American Philosophical Society
Member History

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1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences[X]
Subdivision
105. Physical Earth Sciences[X]
1Name:  Dr. Philip Hauge Abelson
 Institution:  American Association for the Advancement of Science
 Year Elected:  1961
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1913
 Death Date:  August 1, 2004
   
2Name:  Dr. Claude Jean Allègre
 Institution:  Institut Physique du Globe de Paris
 Year Elected:  1992
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Claude Allègre was a professor of geochemistry at the University of Paris VI (Pierre and Marie Curie) since 1970, and became professor emeritus at the Institut Physique du Globe de Paris in 2009. He is a world leader in isotope geochemistry and is responsible for bringing this research area into flower in France. His research in a wide variety of isotopic problems with particular emphasis on earth structure and earth dynamics has been of continuing excitement to the scientific community throughout the world. He has been active in unifying the earth sciences community in Europe and is a founder of the European Union of Geosciences, for which he served as president. Dr. Allègre has also been active politically, having served as Minister of Education of France from 1997 to 2000. He has been a major leader in revitalizing science education and research in France. A brilliant and stimulating speaker with wide interests, Dr. Allègre is the author of three books on the development of geosciences for a general audience. His scientific accomplishments have been recognized with many medals and honors, including the Day Medal of the Geological Society of America and the V.M. Goldschmidt Medal of the Geochemical Society. In 1986 the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded him the Crafoord Prize for his work in isotope geochemistry with G.J. Wasserburg.
 
3Name:  Dr. A. Francis Birch
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1955
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1903
 Death Date:  2/1/92
   
4Name:  Dr. Wallace S. Broecker
 Institution:  Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1931
 Death Date:  February 18, 2019
   
 
For more than half a century Wally Broecker devoted his life to study of the role of the oceans in climate change. By using isotopic analysis to study physical mixing and chemical cycling in the ocean, he developed a picture of the ocean’s thermohaline circulations as comprising a conveyor belt. He showed this global conveyor belt to be susceptible to sudden shifts from one mode to another, and in the process able to trigger changes in climate that are not slow to develop but instead abrupt. This conceptual framework, which he outlined in more than 450 papers and ten books, provides an essential starting point for our present-day understanding of climate, dating back to the Pleistocene and extending forward to its long-term future outlook. Broecker was a recipient of the National Medal of Science (1996) and numerous other honors. Wallace Broecker died February 18, 2019 in Manhattan at the age of 87.
 
5Name:  Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone
 Institution:  National Academy of Sciences; University of California, Irvine
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1943
 Death Date:  November 5, 2016
   
 
Ralph Cicerone received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering, with a minor in physics, from the University of Illinois in 1970. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1972 as a research scientist and assistant professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering. In 1978 he moved to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, where he was a research chemist. He served as a senior scientist and Director of the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research from 1980-89. He then became the Daniel G. Aldrich Professor of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine, where he chaired the department of Earth System Science from 1989-94. Dr. Cicerone was appointed Chancellor of the University of California, Irvine in 1998. In 2005 he became President of the National Academy of Sciences and was reelected in 2011. He served until 2016. Ralph Cicerone's research has greatly increased our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of trace gases through the atmosphere, especially concerning ozone depletion and increased greenhouse gases such as methane. He was one of the first to point out the potential for global ozone depletion by stratospheric chlorine. With Ramanathan and with Dickinson, he wrote early papers on the radiative forcing of global climate change due to trace gases and he lectured widely on human causes of climate change and energy usage. In addition to the cumulative body of research, he was a leader in science policy issues. Dr. Cicerone received the United Nations Environment Program Ozone Award in 1997, the Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute in 1998, and the American Geophysical Union's 2002 Roger Revelle Medal in recognition of outstanding research contributions to the understanding of the Earth's atmospheric processes, and the 2004 Einstein Prize for Science from the World Cultural Council. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Accademia dei Lincei and the Russian Academy of Sciences, he also served as president of the American Geophysical Union. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2000. Ralph Cicerone died November 5, 2016, at the age of 73.
 
6Name:  Dr. Preston Cloud
 Institution:  University of California, Santa Barbara
 Year Elected:  1973
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1912
 Death Date:  1/16/91
   
7Name:  Dr. Allen Verne Cox
 Year Elected:  1984
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  1/27/87
   
8Name:  Dr. Don L. Anderson
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  1990
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1933
 Death Date:  December 2, 2014
   
 
Don L. Anderson was Eleanor and John R. McMillan Professor of Geophysics in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology at the time of his death at 81 on December 2, 2014. With an interest in the origin, evolution, structure and composition of Earth and other planets, Dr. Anderson integrated into his work seismological, solid state physics, geochemical and petrological data. He received his B.S. in Geology and Geophysics from Rochester Polytechnic Institute in 1955 and his Ph.D. in Geophysics and Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1962. From 1955-58 Dr. Anderson worked for Chevron Oil Company, the Air Force Cambridge Research Center and the Arctic Institute of North America, and from 1967-89 he directed the Seismological Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Anderson received the Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society, the Arthur L. Day Gold Medal of the Geological Society of America, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Bowie Medal of the American Geophysical Union, the Crafoord Prize of the Royal Swedish Academy of Science and the National Medal of Science. He was a past president of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Anderson was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1972 and the National Academy of Sciences in 1982. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1990.
 
9Name:  Dr. Kerry Emanuel
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Dr. Kerry Emanuel is Professor Emeritus of Atmospheric Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was on the faculty, most recently as Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science, from 1981-2022, after spending three years on the faculty of UCLA. Emanuel’s initial focus was on the dynamics of rain and snow banding in winter storms, but his interests gradually migrated to the meteorology of the tropics and to climate change. His specialty is hurricane physics and he was the first to investigate how long-term climate change might affect hurricane activity, an issue that continues to occupy him today. His interests also include cumulus convection, and advanced methods of sampling the atmosphere in aid of numerical weather prediction. Emanuel is the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and three books, including Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes, published by Oxford University Press and aimed at a general audience, and What We Know about Climate Change, published by the MIT Press and now entering its third edition. He is a co-director of MIT’s Lorenz Center, a climate think tank devoted to basic, curiosity-driven climate research.
 
10Name:  Dr. W. G. Ernst
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1994
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1931
   
 
W.G. Ernst joined the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles, on January 1, 1960. He rose through the ranks to professor of geology and geophysics, chairman of the department of geology, (1970-74), chairman of the department of earth and space sciences, (1978-82), and UCLA director of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (1987-89). On September 1, 1989, he moved to Stanford University for a five-year term as dean of the School of Earth Sciences. Since 1999, he has held the Benjamin M. Page Chair, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University. Dr. Ernst was chairman of the Board of Earth Sciences of the National Research Council (1984-87), served on the NRC Board of Earth Sciences and Resources (1988-93), and is a trustee for the Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (1990-present). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (chairman, section of Geology, 1979-82; secretary, then chair of Class I from 1997-2003) and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the American Geophysical Union, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Geological Society of America (president, 1985-86), and the Mineralogical Society of America (president, 1980-81). Dr. Ernst is also the author of six books and research memoirs, editor of 15 other research volumes, and author of more than 220 scientific papers, (not including numerous abstracts, book reviews, etc.) dealing with the physical chemistry of rocks and minerals; the Phanerozoic interactions of lithospheric plates and mobile mountain belts, especially in central Asia, the Circumpacific and the Western Alps; early Precambrian petrotectonic evolution; ultrahigh-pressure subduction-zone metamorphism and tectonics; geobotanical studies; Earth System science/remote sensing; and mineralogy and human health. He received the Mineralogical Society of America MSA Award in 1969 and its Roebling Medal for 2005, UCLA Faculty Research Lecturer in 1988, the Geological Society of Japan Medal for 1998, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Outstanding Teaching Award for 2003, the Penrose Medal of Geological Society of America for 2004, and the American Geological Institute's Legendary Geoscientist Award in 2008.
 
11Name:  Dr. Inez Y. Fung
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Inez Fung's research focuses on climate change and the global carbon cycle. Her work in climate modeling predicts the co-evolution of carbon dioxide and climate and concludes that the diminishing capacities of the land and oceans to store carbon act to accelerate global warming. A native of Hong Kong, Inez Fung received her S.B. in Applied Mathematics and her Sc.D. in Meteorology from MIT. After her NRC postdoctoral fellowship at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, she was affiliated with NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, and the University of Victoria in Canada. She joined the faculty of the University of California, Berekely in 1998 and is a Professor of Atmospheric Science in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science and the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. Among her numerous honors are Fellowship in the American Meteorological Society and of the American Geophysical Union; the Roger Revelle Medal of the American Geophysical Union; membership of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences (USA) and Academia Sinica (Taiwan); and the 2019 Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal from the American Meteorological Society. She was a contributing author to the Assessment Reports of the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Vice President Al Gore. Fung is a subject in a biography series for middle-school readers "Women's Adventure in Science" launched by the National Academy of Sciences. The title of her biography is "Forecast Earth."
 
12Name:  Dr. Richard M. Goody
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1997
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  August 3, 2023
   
 
Richard M. Goody died on August 3, 2023 at Broadmead, a continuing care retirement community, in Cockeysville, MD. He was 102 years old. Richard Goody was born in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, England on June 19, 1921. He and his family immigrated to the United States in 1958 and became US citizens in 1965. He is survived by his daughter, Brigid Goody. His wife, Elfriede Goody, and his brother, Jack Goody, preceded him in death. Dr. Goody attended Cambridge University from which he received a bachelor’s degree in physics in 1942. After military service during World War II, he returned to Cambridge to receive his PhD in 1949. He studied radioactive transfer in planetary atmospheres. In 1958, he was appointed as Professor of Dynamic Meteorology and Director of the Blue Hill Observatory at Harvard. He remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1991 as Mallinckrodt and Gordon McKay Professor Emeritus. Dr. Goody's fundamental contributions to geophysics began in 1949 with his work at Cambridge University, England, on the understanding of the structure of stratosphere in which radiative processes play the dominant role in its thermal equilibrium state. This study led him to pursue infrared radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres and the manner in which simplified methodologies can be developed for effective calculations of radiative heating in the atmosphere. Dr. Goody was the first scientist to recognize the potential of using emission spectra for the quantitative measurement of ozone and nitrous oxide, long before the role of these gases in global warming was a fundamental concern. Following his appointment as Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Dynamic Meteorology and Director of the Blue Hill Observatory at Harvard University in 1958, Dr. Goody became the prime academic force in building the Earth and planetary physics program there. He continued research on a number of fundamental programs involving infrared radiation transfer and produced a classic book, Atmospheric radiation: I, Theoretical basis, which he published in 1964. In 1970 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences, playing an important role in the geophysics section of the Academy. He also played a key role in the U.S. exploration program on the atmospheres of other planets, principally Mars and Venus. His many important contributions included interpretation of spectroscopy data for the understanding and determination of the planetary compositions and dynamic processes, as well as the instrument design for space probes. In 1982 Dr. Goody, along with two of his colleagues, spearheaded a program referred to as 'Global Habitability' to examine the factors affecting the Earth's ability to sustain life, principally through biogeochemical cycles and climate. He could accurately be described as "the grandfather of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program." Among his many awards are the Buchan Prize of the Royal Meteorological Society (1958); the 50th Anniversary Medal (1970) and the Cleveland Abbe Award (1977) of the American Meteorological Society, 1970; NASA's Public Service Medal (1980); the William Bowie Medal (1998) of the American Geophysical Union; and the Gold Medal (2004) of the International Radiation Commission. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1997.
 
13Name:  Dr. William H. Hooke
 Institution:  American Meteorological Society
 Year Elected:  2006
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
William H. Hooke was a senior policy fellow at the American Meteorological Society from 2000-2022, and director of the Policy Program from 2001-2022. His current policy research interests include: natural disaster reduction; historical precedents as they illuminate present-day policy; and the nature and implications of changing national requirements for weather and climate science and services. He also directs AMS policy education programs, including the AMS Summer Policy Colloquium, and the AMS-UCAR Congressional Science Fellowship Program. From 1967-2000, Dr. Hooke worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and antecedent agencies. After six years of research in fundamental geophysical fluid dynamics and its application to the ionosphere, the boundary layer, air quality, aviation, and wind engineering, he moved into a series of management positions of increasing scope and responsibility. From 1973-80, he was Chief of the Wave Propagation Laboratory Atmospheric Studies Branch; from 1980-83 he rotated through a series of management development assignments; and from 1984-87 he directed NOAA's Environmental Sciences Group (now the Forecast Systems Lab), responsible for much of the systems R&D for the NWS Modernization, as well as a range of other weather and climate research activities. From 1987-93 he served as the Deputy Chief Scientist and Acting Chief Scientist of NOAA, setting policy and direction for $300M/year of NOAA R&D in oceanography, atmospheric science, hydrology, climate, marine biology, and associated technologies. Between 1993 and 2000, he held two national responsibilities: Director of the U.S. Weather Research Program Office, and Chair of the interagency Subcommittee for Natural Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. Dr. Hooke was an adjunct faculty member at the University of Colorado from 1969-87 and served as a fellow of two NOAA Joint Institutes (CIRES, 1971-1977; CIRA 1987-2000). The author of over fifty refereed publications and co-author of one book, Dr. Hooke holds a B.S. (Physics Honors) from Swarthmore College (1964) and S.M. (1966) and Ph.D (1967) degrees from the University of Chicago. He is a Fellow of the AMS and a member of the American Philosophical Society. Currently, he chairs the NAS/NRC Disasters Roundtable and serves on the ICSU Planning Group on Natural and Human-Induced Environmental Hazards and Disasters.
 
14Name:  Dr. Thomas H. Jordan
 Institution:  Southern California Earthquake Center; University of Southern California
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Thomas H. Jordan received his Ph.D. in geophysics and applied mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1972. He has taught at Princeton University, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as head of MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences from 1988-98. In 2000 he moved to the University of Southern California where he currently serves as University Professor of Earth Sciences. In 2002 he also became the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. Dr. Jordan is a geophysicist interested in the composition, dynamics, and evolution of the solid earth. His research concerns seismology, plate tectonics, the formation of continents, mantle structure, earthquakes and fault systems. He developed seismological techniques to make major discoveries about the three-dimensional structure of the earth's deep interior. He found that continental cratons have an underlying deep structure that translates with the continents during plate motions, and he discovered that lithospheric slabs penetrate deep into the lower mantle, demonstrating that the mantle convection system responsible for plate tectonics extends throughout the mantle. He has done seminal work on plate motions and plate-boundary deformations, slow earthquakes, and seafloor morphology. Dr. Jordan's contributions have been recognized with the James B. Macelwane Award from the American Geophysical Union in 1983, the George P. Woollard Award from the Geological Society of America in 1998, and the National Associate Award of the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
15Name:  Dr. Charles D. Keeling
 Institution:  Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1928
 Death Date:  June 20, 2005
   
 
Dr. Charles D. Keeling has been associated with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego since 1956. He has been a professor of oceanography since 1968. Born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in April 1928, he received a B.A. degree in chemistry from the University of Illinois in 1948 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University in 1954. Prior to joining Scripps Institution, Dr. Keeling was a postdoctoral fellow in geochemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Keeling's major areas of interest include the geochemistry of carbon and oxygen and other aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with an emphasis on the carbon cycle in nature. He has promoted the study of complex relationships between the carbon cycle and changes in climate. The Keeling record of the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide measured at Mauna Loa, Hawaii and at other "pristine air" locations, represents an important time series data for the study of global change. Keeling also has studied the role of oceans in modulating the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide by carrying out extremely accurate measurements of carbon dissolved in seawater. Keeling and his colleagues also have undertaken significant efforts in global carbon cycle modeling. As an example, in 1996, Keeling, with his colleagues at Scripps, showed that the amplitude of the Northern Hemispheric seasonal cycle in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been increasing, providing independent support for the conclusion that the growing season in beginning earlier, perhaps in response to global warming. While at Scripps, Keeling has been a Guggenheim Fellow at the Meteorological Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden (1961-62), and a guest professor at both the Second Physical Institute of the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1969-70), and the Physical Institute of the University of Bern, Switzerland (1979-80). In 2002, President George W. Bush presented Keeling with the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest award for lifetime achievement in scientific research. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the recipient of the 1980 Second Half Century Award of the American Meteorology Society and the Blue Planet Prize awarded in 1993 by the Science Council of Japan. He received a Special Achievement Award in 1997, presented by Vice President, Albert Gore, the National Medal of Science in 2001, presented by President George Bush, and the Tyler Prize for contributions to global environment science in 2005.
 
16Name:  Dr. Charles F. Kennel
 Institution:  Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of California, San Diego
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Charles F. Kennel was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts and was educated in astronomy and astrophysics at Harvard and Princeton. He then joined the UCLA Department of Physics, pursued research and teaching in space plasma physics and astrophysics, and chaired the department for three years. He eventually became the UCLA Executive Vice Chancellor, its chief academic officer. From 1994 to 1996, he was Associate Administrator at NASA and Director of Mission to Planet Earth, the world's largest Earth science program. His experiences at NASA convinced him to devote the rest of his career to Earth and environmental science. Kennel was the ninth Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Vice Chancellor of Marine Sciences at the University of California, San Diego, from 1998 to 2006. Dr. Kennel now works with the UCSD Environment and Sustainability Initiative, an all-campus effort embracing teaching, research, campus operations, and public outreach, and is a distinguished professor of atmospheric sciences at Scripps. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society, Kennel has served on many national and international boards and committees, including the Pew Oceans Commission. He was a member of the NASA Advisory Council from 1998 to 2006, and its Chair from 2001 to 2005. He has had visiting appointments to the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Trieste), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (Boulder), the Ecole Polytechnique (Paris), Caltech (Pasadena), Princeton, Space Research Institutes (Brazil, Moscow), and the University of Cambridge. He is a recipient of the James Clerk Maxwell Prize (American Physical Society), the Hannes Alfven Prize (European Geophysical Society), the Aurelio Peccei Prize (Accademia Lincei), and the NASA Distinguished Service and Distinguished Public Service Medals. He was the 2007 C.P. Snow Lecturer at the University of Cambridge.
 
17Name:  Dr. Susan W. Kieffer
 Institution:  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Susan W. Kieffer became Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2013, where she had served as Center for Advanced Study Professor of Geology and Physics, Walgreen University Chair, and affiliate faculty member in Civil and Environmental Engineering since 2000. After she received a Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology she was assistant professor of geology at the University of California, Los Angeles, 1973-79, a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, 1979-90, professor of geology, 1989-91, and Regents' Professor of Geology, 1991-93, at Arizona State University, and professor of geological sciences and head of geological sciences at the University of British Columbia, 1993-95. In 1995 she was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and co-founded Kieffer & Woo, Inc. the following year. Susan Kieffer pursues an eclectic mix of research in geophysical fluid dynamics. Phenomena she has investigated range from rapids in the Grand Canyon, to supersonic volcanic eruptions, to the mysterious workings of the Old Faithful geyser, to the jet of water vapor erupting from Enceladus, to plumes of volcanic ash and gas. All these systems have complex fluid dynamics as a key part of the problem, but each one of them required synthesis of concepts reaching beyond fluid dynamics. Kieffer has been very creative and fearless in attacking these various problems and finding the various tools needed to solve them. She developed a theory for predicting the thermodynamic properties of minerals, work that earned her the Mineralogical Society of America’s award for distinguished work in mineralogy. More recently, she has focused on Earth-related disasters. Her book, The Dynamics of Disaster, and blog, "Geology in Motion," bring the relevant science to a wide audience and also provide thoughtful consideration of the impacts on society of rare yet cataclysmic events. Susan Kieffer was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1986 and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1988. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
18Name:  Dr. Margaret Galland Kivelson
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1928
   
 
Margaret Kivelson is Distinguished Professor of Space Physics in the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (Acting Director in 1999-2000) and the Department of Earth and Space Sciences (Chair from 1984-1987) at UCLA, where she has served on the faculty since 1975. Her research interests are in the areas of solar terrestrial physics and planetary science. She is known for work on the particles and magnetic fields in the surroundings of Earth and Jupiter and for investigations of properties of Jupiter's Galilean moons. She was the Principal Investigator for the Magnetometer on the Galileo Orbiter that acquired data in Jupiter's magnetosphere for eight years and is a Co-Investigator on various other investigations including the FGM (magnetometer) of the Cluster mission. Dr. Kivelson obtained her A.B. in 1950 and her A.M. and Ph.D. in 1952 and 1957, respectively, from Radcliffe College, Harvard University. Her honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship (1973-74), the Radcliffe Graduate Society Medal (1983), the Harvard University 350th Anniversary Alumni Medal (1986), several NASA Group Achievement Awards, and memberships in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. She is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the International Academy of Astronautics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was awarded the Alfvén Medal of the European Geophysical Union and the Fleming Medal of the American Geophysical Union in 2005. She has served on numerous advisory committees, including the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council, and is a Council Member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Kivelson has published more than 300 research papers and is co-editor of a widely used textbook on space physics. She has presented numerous seminars and invited talks at scientific conferences. In addition, she lectures on space research to K-12 students and other general audiences. She has been active in efforts to identify the barriers faced by women as students, faculty and practitioners of the physical sciences and to improve the environment in which they function.
 
19Name:  Dr. Leon Knopoff
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles
 Year Elected:  1992
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1925
 Death Date:  January 20, 2011
   
 
A pioneer in the study of the scattering and diffraction of elastic waves in the earth, Leon Knopoff was Professor Emeritus of Physics and Geophysics at the University of California, Los Angeles. He had been associated with UCLA since 1950 and since 1959 as professor of geophysics and physics and as a research musicologist. During a distinguished career that had also taken him to Miami University and the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Knopoff delineated the major differences in the structure of the earth's mantle beneath the continents and oceans and made significant contributions toward establishing relationships between the physics of fracture and clustering of earthquakes with special attention to the problems of earthquake prediction. For such accomplishments he was awarded the Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society (1978), the H.F. Reid Medal of the Seismological Society of America (1990) and the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal (1979) and had been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He received his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1949 and was also Docteur honoris causa, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (2004) and Honorary Professor, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing (2004). Leon Knopoff died at home in Sherman Oaks, California, on January 20, 2011, at the age of 85.
 
20Name:  Dr. Konrad B. Krauskopf
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1967
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1910
 Death Date:  May 4, 2003
   
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