American Philosophical Society
Member History

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408[X]
1Name:  Dr. Frantz Grenet
 Institution:  Collège de France
 Year Elected:  2017
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  408
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Frantz Grenet was born on 6 November 1952 at Gruchet-le-Valasse (Normandy, France). From 1972 to 1977 he studied History at the École Normale Supérieure (Paris) (« agrégation d’Histoire » in 1975), Persian at the Institut des Langues Orientales, Middle Iranian languages at the École Pratique des Hautes Etudes. After a first acquaintance with Middle Eastern field archaeology in Lebanon (Tell Arqa), he met Central Asian archaeology in 1975, when he took part to the excavations of the Hellenistic city of Ai Khanum. From 1977 to 1981 he was posted in DAFA (Délégation Archéologique Française en Afghanistan, Kabul), first as research fellow, then as deputy-director, under the successive directorships of Paul Bernard and Jean-Claude Gardin. Excavations in Ai Khanum continued in 1977 and 1978, then were interrupted by the war. In 1981 he presented his thesis Les pratiques funéraires dans l’Asie centrale sédentaire de la conquête grecque à l’islamisation (Université Paris 1, director Jean-Marie Dentzer) ; an expanded version of this thesis was published under the same title in 1984 (Paris, Éditions du CNRS). From 1981 to 2013 he worked in the CNRS (research fellow, then research director since 1990), in the team UMR 8546 « Archéologie d’Orient et d’Occident » based at the École Normale Supérieure (45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris). In addition, from 1999 onwards he taught as « directeur d’études » at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Sorbonne, Paris), section of Religious Sciences, chair « Religions of the ancient Iranian world », a consequence of his continuous interest in Zoroastrian studies linked with his joint work with the late Professor Mary Boyce (M. Boyce, F. Grenet, A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. III: Zoroastrianism under Macedonian and Roman rule, Leiden, 1991). In 1989 he has the opportunity to return to the Central Asian archaeological field, with the establishment under his directorship of the French-Uzbek Archaeological Mission in Sogdiana, which since then has continuously carried out excavations and surveys at Afrasiab (the site of ancient Samarkand) and other sites in Uzbekistan, bringing new information on all periods from the early Iron Age to the Mongol invasion. In 2004 and 2012 he also returned to Afghanistan for fieldwork. In 2001, invited professor at UC Berkeley. Since 2013, professor at the Collège de France (Paris), chair « History and Cultures of pre-Islamic Central Asia ». In 2017, invited professor at Renmin University (Peking). Author of four books : Les pratiques funéraires…, 1984 ; L’Asie centrale préislamique, bibliographie critique 1977-1986, 1988 ; La Geste d’Ardashir fils de Pâbag, 2003; The Golden Journey to Samarkand (in Chinese), 2016. Editor or co-editor of four volumes, co-organizer of four international conferences (lastly : Third SEECHAC International Colloquium Interaction in the Himalayas and Central Asia, Vienna, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 2013, published 2017), author or co-author of about 170 specialized articles in specialized journals or conference volumes. Member of the editorial boards of Studia Iranica (Paris), Corpus Inscriptionum Iranicarum (London). Corresponding member of Istituto Italiano per l’Africa e l’Oriente (since 1994), Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-lettres (since 1997). Foreign Correspondent of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (since 2014). President of SEECHAC (European Society for the Study of Cultures of the Himalaya and Central Asia) since 2012. Member of the Advisory Board of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (University of New York) since 2013. In October 2018 Frantz Grenet was awarded honorary citizenship of the city of Samarkand, in a ceremony at the Embassy of Uzbekistan in Paris. Personal Website : http://frantz.grenet.free.fr
 
2Name:  Dr. Fedwa Malti-Douglas
 Institution:  Indiana University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  408
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Fedwa Malti-Douglas served as the Martha C. Kraft Chair of Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Gender Studies and Comparative Literature and Adjunct Professor of Law in the School of Law at Indiana University. In January 2013 she became College Professor Emeritus at Indiana University. A former Chercheur at the CNRS in Paris, she was a faculty member at the Salzburg Seminar in Salzburg, Austria, a Resident Fellow at the Bellagio Study and Conference Center, and a Senior Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University. She was selected by the Cornell College of Arts and Sciences as the James H. Becker Annual Distinguished Alumna. In addition, Dr. Malti-Douglas has delivered many annual, name, and endowed lectures, been the recipient of numerous grants, and served on various boards (including editorial boards) and visiting committees. After winning the 1997 Kuwait Prize for Arts and Letters, Dr. Malti-Douglas went on to receive the 1998 Distinguished Scholar Award from the Office for Women's Affairs as well as the 2000 Distinguished Faculty Research Lecture Award at Indiana University (both university wide). The Indiana University Student Association had already named her an Outstanding Teacher in 1993-94. The author of nine scholarly books and coauthor of three more, she has also published over ninety articles (as well as being editor of coeditor of four volumes). Her book Men, Women, and God(s) was chosen as A Centennial Book by the University of California Press (1995) and her The Starr Report Disrobed (2000) was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Dr. Malti-Douglas has also published a novel, Hisland (1998, 1999), an academic satire featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education, where Marjorie Perloff called it "one of the funniest academic novels in recent years." Prof. Malti-Douglas has been a guest on radio and television programs. She served as Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender (4 volumes, 2006). She was awarded the 2014 National Humanities Medal and the 2015 Indiana University President's Medal.
 
3Name:  Dr. Robert B. Pippin
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  408
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Robert B. Pippin is the current Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought and the Chair of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago, having previously taught at the University of California, San Diego. Arguably more than anyone else in the Anglo-American philosophical world, Robert Pippin is responsible for the very considerable rise of interest in Hegel's thought that has taken place since the publication of his pathbreaking book Hegel's Idealism (1989). For Pippin, Hegel is not simply one of the great figures of the philosophical past; rather, from the first he has found in Hegel an exemplary thinker for the present age, one whose writings have first to be understood in the context of problems inherited from Kant and his immediate successors, but which then can be seen to bear closely on problems in the philosophy of mind, art, action and Continental and English-language traditions. More recently, Pippin has ranged widely across the 19th and 20th centuries, with magisterial essays on figures such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Blumenberg, Gadamer and Strauss, as well as a highly original book on the novelist Henry James. He is currently putting the final editorial touches to a book-length study of Hegel's theory of agency. He was the 2001 winner of the Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award. As mentioned, he has authored a number of books, including: Kant’s Theory of Form: An Essay on the Critique of Pure Reason, 1982; Modernism as a Philosophical Problem: On the Dissatisfactions of European High Culture, 1991; Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations, 1997; Henry James and Modern Moral Life, 2000; The Persistence of Subjectivity: On the Kantian Aftermath, 2005; Hegel's Practical Philosophy: Rational Agency as Ethical Life, 2008. He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 2007.
 
4Name:  Professor Daniel Roche
 Institution:  Collège de France
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  408
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Daniel Roche is a Professor at the Collège de France. In his career as teacher and scholar, Daniel Roche has been one of the greatest forces in the renewal of historical studies over the last thirty years. As a specialist on urban societies, his work has focused upon three lines of inquiry: understanding the link between urban milieu and both scholarly and popular forms of culture; analyzing the birth of societies of consumption taking both material and intellectual culture as their starting point; and, finally, demonstrating mobility in traditional societies. His many works include (titles translated from French): The Century of the Enlightenment in the Provinces: Provincial Academies and Academicians, 1689-1789, 1978; The People of Paris: Essay on Popular Culture in the Eighteenth Century, 1981; Diary of My Life: Critical Edition of the Diary of Jacques-Louis Ménétra, an Eighteenth-century Master Glazier, 1982; Paris under the Old Régime, 1983; French People and the Old Régime, I. Society and State, II. Culture and Society, 1984; French Republicans of Letters: Persons of Culture and Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century, 1988; The Culture of Appearances: Essay on the History of Clothing in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, 1989; France of the Enlightenment, 1993; A History of Ordinary Things: Birth of the Society of Consumption, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, 1997; Paris Almanac for Foreigners, 2001; Wandering Moods: the History of Voyages and the Journeyings of Peoples, 2003. He is a member of Academia Europea (1989) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1998).
 
5Name:  Professor Peter Stallybrass
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  408
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Peter Stallybrass is Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. For the last thirteen years, he has directed the seminar on the History of Material Texts, and he co-edits the Material Texts series for the University of Pennsylvania Press. While training as a mortician in England after leaving school, he started to read obsessively the novels of Dostoevsky and, with the mistaken impression that one would have more time to read at university, applied to the University of Sussex. Peter was an undergraduate, a graduate, and finally a lecturer at Sussex, where he directed the graduate program in Renaissance Studies and the faculty/graduate seminar in Critical Theory. In 1984, he was a co-founder of the Popular Literature Group at the Centre for Social History in Oxford, organizing conferences on Romance and on Detective Fiction. In 1978, he visited the United States for the first time to teach for a year at Smith College, where he met his wife, Ann Rosalind Jones, Esther Cloudman Dunn Professor of Comparative Literature. After eight years of commuting across the Atlantic, he moved to Dartmouth College in 1986 and, in 1988, to the University of Pennsylvania, with visiting positions at King's College, University of London, and at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He has received fellowships from the American Council for Learned Societies, the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and he has been the Mellon Fellow at the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Moses Aaron Dropsie Fellow at the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies,. He has also served as Samuel Wannamaker Fellow at the Globe Theatre in London. In 1999, he was chair of the English Institute at Harvard University, and he has been a Trustee of the Institute since 2002. At Penn, he has been awarded both the Ira Abrams Award and the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. Most of Peter's early work was on literary and cultural theory, and he published The Politics and Poetics of Transgression, co-written with Allon White, in 1986. His continuing interest in this field has led to a book on Marx, materiality, and memory, published in Brazil in 1999 under the title O Casaco de Marx: Roupas, Memória, Dor. His interest in material culture took a new turn after the death of Allon White and the particular problems of disposing of his friend's clothes. As a memorial lecture for Allon, he wrote "Worn Worlds: Clothes, Mourning, and the Life of Things," which led him to a collaboration with Ann Rosalind Jones on Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory, published by Cambridge University Press and awarded the James Russell Lowell prize by the MLA in 2001. In 1994, Peter founded the seminar on the History of Material Texts at the University of Pennsylvania, which has been meeting weekly ever since, and has brought together academics, librarians, writers, artists, and anyone interested in books and other cultural technologies. Peter's interest in the history of books began after reading Magreta de Grazia's Shakespeare Verbatim, and, drawing upon many of the ideas in her book, he wrote with her The Materiality of the Shakespearean Text (Shakespeare Quarterly 1993). He also began to teach a graduate class that met in and drew upon the wealth of Philadelphia's libraries, including the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Rosenbach Library, and the Free Library, in addition to the University's libraries. Since Roger Chartier was appointed to the History Department at Penn in 2000, he and Peter have been teaching an undergraduate seminar on Reading, Writing, and Printing. Teaching Hamlet, they discovered the material basis of Hamlet's erasable "tables of the mind" in the Folger Shakespeare Library and, together with Frank Mowery (the Folger's Head of Conservation) and Heather Wolfe (the Folger's Curator of Manuscripts), wrote "Hamlet's Tables and the Technologies of Writing in Renaissance England" (Shakespeare Quarterly 2004). Peter's work at the Library Company of Philadelphia led him to collaborate with Jim Green, the Librarian, to curate exhibitions on Material Texts and on Benjamin Franklin (for which Jim and he wrote Benjamin Franklin, Writer and Printer, co-published by Oak Knoll, the Library Company and the British Library in 2006). In 2006, he also co-curated with Heather Wolfe and Michael Mendle an exhibition on Technologies of Writing at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. The same year, Peter gave the A. S. W. Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography at the University of Pennsylvania on Printing for Manuscript, which will be published in 2008.
 
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