American Philosophical Society
Member History

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1Name:  Dr. Frances E. Allen
 Institution:  IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
 Year Elected:  2001
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  August 4, 2020
   
 
Frances E. Allen received her M.A. at the University of Michigan in 1957 and began her career as an engineer with IBM Research. Since 1989 she has been an IBM Fellow at the T.J. Watson Research Center. Jointly with APS member John Cocke, Dr. Allen is the principal source of machine-independent and language-independent code optimization technology. This technology is used in most compilers today: transforming the program into a simplified, largely machine-independent intermediate form; followed by optimization of this intermediate form; and finally generating the machine-dependent code which is executed. The result is a program that is easier to write and efficient to execute. Practically all subsequent work on producing efficient programs relies on Dr. Allen's seminal work. It is hard to imagine today's large and complex programs without her pioneering work. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2001. In 2007 she became the first woman honored with the Turing Award, one of the most prestigious prizes in computing. In 2010 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.
 
2Name:  Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1933
   
 
Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy is a pioneering researcher in machine perception, robotics and artificial intelligence. Dr. Bajcsy is the Director of CITRIS at the University of California, charged with shaping the center's vision and scientific strategy. She is also a member of the Neuroscience Institute and the School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the former Director of the University of Pennsylvania's General Robotics and Active Sensory Perception Laboratory, which she founded in 1978. She has also served as the Assistant Director of the Computer Information Science and Engineering Directorate (CISE) at the NSF. She has held professorships at Penn, Slovak Technical University and the University of California, Berkeley Dr. Bajcsy has conducted seminal research in the areas of human-centered computer control, cognitive science, robotics, computerized radiological/medical image processing and artificial vision. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, as well as the Institute of Medicine. In 2001 she was a recipient of the ACM A. Newell award, and Discover Magazine named her to its list of the 50 most important women in science in November 2002. In April 2003 she received the CRA Distinguished Service Award and in May 2003 she became a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. In 2020 she won the 2020 National Center for Women & Information Technology's Pioneer in Tech Award.
 
3Name:  Sir Tim Berners-Lee
 Institution:  World Wide Web Consortium; Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
The inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee received his B.A. from the Queen's College, Oxford University, in 1976 and was named "Young Inventor of the Year" by the Kilby Foundation in 1995. In 2007 he was awarded the Charles Stark Draper Prize ("engineering's Nobel Prize") and the Order of Merit, one of the United Kingdom's most prestigious honors. He won both the Turing Award and the Commonwealth Award in 2017. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2009. Tim Berners-Lee designed the World Wide Web to fill a particular need at the CERN laboratory, where he worked from 1984-94. Some of the high energy experiments at CERN are very large, often with more than 1,000 physicists from many countries participating. In March 1989, he completed a project proposal for a system to communicate information among researchers in the CERN High Energy Physics department, which was intended to help those having problems sharing information across a wide range of different networks, computers, and countries. The project had two main goals. The first was Open Design: that the hypertext system have an open architecture and be able to run on any computer being used at CERN, including Unix, VMS, Macintosh, and Windows. The second goal was that the system be distributed over a communications network. In the fall of 1990, Berners-Lee took about a month to develop the first web browser on a NeXT computer, including an integrated editor that could create hypertext documents. He deployed the program on his and a colleague's computers, and they were both communicating with the world's first web server at info.cern.ch on December 25, 1990. Luckily, CERN had been connected to the ARPANET through the EUnet in 1990. In August 1991, he posted a notice on the alt.hypertext newsgroup about where to download their web server and line mode browser, making it available around the world. Very shortly, it was everywhere. In a fateful decision that significantly helped the web to grow, Berners-Lee managed to get CERN to provide a certification on April 30, 1993 that the web technology and program code were in the public domain so that anyone could use and improve them. Because of this, the World Wide Web is available to everyone at no cost.
 
4Name:  Dr. Vinton G. Cerf
 Institution:  Google
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Vinton G. Cerf is vice president and chief Internet evangelist for Google. Cerf served as a senior vice president of MCI from 1994-2005, as vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives from 1986-1994, as vice president of MCI from 1982-1986, and as Principal Scientist, United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Information Processing Techniques Office from 1976-1982. Cerf was a member of the Stanford University faculty from 1972-1976. He served as chairman of the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) from 2000-2007 and was founding president of the Internet Society. Widely known as one of the "Fathers of the Internet," Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet. He received the U.S. National Medal of Technology in 1997 and the 2004 ACM Alan M. Turing Award. In November 2005, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and in April 2008 the Japan Prize. In 2018 he won a Science Award from the Franklin Institute. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, ACM, and American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Engineering Consortium, the Computer History Museum. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. He is an honorary Freeman of the City of London. Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
5Name:  Dr. Cynthia Dwork
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Cynthia Dwork, an intellectual leader in the privacy-research community in computer science, has made fundamental contributions that speak to the role of information technology in society. She is leader and a co-founder of work on "differential privacy", which provides the first satisfactory theory for how to ensure privacy protection while enabling statistical analysis of large datasets with sensitive personal information. Her foundational work in this area has had revolutionary impact in such other disciplines as statistics and technology policy. Dwork has also made fundamental contributions to cryptography and distributed algorithms, including introducing the challenge of concurrent security in cryptographic protocols, the fundamental concept of "nonmalleability" in cryptography (where an adversary should not be able to modify cryptographic communications), and the idea of using hash chains as proofs of work (an idea underlying cryptocurrencies like BitCoin). Her distributed computing paper, "Achieving consensus in the presence of partial synchrony" received the Djikstra prize. She received the Goedel Prize in 2017 and the IEEE Hamming Medal in 2019.
 
6Name:  Dr. Charles M. Geschke
 Institution:  Adobe Systems Incorporated
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1939
 Death Date:  April 16, 2021
   
 
Charles (Chuck) Geschke co-founded Adobe Systems Incorporated in 1982. A leader in the software industry for more than 40 years, Geschke retired from his position as president of Adobe in 2000 and continued to share the chairmanship of the board with Adobe’s co-founder John Warnock. Prior to co-founding Adobe Systems, Geschke formed the Imaging Sciences Laboratory at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in 1980, where he directed research activities in the fields of computer science, graphics, image processing, and optics. From 1972 to 1980, he was a principal scientist and researcher at Xerox PARC's Computer Sciences Laboratory. Before beginning full time graduate studies in 1968, he was on the faculty of the mathematics department of John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio. Geschke has actively participated on several boards of educational institutions, non-profits, technology companies, and arts organizations. From 1989 until 2007 Geschke served on Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco and chaired the board for four years beginning in 2002. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the San Francisco Symphony and the board of the Commonwealth Club of California. He also serves on the board of the Egan Maritime Foundation, the board of the National Leadership Roundtable On Church Management and the board of the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club. In 1995, Geschke was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. In 2008, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In October 2009, Geschke was awarded the 2008 National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Barack Obama. In the fall of 2010, Geschke was presented with the Marconi Society Award for scientific contributions to human progress in the field of information technology. In the spring of 2012, Geschke was elected as a member of the American Philosophical Society. Industry and business leaders, including the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Carnegie-Mellon University, the National Computer Graphics Association, and the Rochester Institute of Technology, have honored Geschke’s technical and managerial achievements. He received the regional Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 1991 and the national Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2003. In 2002, he was elected a Fellow of the Computer History Museum and in 2005 he was given the Exemplary Community Leadership Award by the NCCJ of Silicon Valley. Geschke received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Association (AeA) in 2006. In 2007, he received the John W. Gardner Leadership Award. In 2000, Geschke was ranked the seventh most influential graphics person of the last millennium by Graphic Exchange magazine. He and his wife Nancy were honored with the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Award in 2012 for their charitable endeavors. Geschke holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie-Mellon University and a M.S. in mathematics and an A.B. in Latin, both from Xavier University. He died on April 16, 2021.
 
7Name:  Dr. Barbara J. Grosz
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Barbara Grosz is Higgins Professor of Natural Sciences in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University and former Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Educated at Cornell University and at the University of California, Berkeley, she is known for her seminal contributions to the fields of natural-language processing and multi-agent systems. Dr. Grosz developed some of the earliest and most influential computational models of discourse, dialogue systems, and models of collaboration. Her work helped establish these fields of inquiry and provides the framework for several collaborative multi-agent systems and human-computer interface systems. Dr. Grosz was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2008. She is a Fellow and past President of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. She serves on the executive committee and is a former trustee of the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence. She is the recipient of the 2015 IJCAI Research Excellence Award, the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award for her groundbreaking research that crosses disciplines and for her role in the establishment and leadership of interdisciplinary institutions, the Berkeley Computer Science and Engineering Distinguished Alumna Award, as well as numerous awards from major computer science societies. In 2017 she received the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Graduate Student Council at Harvard University as well as the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Association for Computational Linguistics Dr. Grosz was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003 and was elected Vice President of the Society in 2011.
 
8Name:  Dr. John L. Hennessy
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
John L. Hennessy joined Stanford's faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He rose through the academic ranks to full professorship in 1986 and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Computer Systems Laboratory, a research and teaching center operated by the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science that fosters research in computer systems design. He served as chair of computer science from 1994 to 1996 and, in 1996, was named dean of the School of Engineering. As dean, he launched a five-year plan that laid the groundwork for new activities in bioengineering and biomedical engineering. In 1999, he was named provost, the university's chief academic and financial officer. As provost, he continued his efforts to foster interdisciplinary activities in the biosciences and bioengineering and oversaw improvements in faculty and staff compensation. In October 2000, he was inaugurated as Stanford University's 10th president. In 2005, he became the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. A pioneer in computer architecture, in 1981 Dr. Hennessy drew together researchers to focus on a computer architecture known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), a technology that has revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. In addition to his role in the basic research, Dr. Hennessy helped transfer this technology to industry. In 1984, he cofounded MIPS Computer Systems, now MIPS Technologies, which designs microprocessors. In recent years, his research has focused on the architecture of high-performance computers. Dr. Hennessy is a recipient of the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, the 2000 ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, the 2001 ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the 2013 Academic Leadership Award of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has lectured and published widely and is the co-author of two internationally used undergraduate and graduate textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy earned his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Villanova University and his master's and doctoral degrees in computer science from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
9Name:  Dr. Julia Hirschberg
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Julia Hirschberg is Percy K. and Vida L. W. Hudson Professor of Computer Science and Chair of the Computer Science Department at Columbia University. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Pennsylvania and also has a PhD in History from the University of Michigan. She worked at Bell Laboratories and AT&T Laboratories -- Research from 1985-2003 as a Member of Technical Staff and a Department Head, creating the Human-Computer Interface Research Department. She served as editor-in-chief of Computational Linguistics from 1993-2003 and co-editor-in-chief of Speech Communication from 2003-2006 and is now on the Editorial Board. She was on the Executive Board of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL) from 1993-2003, on the Permanent Council of International Conference on Spoken Language Processing (ICSLP) since 1996, and on the board of the International Speech Communication Association (ISCA) from 1999-2007 (as President 2005-2007, Advisory Council 2007--). She now serves on the IEEE Speech and Language Processing Technical Committee, the Executive Board of the Computing Research Associate (CRA), the Association for the Advancement of Artifical Intelligence (AAAI) Council, the Executive Board of the North American ACL, and the board of the CRA-W. She has been active in working for diversity at AT&T and at Columbia. She has been an AAAI fellow since 1994, an ISCA Fellow since 2008, and a (founding) ACL Fellow since 2011. She received an Honorary Doctorate (Hedersdoktor) from KTH in 2007, a Columbia Engineering School Alumni Association (CESAA) Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award in 2009, the IEEE James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award in 2011, the ISCA Medal for Scientific Achievement in 2011, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2018. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
10Name:  Dr. Eric J. Horvitz
 Institution:  Microsoft
 Year Elected:  2018
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Eric Horvitz has made extensive influential contributions to artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction research and has had major industry impact through deployed AI systems, ( he holds nearly 300 patents). He pioneered the decision-theoretic paradigm (Bayesian inference methods), leading to the probabilistic inference paradigm widely used in AI. He has pioneered predictive models related to healthcare, ecommerce, aerospace and traffic patterns. While advancing the capabilities of AI, he has also advanced the study of ethical concerns surrounding AI, including by founding Stanford’s 100 Year Study on AI. As co-founder of The Partnership on AI, he has brought together industry leaders and other notable experts to foster dialogue and education on best practices related to transparency, privacy, safety, and fairness of AI systems. In 2020 Eric Horvitz was appointed Microsoft's first ever Chief Scientific Officer, as part of a plan to bring together parts of Microsoft research under one person. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2018.
 
11Name:  Dr. Anita K. Jones
 Institution:  University of Virginia
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Anita Jones, who is now University Professor Emerita at the University of Virginia, is a computer scientist who has made significant contributions to national science and engineering policy. Her technical work focuses on protection mechanisms and secure systems that make guarantees about how information is used. Her current focus is survivable information systems and interactive, distributed computer simulation for training, analysis, and entertainment. In June 1993, when she was appointed the Director of Defense Research and Engineering for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), she assumed responsibility for the management of the DoD's Science and Technology Program, including responsibility for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and oversight of the DoD laboratories. Her duties also incorporated being the principal advisor to the Secretary of Defense for defense-related scientific and technical matters. As Director, she served in one of the nation's top technical positions and oversaw the largest defense research and development organization in the world. Jones focused the DoD program to ensure military and national preeminence in important strategic technologies while expanding the program's scope and the speed at which technology was developed and transitioned into use. Dr. Jones received her Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in 1973, joining their faculty that same year. In 1988 she moved to the University of Virginia, serving as professor and department head. She is the author of numerous papers, as well as Foundations of Secure Computation (with R. De Millo, et al, 1978). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, and was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2010. In 2011, the National Academy of Engineering presented her with the Arthur M. Bueche Award.
 
12Name:  Dr. Donald E. Knuth
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
Donald E. Knuth (B.S. and M.S., Case Institute of Technology 1960; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 1963) is Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming at Stanford University, where he supervised the Ph.D. dissertations of 28 students since becoming a professor in 1968. He is the author of numerous books, including four volumes (so far) of The Art of Computer Programming, five volumes of Computers & Typesetting, nine volumes of collected papers, and a non-technical book entitled 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated. His software systems TeX and MF are extensively used for book publishing throughout the world. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Philosophical Society, and he is a foreign associate of the French, Norwegian, Bavarian, and Russian science academies as well as the Royal Society of London. He received the Turing Award from the Association for Computing Machinery in 1974; the National Medal of Science from President Carter in 1979; the Steele Prize from the American Mathematical Society in 1986; the Adelskold Medal from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1994; the Harvey Prize from the Technion of Israel in 1995; the John von Neumann Medal from the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers in 1995; the Kyoto Prize from the Inamori Foundation in 1996; the Frontiers of Knowledge award from the BBVA Foundation in 2010; the Faraday Medal from the IET in 2011; and the Lifetime Achievement Award from Marquis Who's Who in 2017. He holds honorary doctorates from Oxford University, the University of Paris, the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the University of St. Petersburg, the University of Marne-la-Vallee, Masaryk University, St. Andrews University, Athens University of Economics and Business, the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki, the University of Tubingen, the University of Oslo, the University of Antwerp, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, the University of Bordeaux, the University of Glasgow, and nineteen colleges and universities in America.
 
13Name:  Dr. Kathleen McKeown
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
14Name:  Dr. Fernando Pereira
 Institution:  Google Inc.
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Fernando Pereira is VP and Engineering Fellow at Google, where he leads research and development in natural language understanding and machine learning. His previous positions include chair of the Computer and Information Science department of the University of Pennsylvania, head of the Machine Learning and Information Retrieval department at AT&T Labs, and research and management positions at SRI International. He received a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and has over 120 research publications on computational linguistics, machine learning, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and logic programming, as well as several patents. He was elected AAAI Fellow in 1991 for contributions to computational linguistics and logic programming, ACM Fellow in 2010 for contributions to machine learning models of natural language and biological sequences, and ACL Fellow for contributions to sequence modeling, finite-state methods, and dependency and deductive parsing. He was president of the Association for Computational Linguistics in 1993. In 2020 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Fernando Pereira was elected a member of the Americal Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
15Name:  Dr. Adi Shamir
 Institution:  Weizmann Institute of Science
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Adi Shamir is currently Paul and Marlene Borman Professorial Chair of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Applied Mathematics at the The Weizmann Institute of Science. He earned his Ph.D., The Weizmann Institute of Science, 1977. Adi Shamir is beyond doubt one of the most recognized cryptographers worldwide. He has a number of claims to fame including being a co-inventor of the RSA public-key cryptography algorithm, the father of the idea and first realization of secret sharing, the co-inventor of identity based and visual cryptography, and a major actor in what has become known as differential cryptanalysis. For over thirty years Shamir continues his visionary leadership obtaining breakthrough results in essentially all fields within cryptography, opening new research avenues towards a better understanding of both new and well established cryptographic tools. His many honors and awards include: the Baker Prize in 1986, the PIUS XI Gold Medal of the The Vatican's Pontifical Academy in 1992, the Kanellakis Prize in 1997, the Kobayashi Prize of the IEEE in 2000, the Turing award, together with Rivest and Adleman, in 2002, the Israel Prize and the Okawa Prize in 2008, the NEC Prize in 2009, the Grand Medaille of the French Académie des Sciences in 2012, and the Japan Prize in 2017. He is a member of the Israel Academy of Science (1998), the National Academy of Sciences (2005), Academia Europaea (2007), French Académie des Sciences (2015), and the Royal Society (2018). Adi Shamir was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
16Name:  Dr. Robert E. Tarjan
 Institution:  Princeton University & InterTrust Technologies, Inc.
 Year Elected:  1990
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
One of the most gifted computer scientists in the world today, Robert E. Tarjan is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University and a Senior Fellow at HP Labs. Having discovered several important graph algorithms, including Tarjan's off-line least common ancestors algorithim, Dr. Tarjan has been recognized with honors including the 1986 Turing Award, which he received jointly with John Hopcroft for "fundamental achievements in the design and analysis of algorithims and data structures." Among other awards he has also been given the Nevanlinna Prize in Information Science (1983) and the William O. Baker Medal (1984) and has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Tarjan earned his Ph.D. in 1972 from Stanford University, where he worked with Robert Floyd and Donald Knuth. Prior to joining the faculty at Princeton University in 1985, he worked at Cornell University (1972-74), the University of California, Berkeley (1973-75), Stanford University (1974-81) and New York University (1981-85) as well as for corporations such as AT&T Bell Laboratories and NEC.
 
17Name:  Dr. John E. Warnock
 Institution:  Adobe Systems, Inc.
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
John E. Warnock is Co-chairman of the Board of Directors of Adobe Systems, Inc., a company he co-founded in 1982 with Charles Geschke. Dr. Warnock was President of Adobe for his first two years and Chairman and CEO for his remaining 16 years at Adobe. Warnock has pioneered the development of graphics, publishing, Web and electronic document technologies that have revolutionized the field of publishing and visual communication. Warnock's entrepreneurial success has been chronicled by some of the country's most influential business and computer industry publications, and he has received numerous awards for technical and managerial achievement. A partial list of awards includes: University of Utah Distinguished Alumnus Award; Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Software Systems Award; the National Medal of Technology (2008); and the National Medal of Science (2009). Dr. Warnock has also received the Edwin H. Land Medal from the Optical Society of America, the Bodleian Medal from Oxford University, and the Lovelace Medal from the British Computer Society. Warnock is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He has received Honorary Degrees from the University of Utah and the American Film Institute. Warnock has been a member of the board of directors of Adobe Systems Inc., Knight-Ridder, Ebrary Inc., Netscape Communications, and Salon Media Group. His is past Chairman of the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose. He also has served on the Board of Trustees of the American Film Institute, and is on the Board of the Sundance Institute. Before co-founding Adobe Systems, Warnock was principal scientist at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Prior to joining Xerox, Warnock held positions at Evans & Sutherland Computer Corporation, Computer Sciences Corporation, IBM, and the University of Utah. Dr. Warnock hold seven patents, B.S. and M.S. degrees in mathematics and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering all from the University of Utah.
 
18Name:  Dr. William A. Wulf
 Institution:  University of Virginia
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
William Wulf was president of the National Academy of Engineering for the past eleven years. He recently returned to the University of Virginia - where he earned his Ph.D. in 1968 - as University Professor and AT&T Professor of Engineering. Previously Wulf spent thirteen years on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University and six years as chairman and chief executive officer of Tartan Laboratories, Inc. A former assistant director of the National Science Foundation, he has served on the University of Virginia faculty since 1988. For the 2008-09 academic year he is also serving as a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar. Through his technical innovations, publications, and national science policy leadership, William Wulf has had a profound impact on the science and practice of computing and engineering. His technical work revolved around the hardware/software interface that spans programming systems and computer architectures. His specific technical impacts include Bliss, a systems implementation language adopted by the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC); architecture (with others) of the DEC PDP-11, a highly successful minicomputer; a new approach to computer security; and the development of a technology for constructing high quality optimizing compilers. In addition to his many technical books and papers, he has initiated national dialogues on topics such as the state of higher education, "Engineering Ethics and Society," and "Some Thoughts on Engineering as a Humanistic Discipline." As head of the National Academy of Engineering, he has advanced and articulated the role of engineering in serving society and improving people's lives. Wulf's many honors include the University of Pennsylvania's Distinguished Service Medal; the Kenneth Andrew Roe Award; and the Ralph Coats Roe Award of the ASME. He became a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1993 and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1995. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2007.
 
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