American Philosophical Society
Member History

Results:  67 ItemsModify Search | New Search
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4Reset Page
Residency
Resident[X]
Class
1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences[X]
Subdivision
102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry[X]
61Name:  Dr. George M. Whitesides
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1997
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
George M. Whitesides is Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor at Harvard University. Educated at Harvard University and the California Institute of Technology, he was a member of the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1963-82. He returned to Harvard in 1982, serving as chairman of the Department of Chemistry from 1986-89 and Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry from 1982-2004. Dr. Whitesides is unique among chemists in the breadth and quality of both his scientific research and his involvement with government and industry. He has a remarkable record of highly influential academic research in core areas of chemistry and also in areas connecting chemistry to materials science and biology. One aim of his research is to establish intellectual connections between areas often considered essentially unrelated; the other is to make new connections between first-rate basic science and important technologies. Dr. Whitesides' current research is at the borders of chemistry, biology and materials science and includes both fundamental and applied components in molecular virology, rational drug design, glycobiology, interfacial chemistry, crystal engineering, fuel cells and nano and microfabrication technology. Yet, for all of the above, he is also a professor with a deep interest and participation in teaching, not just in his research specialties but in general science for Harvard undergraduates. In addition to numerous advisory positions and professional memberships, Dr. Whitesides is the recipient of the Kyoto Prize (2003), the Dan David Award (2004), the Priestley Medal (2006) and the Welch Award (2007). George Whitesides was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1997.
 
62Name:  Dr. Benjamin Widom
 Institution:  Cornell University
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1927
   
 
Chemist Benjamin Widom is known for his theoretical contributions to the thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of liquids (including complex liquids such as microemulsions and polymer solutions), of phase transitions and critical phenomena, and of interfaces. Currently Goldwin Smith Professor of Chemistry Emeritus at Cornell University, he received his Ph.D. from Cornell in 1953, after which time he joined the university faculty as an instructor in chemistry. He became a full professor in 1963 and chaired the chemistry department from 1978-81. Dr. Widom was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1974 and of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1979. In 1998 he was awarded the prestigious Boltzmann Medal "for his illuminating studies of the statistical mechanics of fluids and fluid mixtures and their interfacial properties, especially his clear and general formulation of scaling hypotheses for the equation of state and surface tensions of fluids near critical points."
 
63Name:  Dr. Edgar Bright Wilson
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1946
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1908
 Death Date:  7/12/92
   
64Name:  Dr. Peter Guy Wolynes
 Institution:  Rice University
 Year Elected:  2006
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Peter G. Wolynes was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1953. He completed his undergraduate studies at Indiana University, receiving an A.B. degree in 1971. He then took up the study of statistical mechanics at Harvard University, where he received his Ph.D. in chemical physics in 1976. After a brief postdoctoral study with John Deutch at MIT, Dr. Wolynes returned to Harvard as an assistant professor in 1976. During the next four years at Harvard, Dr. Wolynes worked on the dynamical theory of electrolyte solutions, as well as on the then-nascent theoretical study of molecular dynamics of proteins. His early work on the theory of chemical reaction rates in condensed phases paved the way for the explosion of theoretical developments in this area throughout the 1980s. In 1980 Dr. Wolynes moved to the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he progressed to be the Eiszner Professor of Chemistry and a Center for Advanced Study Professor of Chemistry, Physics and Biophysics. During the years he spent at Illinois, Dr. Wolynes worked on a wide range of theoretical problems in chemical physics, including the theory of the glass transition and the development of new techniques for studying quantum dynamics in condensed phases. He developed, in 1981, the quantum mechanical version of Kramers' celebrated 1940 theory of chemical reaction rates in solution. In addition, Dr. Wolynes provided a new picture of how energy flows quantum mechanically in moderate-sized molecules. Dr. Wolynes' interest in applying statistical mechanics to biology grew while he was at Illinois. He introduced energy landscape ideas to the field of protein folding, providing a statistical mechanical framework to understand how a one-dimensional sequence of amino acids folds to its native structure on a biologically relevant time-scale. These ideas have led to what has been termed the "New View" of protein folding kinetics. Energy landscapes have also proved useful in developing algorithms to predict protein structure from sequence. Dr. Wolynes' scientific contributions have been acknowledged in many ways. He received the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry in 1986, the Fresenius Award in 1988, the Peter Debye Award for Physical Chemistry in 2000 and the Biological Physics Prize of the American Physical Society in 2004. Among other external appointments, he was the Hinshelwood lecturer at Oxford in 1997 and Fogarty Scholar-in-Residence at the National Institutes of Health starting in 1994. He was elected in 1991 to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and in 2003 was elected a Fellow of the Biophysical Society. In 2000 Dr. Wolynes moved to University of California, San Diego, where he held the Francis Crick Chair in the Physical Sciences. In addition to continuing his work on many body chemical physics and protein folding he is now studying stochastic aspects of cell biology. In 2011, Dr. Wolynes moved to Rice University in Texas where he is the D.R. Bullard-Welch Foundation Professor of Science.
 
65Name:  Dr. Richard N. Zare
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1991
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
The Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science at Stanford University, Richard N. Zare is renowned for his research in the area of laser chemistry, resulting in a greater understanding of chemical reactions at the molecular level. By experimental and theoretical studies he has made seminal contributions to our knowledge of molecular collision processes and contributed very significantly to solving a variety of problems in chemical analysis. His development of laser induced fluorescence as a method for studying reaction dynamics has been widely adopted in other laboratories. Dr. Zare has received numerous honors and awards for his research and his teaching, including the National Medal of Science (1983), the American Chemical Society's Harrison Howe Award (1985) and Willard Gibbs Medal (1990) and the Wolf Prize in Chemistry (2005). He has given named lectures at numerous universities, authored and co-authored over 700 publications and more than 50 patents and published four books, including a popular textbook on the topic of angular momentum in quantum systems. A graduate of Harvard University (Ph.D., 1964), where he studied with Dudley Herschbach, Dr. Zare has previously served on the faculties of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado and Columbia University. A former chairman of the National Science Board, he was elected to the membership of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1976.
 
66Name:  Dr. Ahmed H. Zewail
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology & NSF Laboratory for Molecular Sciences
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1946
 Death Date:  August 2, 2016
   
 
Ahmed Zewail was the 1999 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He was the Linus Pauling Chair Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Physics and the Director of the Physical Biology Center at the California Institute of Technology until his death on August 2, 2016, at the age of 70. Dr. Zewail was educated in Egypt and received his B.S. and M.S. from Alexandria University and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests were directed towards the development of new methodology for understanding the dynamical behavior of life molecules in space and time. Dr. Zewail was the recipient of honors and awards from around the world, including Egyptian postage stamps issued to honor his contributions to science and humanity. He held some 30 honorary degrees in science, medicine, philosophy, law, arts and humane letters. A member of numerous international academies, Ahmed Zewail was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1998.
 
67Name:  Dr. Xiaowei Zhuang
 Institution:  Harvard University; Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1970
   
 
Xiaowei Zhuang is the David B. Arnold Professor of Science at Harvard University and an investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her laboratory has developed single-molecule, super-resolution and genomic-scale imaging methods, including STORM and MERFISH, and has used these methods to discover novel molecular structures in cells and cell organizations in tissues. Zhuang received her BS in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China, her PhD in physics in the lab of Prof. Y. R. Shen at University of California, Berkeley, and her postdoctoral training in biophysics in the lab of Prof. Steven Chu at Stanford University. She joined the faculty of Harvard University in 2001 and became a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator in 2005. Zhuang is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization, a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society. She received honorary doctorate degrees from the Stockholm University in Sweden and the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. She has received a number of awards, including the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, National Academy of Sciences Award in Scientific Discovery, Dr. H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Academy of Sciences Award in Molecular Biology, Raymond and Beverly Sackler International Prize in Biophysics, Max Delbruck Prize in Biological Physics, American Chemical Society Pure Chemistry Award, MacArthur Fellowship, etc.
 
Election Year
2022 (1)
2021 (2)
2019 (1)
2017 (1)
2016 (1)
2015 (1)
2013 (1)
2011 (3)
2007 (1)
2006 (1)
2004 (2)
2003 (2)
2002 (2)
2001 (1)
2000 (1)
1999 (2)
1998 (2)
1997 (1)
1996 (2)
1995 (2)
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4