Undivine 'Comedy': Detheologizing Dante, which moves beyond Dante's own determination of the reader's experience to search for the poet's real narrative techniques. She was awarded the Howard R. Marraro Prize of the Modern Language Assosication and the John Nicholas Brown Prize of the Medieval Academy of America for her book Dante's Poets: Textuality and Truth in the 'Comedy'. She also has a wide range of interests in Medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, particularly poetry, and she is currently preparing a commentary to Dante's lyrics for the Biblioteca Universale Rizzoli. Teodolinda Barolini received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1978 and served as assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley until 1983 when she moved to New York University. In 1992, she joined the faculty of Columbia University, where she is currently the Lorenzo Da Ponte Professor of Italian. From 1992-2004 she led Columbia's Italian Department as chair and director of graduate studies, while at the same time serving as president of the Dante Society of America from 1997-2003. In 1996 she received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia. Dr. Barolini is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Stephen J. Benkovic
 Institution:  Pennsylvania State University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
Stephen J. Benkovic received an A.B. in English literature and a B.S. in chemistry from Lehigh University in 1960 and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry with a minor in physical chemistry and biochemistry from Cornell University in 1963. He joined the faculty of Pennsylvania State University in 1965, has been Evan Pugh Professor since 1977 and has held the Eberly Chair in Chemistry since 1986. Dr. Benkovic's early immersion in the classics and in English literature has facilitated his coherent presentation of complicated processes at the chemistry/biology interface. In the laboratory, he uses a dazzling combination of methodologies to define the pathways by which separate and combined protein systems carry out the chemical conversions crucial to life processes, including DNA polymerization and replication. His studies of enzyme mechanisms led to inhibitor design and chemotherapeutic agents; those on catalytic antibodies clarify the connection between chemistry and immunology. His love of literature has been transmuted to service on editorial boards of sixteen scientific journals. He was the recipient of the Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry from Pennsylvania State University in 1977, the Gowland Hopkins Award in 1986, the Repligen Award in 1989, the Alfred R. Bader Award of the American Chemical Society in 1995, the Christian B. Anfinsin Award in 2000, the National Medal of Science in 2010, and the NAS Award in Chemical Sciences in 2011. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Chemical Society, and the Royal Society. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Howard C. Berg
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  206. Physiology, Biophysics, and Pharmacology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1934
 Death Date:  December 30, 2021
   
 
Howard Berg received a Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1964, was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows (1963-66), and remained at Harvard as an associate professor of biology and chairman of the Board of Tutors in Biochemical Sciences until 1970. He then moved to the University of Colorado, serving as professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology and department chairman until 1979 when he became a professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology. In 1986 he returned to Harvard University and is currently professor of molecular and cellular biology and professor of physics, and a member of the Rowland Institute. Howard Berg was a chemist (B.S., Caltech); a medical student (two years at the Harvard Medical School); and then a graduate student in physics and Junior Fellow. As a physicist he worked with Norman Ramsey on the atomic hydrogen maser and with Ed Purcell on what is now called sedimentation field-flow fractionation. In 1968 he became interested in the motile behavior of bacteria. He has made many seminal contributions to understanding the biophysics of motility. Among other things, he and coworkers showed, via three-dimensional tracking, that E. coli executes a biased random walk and that bacterial flagella rotate: they do not wave or beat. This surprising conclusion has led Howard Berg to study the structure, genetics and physiology of the remarkable flagellar motor. Also, he has figured out how spirochetes swim, what bacterial flagella actually do when cells run and tumble and, with Ed Purcell, he developed the basic theory of the physics of chemoreception. His book Random Walks in Biology (1993), mostly about diffusion, has become a classic. His writings on life at low Reynolds numbers are great science and illustrate his intellectual reach: from pure physics to true biological understanding. His significant contributions to science reflect an approach to biological problems of a very perceptive biologist with the mind-set of a talented physicist. His inquisitiveness and productivity are models of scientific inquiry. A more recent book, E. coli in Motion (2004), reviews the field of bacterial chemotaxis. Dr. Berg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. In 2008 he received the Biophysical Society's annual award for Outstanding Investigator in Single Molecule Biology. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Pamela J. Bjorkman
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  206. Physiology, Biophysics, and Pharmacology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Pamela J. Bjorkman is the Max Delbrück Professor of Biology the California Institute of Technology. She was an HHMI Investigator from 1989-2015. She received a B.A. degree in chemistry from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. degree in biochemistry from Harvard University. As a graduate student and postdoctoral fellow in Don Wiley's laboratory, she solved the crystal structure of a human histocompatibility molecule. She continued her postdoctoral training at Stanford University with Mark Davis, where she worked on T cell receptors. Dr. Bjorkman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has received the William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Fundamental Immunology from the Cancer Research Institute (shared with Don C. Wiley and Jack L. Strominger), the James R. Klinenberg Science Award from the Arthritis Foundation, the Gairdner Foundation International Award for achievements in medical science (shared with Don C. Wiley), and the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Award (shared with Jack L. Strominger and Hans-Georg Rammensee). Dr. Bjorkman's laboratory is interested in protein-protein interactions, particularly those mediating immune recognition. The laboratory uses X-ray crystallography and biochemistry to study purified proteins, and is beginning to include confocal and electron microscopy (EM) to examine protein complexes in cells. Some of the work focuses upon homologs and mimics of class I MHC proteins. These proteins have similar three-dimensional structures but different functions, including immune functions (IgG transport by the neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn; evasion of the immune response by viral HMC mimics) and non-immune functions (regulation of iron or lipid metabolism by HFE and ZAG). Dr. Bjorkman's laboratory is also comparing the structures and functions of host and viral Fc receptors with RcRn.
 
 Name:  Dr. Jacques Blamont
 Institution:  University of Paris IV; Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  101. Astronomy
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  April 13, 2020
   
 
A distinguished scholar, leader of space research and commander of the Legion of Honor, Jacques Blamont was an internationally recognized scientist and Professor at the University of Paris - VI and Conseiller du President du CNES. He pioneered planetary exploration, leading CNES in mission design and planning, including joint efforts with the USSR. He promoted a rapprochement between the U.S. and USSR in troubled times. Working with NASA, Dr. Blamont exhibited remarkable creativeness in the design of space vehicles, scientific instruments and research approaches. His work and guidance have proven of enormous benefit to the United States. A broad intellectual, he wrote an almost poetical work on the evolution of science. His publications include Vénus dévoilée, Voyage autour d'une planète (1987); Le Chiffre et le Songe, Histoire politique de la découverte (1993); Le Lion et le Moucheron, Histoire des Marrances de Toulouse (2000); and Introduction au Siècle des Menaces (2004). Jacques Blamont died April 13, 2020 in Chatillon, France at the age of 93.
 
 Name:  Dr. Victoria Reifler Bricker
 Institution:  Tulane University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Victoria R. Bricker received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1968. She joined the faculty of Tulane University in 1969 and became professor emerita of anthropology in 2006. Dr. Bricker's brilliant research has focused on the cultural and linguistic structure of the Maya, ancient and contemporary, with path-breaking studies of three domains: the forms of ritual humor found in modern Mayan cultures (1973); comparative analysis of Mayan insurrections against Spanish rule during the colonial and modern periods (1981); and the grammar of Mayan hieroglyphs (1986). More recently, she has focused her research on the hieroglyphs and iconography found in the Mayan codices - painted bark-cloth books - (1992), and she is now universally recognized as a preeminent world authority in this scholarly field. Dr. Bricker has been the series editor of the Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians since 1977. She was an editor for American Ethnologist (1973-76) and book review editor of the American Anthropologist (1971-73). She is the author of Ritual Humor in Highland Chiapas (1973); The Indian Christ, the Indian King: The Historical Substrate of Maya Myth and Ritual (1981); A Grammar of Maya Hieroglyphs (1986); Papers on the Madrid Codex (1997); A Dictionary of the Mayan Language as Spoken in Hocaba, Yucatan (1988); (with H. Bricker) "Zodiacal References in the Maya Codices," in The Sky in Mayan Literature (1992); "Color and texture in the Maya language of Yucatan," Anthropological Linguistics (1999), (with Helga Maria Miram) "An Encounter of Two Worlds: The Book of Chilam Balam of Kaua (2002), and (with Harvey Bricker) Astronomy in the Maya Codices (2011). Victoria and Harvey Bricker are the 2011 recipients of the American Philosophical Society's John Frederick Lewis Award for Astronomy in the Maya Codices. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Anthropological Association, serving on its executive board from 1980-83. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. William F. Brinkman
 Institution:  United States Department of Energy
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  103. Engineering
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
William F. Brinkman received a Ph.D. in physics at the University of Missouri in 1965. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1966 after spending one year as an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at Oxford University. In 1972, he became head of the Infrared Physics and Electronics Research Department, and in 1974 he became the director of the Chemical Physics Research Laboratory. He held the position of director of the Physical Research Laboratory from 1981 until moving to Sandia in 1984. He returned to Bell Laboratories in 1987 to become executive director of the Physics Research Division. In 1993 he became Physical Sciences Research Vice President, and in January 2000 became Vice President, Research. He retired from this position in September 2001. He then served as president of the American Physical Society and senior research associate in the Department of Physics at Princeton University until June 2009 when he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as Director of the Office of Science in the United States Department of Energy. Overseeing the nation's research programs in fusion energy sciences and nuclear and high-energy physics, the Office is the country's single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences. He retired from the position in 2013. William Brinkman's personal research covered materials classes of great engineering significance such as metals, semiconductors, superconductors and liquid crystals. He contributed significantly in the understanding of correlated electron motion, electron-hole liquid formation, exotic superfluid states and defects in liquid crystals. His technical leadership for the development of Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) for high capacity communications systems and optical fiber fabrication has revolutionized long distance transmission. He has chaired many committees shaping the national policy for technology development and science. A contribution of singular importance is the 8 volume 1986 NRC "Brinkman Report" on the status of physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and the American Physical Society. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland
 Institution:  World Health Organization
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Gro Harlem Brundtland is a pioneering physician and international civil servant who has used her combination of scientific training, political skill and moral leadership to draw the world's attention to the challenges of sustainability and global health. She was appointed Prime Minister of Norway for the first time in 1981, at the age of 41, becoming the first woman and then the youngest person to hold that office. Dr. Brundtland served as Head of Government for more than 10 years. As chair of the World Commission on Environment and Development, she was responsible for the report "Our Common Future" in April 1987. This report introduced the influential concept of sustainability as humanity's capacity to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This report led to the first Earth Summit, the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and to many subsequent activities to promote environmental protection with economic development. As Director-General of the World Health Organization since July 1998 (again, the first woman to hold that office), Dr. Brundtland has mobilized resources and provided moral and technical leadership to improve people's health everywhere. In 2007 she was chosen by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as a special envoy to the U.N. in addressing climate change.
 
 Name:  Dr. Peter B. Dervan
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Peter B. Dervan received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1972. He joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology in 1973 and is currently the Bren Professor of Chemistry. He served as chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 1994-99. Peter Dervan is distinguished in the field of bioorganic chemistry for working out chemical principles for sequence-specific recognition of DNA. He created synthetic small molecules with affinities and sequence specificities for double-helical DNA comparable to nature's proteins that can be programmed to control gene expression in living cells. Dr. Dervan is the recipient of numerous awards, including the ACS Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry (1985); the Arthur C. Cope Award (1993); the Willard Gibbs Medal (1993); the Nichols Medal (1994); the Maison de la Chimie Foundation Prize (1996); the Remsen Award (1998); the Kirkwood Medal (1998); the Alfred Bader Award (1999); the Max Tishler Prize (1999); the Linus Pauling Medal (1999); the Richard Tolman Medal (1999); the Tetrahedron Prize for Creativity in Organic Chemistry (2000); the Harvey Prize (2002); the Ronald Breslow Award for Achievement in Biomimetic Chemistry (2005) and the National Medal of Science (2006). Dr. Dervan is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Institute of Medicine (NAS), the National Academy of Inventors, the French Academy of Sciences, and the Germany Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Mr. James O. Freedman
 Institution:  Dartmouth College; University of Iowa
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1935
 Death Date:  March 21, 2006
   
 Name:  Dr. Jerome I. Friedman
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  106. Physics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1930
   
 
Jerome I. Friedman received a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1956. He was a research associate in physics at the University of Chicago and Stanford University before joining the faculty of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1960, where he served as Institute Professor and Professor of Physics. He has also served as the director of MIT's Laboratory of Nuclear Science and head of the physics department. Jerome Friedman, along with Henry Kendall and Richard Taylor, was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1990 for pioneering investigations of the inelastic scattering of electrons from protons. The experiments they performed provided the first evidence for the existence of quarks and the fact that their spin is one-half. Earlier, Friedman and Kendall had, independently, written computer programs which enabled this information to be extracted from the data, a problem with great technical complications, a real tour de force. Dr. Friedman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Professor Paolo Galluzzi
 Institution:  Istituto e Museo Nazionale di Storia della Scienza, Florence; University of Florence
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Paolo Galluzzi is a prominent figure in the scientific and cultural life of Italy and a well known collaborator on international projects. He is a teacher-scholar, the author of several books on the science and technology of the Renaissance and other aspects of the history of science in Italy and the creator of widely acclaimed exhibitions that unite period machines with beautifully reconstructed working models. He is a master at designing and using information technology for instruction and research; a member of several commissions to conserve Italy's cultural heritage; and a tireless innovator of ways to interest high-school students and their parents in the history and culture of science and technology. Paolo Galluzzi has directed the Istituto e Museo Nazionale di Storia della Scienza, Florence since 1982 and has been Professor of the History of Science at the University of Florence since 1994.
 
 Name:  Dr. Sheldon Lee Glashow
 Institution:  Boston University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  106. Physics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1932
   
 
Sheldon Lee Glashow is one of the formulators of the electroweak interaction theory. This theory unites the weak and electromagnetic interactions. This was the first such unification since Maxwell's electromagnetic theory unified the electric and magnetic forces in the 19th century. For this work Dr. Glashow, along with Weinberg and Salam, was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1979. Dr. Glashow's work has continuously manifested an unusually high degree of originality. On purely theoretical grounds he was the first to conjecture the existence of the charmed quark, many years before it was discovered. Dr. Glashow is currently Arthur G.B. Metcalf Professor of Mathematics and the Sciences at Boston University, on whose faculty he has served since 1984. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1958 and previously taught at Harvard, Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley.
 
 Name:  Dr. Paul F. Grendler
 Institution:  University of Toronto
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Paul Grendler received a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin in 1964. In 1965 he went to the University of Toronto as an assistant professor and remained there throughout his career. He became professor emeritus in 1998. He is the author of Critics of the Italian World, 1530-1560, 1977; The Roman Inquisition and the Venetian Press, 1540-1605, 1977; Culture and Censorship in Late Renaissance Italy and France, 1981; Schooling in Renaissance Italy, 1989; Books and Schools in the Italian Renaissance, 1995; The Universities of the Italian Renaissance, 2002; Renaissance Education Between Religion and Politics, 2006; and The European Renaissance in American Life, 2006. He was Editor in Chief of The Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, 6 volumes, in 1999, and The Renaissance, an Encyclopedia for Students, 4 volumes, in 2004. He was articles editor for Renaissance Quarterly from 2000 to 2003. Paul Grendler is one of the most distinguished American scholars studying the Italian Renaissance. He is as recognized and esteemed in Italy as in North America. His book on Venice and the Inquisition was a pioneering study that has become a classic. His masterpiece, however, is his Schooling in Renaissance Italy, which after all these centuries finally told us what went on in those schools from which secondary education in the Western world was derived. His book on the universities of the Italian Renaissance is the first comprehensive study in any language of all Italian universities between 1400 and 1600 while The European Renaissance in American Life examines how Americans re-create the Renaissance or portray it in fiction and film. His books have won prizes from the American Historical Association, the American Catholic Historical Association, the American Library Association, and the Sixteenth Centuries Studies Conference. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Italian Historical Studies in 1998, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Renaissance Society of America in 2017, and the George E. Ganss, S.J., Award in 2018. Dr. Grendler was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1978-79 and has received many other fellowships. Dr. Grendler was president of the American Catholic Historical Association in 1984, the Renaissance Society of America from 1992 to 1994, and the Society for Italian Historical Studies from 2003 to 2005. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Mr. Conrad K. Harper
 Institution:  Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Conrad Harper received an LL.B. at Harvard Law School in 1965. He was a staff lawyer at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund from 1966-70. He began as an associate at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in 1971, becoming a partner of the firm in 1974. He left to serve as a legal adviser of the U.S. Department of State, 1993-96, and as a member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration, The Hague, 1993-96, and 1998-2004. Mr. Harper returned as partner of Simpson Thacher in 1996 and became of counsel in 2003. Beyond his litigation and international practice with one of New York City's premier firms, Conrad Harper's legal abilities have been applied to such diverse assignments as Chancellorship of the Episcopal Diocese of New York and leadership in the American Law Institute. His civic leadership has similarly taken him into diverse assignments including Vice Chair of the New York Public Library, presidency of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, co-chairmanship of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under Law, and the Harvard Corporation. He is a director of New York Life Insurance Company and the Public Service Enterprise Group. He is a trustee of the William Nelson Cromwell Foundation and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Mr. Harper was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Margaret C. Jacob
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Margaret Jacob received her Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1968. She was an assistant professor of history and languages and literature at the University of South Florida, Tampa, and a lecturer in European history at the University of East Anglia, UK, before becoming professor of history at Baruch College, City University of New York, in1971. She became dean of the Eugene Lang College and professor of history in the university in 1985 at the New School for Social Research. In 1996 she moved to the University of Pennsylvania as professor of history and of the history of science. She is currently Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. A leading international authority on the interaction of science, commerce, and technology and how they contributed to the industrial revolution of the early 19th century. Dr. Jacob is the author of many books and innumerable articles. She works with English, French, Belgian, and Dutch sources. A former president of the American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies, she is also a prominent academic leader. At UCLA, she has spearheaded a pathbreaking research project bringing scientists and humanists together to study chronic pain. Dr. Jacob's publications include The Newtonians and the English Revolution, 1689-1720 (1976); The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons and Republicans (1981); The Cultural Meaning of the Scientific Revolution (1988); Living the Enlightenment: Freemasonry and Politics in Eighteenth Century Europe (1991); (with Lynn Hunt and Joyce Appleby) Telling the Truth about History (1994); (with Betty Jo Teeter Dobbs) Newton and the Culture of Newtonianism (1995); Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West (1997); The Enlightenment: A Brief History (2001); and (with Larry Stewart) Practical Matter, The Impact of Newton's Science from 1687 to 1851 (2004). She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002 and in the same year awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Utrecht.
 
 Name:  Dr. Thomas H. Jordan
 Institution:  Southern California Earthquake Center; University of Southern California
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Thomas H. Jordan received his Ph.D. in geophysics and applied mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1972. He has taught at Princeton University, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as head of MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences from 1988-98. In 2000 he moved to the University of Southern California where he currently serves as University Professor of Earth Sciences. In 2002 he also became the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. Dr. Jordan is a geophysicist interested in the composition, dynamics, and evolution of the solid earth. His research concerns seismology, plate tectonics, the formation of continents, mantle structure, earthquakes and fault systems. He developed seismological techniques to make major discoveries about the three-dimensional structure of the earth's deep interior. He found that continental cratons have an underlying deep structure that translates with the continents during plate motions, and he discovered that lithospheric slabs penetrate deep into the lower mantle, demonstrating that the mantle convection system responsible for plate tectonics extends throughout the mantle. He has done seminal work on plate motions and plate-boundary deformations, slow earthquakes, and seafloor morphology. Dr. Jordan's contributions have been recognized with the James B. Macelwane Award from the American Geophysical Union in 1983, the George P. Woollard Award from the Geological Society of America in 1998, and the National Associate Award of the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Joseph Kerman
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  March 17, 2014
   
 
Joseph Kerman was a central figure in American musicology during the discipline's ascendancy in the second half of the twentieth century. He was a student of Oliver Strunk at Princeton; major influences were D.F. Tovey, William Arrowsmith, and E.T. Cone. After joining the University of California, Berkeley in 1951, he worked to consolidate its leading position in musicological studies. In 1972-74 he held the Heather Professorship of Music at Oxford and in 1987-88 delivered the Charles Eliot North Lectures at Harvard (published as Concerto Conversations). A self-described "critic and musicologist", he always addressed general readers as well as specialists; his first book, Opera as Drama, reached a broad readership. He wrote for general readers in Hudson Review (1948-62) and New York Review (1970-). He also urged that criticism should assume a role within "official" musicology; the hasty evolution of the discipline in the 1980s was spurred both by his polemical book Contemplating Music and his editorship of the innovative journal 19th Century Music. He wrote on a variety of topics in classical music up to the twentieth century, with specialties in Elizabethan music and the music of Beethoven (books: The Elizabethan Madrigal and The Masses and Motets of William Byrd; Beethoven, with Alan Tyson, and The Beethoven Quartets). Other books are The Art of Fugue, a critical edition of Beethoven's "Kafka" sketchbook, the long-running textbook Listen, and the essay collections Write All These Down and Opera and the Morbidity of Music. Joseph Kerman died March 17, 2014, at the age of 89 in Berkeley, California. He had been elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
 Name:  Dr. Judith Kimble
 Institution:  University of Wisconsin, Madison; Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  202. Cellular and Developmental Biology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
How are cells controlled to grow or differentiate during animal development? Judith Kimble tackled that fundamental question in the developing germline of a small nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Early in her career she identified the somatic niche that promotes germline growth during development. Since then she discovered that Notch signaling from the niche promotes continued mitosis at the expense of meiotic entry. More recently, she and collaborators have elucidated the molecular network that maintains germline stem cells and controls their balance between mitosis and meiotic entry. Remarkably this network also controls the sperm/oocyte decision, although the mechanism of that dual control is still being addressed. Dr. Kimble has become one of the most respected and creative developmental biologists by exploiting the power of genetics and molecular biology to unravel complex developmental phenomena. Based on her work and that of others, developmental biologists came to realize that embryos as different as worms, fruit flies and mammals share similar developmental mechanisms. Dr. Kimble is the Vilas Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Medical Genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she began as a faculty member in 1983; she is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 1994. Dr. Kimble is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1995) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1995) and holds a Ph. D. from the University of Colorado-Boulder.
 
 Name:  Dr. Stanley J. Korsmeyer
 Institution:  Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Harvard Medical School
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  202. Cellular and Developmental Biology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1950
 Death Date:  March 31, 2005
   
Election Year
2002[X]
Page: 1 2 3  Next