American Philosophical Society
Member History

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102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry[X]
21Name:  Dr. H. S. Gutowsky
 Institution:  University of Illinois
 Year Elected:  1982
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  January 13, 2000
   
22Name:  Dr. F. Otto Haas
 Institution:  Rohm & Haas
 Year Elected:  1967
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1915
 Death Date:  1/2/94
   
23Name:  Dr. Norman Hackerman
 Institution:  Rice University & Robert A. Welch Foundation & University of Texas at Austin
 Year Elected:  1972
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1912
 Death Date:  June 16, 2007
   
24Name:  Dr. Eric J. Heller
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
25Name:  Dr. Dudley Robert Herschbach
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1989
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1932
   
 
Dudley Herschbach was born in San Jose, California (1932) and received his B.S. degree in Mathematics (1954) and M.S. in Chemistry (1955) at Stanford University, followed by an A.M. degree in Physics (1956) and Ph.D. in Chemical Physics (1958) at Harvard University. After a term as Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard (1957-1959), he was a member of the chemistry faculty at the University of California, Berkeley (1959-1963) before returning to Harvard as Professor of Chemistry (1963), where he was Baird Professor of Science (1976-2003) and is now an Emeritus Professor. Since 2005 he has been a Professor of Physics (fall only) at Texas A&M University. He has served as Chairman of the Chemical Physics program (1964-1977) and the Chemistry Department (1977-1980), as a member of the Faculty Council (1980-1983), and Co-Master with his wife Georgene of Currier House (1981-1986). His teaching roster includes graduate courses in quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, molecular spectroscopy, and collision theory, as well as undergraduate courses in physical chemistry and general chemistry for freshmen, his most challenging assignment. Currently he gives a freshman seminar course on Molecular Motors and an informal graduate "minicourse" on topics in chemical physics. He is engaged in several efforts to improve K-16 science education and public understanding of science. He serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of Science Service, which publishes Science News and conducts the Intel ScienceTalent Search and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Association for Women in Science, and the Royal Chemical Society of Great Britain. His awards include the Pure Chemistry Prize of the American Chemical Society (1965), the Linus Pauling Medal (1978), the Michael Polanyi Medal (1981), the Irving Langmuir Prize of the American Physical Society (1983), the Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1986), jointly with Yuan T. Lee and John C. Polanyi, the National Medal of Science (1991), the Jaroslav Heyrovsky Medal (1992), the Sierra Nevada Distinguished Chemist Award (1993), the Kosolapoff Award of the ACS (1994), and the William Walker Prize (1994). He was named by Chemical & Engineering News among the 75 leading contributors to the chemical enterprise in the past 75 years (1998). Dr. Herschbach's current research is devoted to methods of orienting molecules for studies of collision stereodynamics, means of slowing and trapping molecules in order to examine chemistry at long deBroglie wavelengths, a dimensional scaling approach to strongly correlated many-particle interactions, and theoretical analysis of molecular motors, particularly enzyme-DNA systems.
 
26Name:  Dr. Roald Hoffmann
 Institution:  Cornell University
 Year Elected:  1984
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Roald Hoffmann was born in Zloczow, Poland in 1937. Having survived the Nazi occupation, he arrived in the U.S. in 1949 after several years of post-war wandering in Europe. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School and Columbia University and proceeded to take his Ph.D. in 1962 at Harvard University, working with W. N. Lipscomb and Martin Gouterman. Dr. Hoffmann stayed on at Harvard University from 1962-1965 as a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows. Since 1965, he has been at Cornell University, where he is now the Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters and Professor of Chemistry. 'Applied theoretical chemistry' is the way Roald Hoffmann characterizes the particular blend of computations stimulated by experiment and the construction of generalized models, of frameworks for understanding, that is his contribution to chemistry. In more than 450 scientific articles and two books he has taught the chemical community new and useful ways to look at the geometry and reactivity of molecules, from organic through inorganic to infinitely extended structures. Professor Hoffmann is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and has been elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society, the Indian National Science Academy and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, among others. He has received numerous honors, including over twenty five honorary degrees and is the only person ever to have received the American Chemical Society's awards in three different specific subfields of chemistry: the A. C. Cope Award in Organic Chemistry, the Award in Inorganic Chemistry, and the Pimentel Award in Chemical Education. In 2009, in addition to being elected to fellowship, he received the American Chemical Society's James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public as well as the Public Service Award from the National Science Board of the National Science Foundation. In 1981, he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Kenichi Fukui.
 
27Name:  Dr. John J. Hopfield
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  1988
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1933
   
 
John J. Hopfield has been a professor at Princeton University since 1997 and Howard A. Prior Professor of Molecular Biology since 2001. After receiving his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University in 1957, he worked as a member of the Bell Laboratories technical staff (1958-60, 1973-89) and as a research physicist at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris (1960-61). He has served on the faculties of the University of California, Berkeley (1961-64), the California Institute of Technology (1980-97) and Princeton University (1964-80, 1997- ) and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. A scientist of considerable range, Dr. Hopfield started his career as a solid state physicist before moving into molecular biology and conducting path-breaking research in neurosciences. His areas of interest have included the electron-transfer processes important to photosynthesis; the mechanism of biological proofreading in the transcription and expression of DNA; and the relation between brain function and computers. He has received numerous honors for his work, including the APS Prize in Biophysics (1985), the Dirac Medal from the International Center for Theoretical Physics (2001), the Swartz Prize from the Society for Neuroscience (2012), and the Franklin Institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics (2019).
 
28Name:  Dr. Donald F. Hornig
 Institution:  Brown University & Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1967
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  January 21, 2013
   
 
A leader in theoretical and physical chemistry, Donald Hornig was born in 1920 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He received his doctoral degree from Harvard University in 1943 and went on to work at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and the Los Alamos Laboratory where he conceived and developed a triggered spark-gap switch to initiate the explosive lenses used to set off the implosion in the first plutonium device. Later, Dr. Hornig held teaching positions at Brown University, becoming a full professor at the age of 31, before moving to Princeton University in 1957 as chairman of the Department of Chemistry. In 1964, he was named as the science advisor to President Lyndon Johnson, fulfilling that role until 1969. He had previously served as a science advisor to Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy. After a brief term as vice president of Eastman Kodak Company, he returned to Brown as president of the university, serving in that capacity until 1976, when he became President Emeritus. Subsequently he became Professor of Chemistry in the School of Public Health at Harvard University, and from 1987-90, when he retired, he was chairman of the Department of Environmental Health in the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Hornig was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Fellowship and the Charles Lathrop Parsons Award of the American Chemical Society as well as a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Donald Hornig died January 21, 2013, at the age of 92, in Providence, Rhode Island.
 
29Name:  Dr. James G. Anderson
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
James Anderson has pioneered the development and application of instruments to determine the chemical abundance of chemical radicals in the stratosphere. He established from measurement and theory the abundance of ClO in the stratosphere and then OH, NO, and BrO. This showed unambiguously that Cl from chloroflourocarbons was the cause of the ozone depletion in the Antarctic and that ClO and BrO from industrial sources was the cause of the ozone depletion. They are the basis for quantitatively testing models of the atmosphere. These results are from the very difficult and sophisticated measurements made by him with instrumented stratospheric ballon flights. Dr. Anderson has established a world center of research with brilliant young scientists who are participating in carrying their field forward. Having been Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at Harvard Univeristy since 1978, Dr. Anderson has also served on the faculties of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Michigan. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1992); the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1985); and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1986). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado (1970).
 
30Name:  Dr. Jiri Jonas
 Institution:  Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology; University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1932
   
 
Jiri Jonas received his Ph.D. from the Czechoslovak Academy of Science in 1960. He moved to the United States in 1963 to join the faculty of the University of Illinois where he has remained throughout his career. He is now Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Professor Emeritus of the Center for Advanced Study, and Director Emeritus of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Jiri Jonas has been a pioneer in developing and using high pressure NMR to study the structure and dynamics of liquids, including liquids in small pores, the effect of compression on reaction rates in solution, and, in recent years, the conformation of protein molecules and membranes, the mechanism of protein folding and cold denaturation of proteins. In addition, as Director of the Beckman Institute for the past nine years he developed the largest university-operated organization for interdisciplinary research involving engineering, chemistry and physiological psychology. Significant useful devices have resulted. Dr. Jonas received the Hildebrand Award of the American Chemical Society and the U.S. Senior Scientist Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
31Name:  Dr. Martin D. Kamen
 Institution:  University of California, San Diego
 Year Elected:  1974
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1913
 Death Date:  August 31, 2002
   
32Name:  Dr. Jerome Karle
 Institution:  Naval Research Laboratory
 Year Elected:  1990
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  June 6, 2013
   
 
Jerome Karle was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 18, 1918. He attended New York City schools and graduated from the City College of New York in 1937. He obtained an M.A. degree in biology in 1938 at Harvard University. After working at the New York State Health Department, he attended the University of Michigan and received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physical chemistry. Jerome Karle's research was concerned with diffraction theory and its application to the determination of atomic arrangements in various states of aggregation, gaseous, liquids, amorphous solids and fibers. This research resulted in new techniques for structure determination and a broad variety of applications. His work in crystal structure analysis was recognized by the 1985 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Karle had been associated in various ways with a number of groups and organizations that are concerned with social issues. Some examples have been membership in the Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences and Advisor to ChildRight Worldwide. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1990. Jerome Karle died on June 6, 2013, at the age of 94 in Annandale, Virginia.
 
33Name:  Dr. Isabella L. Karle
 Institution:  Naval Research Laboratory
 Year Elected:  1992
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  October 3, 2017
   
 
Isabella Karle (née Lugoski) was born in Detroit, Michigan. She was the daughter of Zygmunt and Elizabeth Lugoski who had emigrated from Poland. After attending the public schools in Detroit, she was awarded a scholarship to the University of Michigan where she earned the B.S. Chem, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees with a speciality in physical chemistry. After serving as a chemist on the atomic bomb project at the University of Chicago (1944), she was an Instructor in Chemistry at the University of Michigan. After World War II, she joined the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington where she maintained an active research program as a member of the Laboratory for the Structure of Matter until July 2010. Dr. Isabella Karle's early research concerned the structure analysis of molecules in the vapor state by electron diffraction. She was instrumental in the development of a quantitative procedure by which vibrational motion as well as bond lengths and bond angles in molecules can be determined accurately. In the fifties, her research was directed toward crystal structure analysis. She developed practical procedures based on the theoretical work developed in the Laboratory for the Structure of Matter at NRL for the determination of phases directly from the measured intensities of x-ray reflections. These practical procedures have become adopted world-wide and have been essential to the explosive output of crystal structure determinations that are indispensable to the solution of problems in a number of scientific disciplines: chemistry, biochemistry, biophysics, mineralogy, material science, pharmaceuticals, drug design and medicinal chemistry, for example. There are now in excess of 20,000 published analyses per year, as compared to about 150 per year in the early 1960s. Isabella Karle personally had applied the direct method of phase determination to the early elucidation of molecular formulae and determination of conformations of steroids, alkaloids, frog toxins, photorearrangement products caused by radiation, nanotubes and particularly peptides. This type of structural information has provided the basis for computational chemistry, conformational analyses and the prediction of folding for new substances. She published more than 350 papers. The work of Dr. Karle was recognized by a number of awards and honors. Among them have been election to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She received the Garvan Award of the American Chemical Society, the Hillebrand Award, the WISE Lifetime Achievement Award, the Gregori Aminoff Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Bijvoet Medal from the Netherlands, Robert Dexter Conrad Award (ONR), the Department of Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award, and eight honorary doctorate degrees, the most recent from the Jagiellonian University (Krakow, Poland). Her first award, however, was presented by the Society of Women Engineers. She had served as President of the American Crystallographic Association, on several editorial boards of journals and a number of national committees concerned with various aspects of chemistry and crystallography. In 1993, Dr. Karle was awarded the prestigious Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science (Franklin Institute), and in 1995 she received the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences and the National Medal of Science from President Clinton. Other recognitions include her biography in "Women in Chemistry and Physics" and in "The Door in the Dream," a symposium in her honor at an American Chemical Society meeting, and honors at the New York Academy of Sciences. She received the 2007 Bruce Merrifield Award for Peptide Science. Isabella Karle died on October 2, 2017 at the age of 95.
 
34Name:  Dr. Laura L. Kiessling
 Institution:  University of Wisconsin-Madison; Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2017
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1960
   
 
Laura Lee Kiessling has made significant contributions to define intercelluar communication in bacteria and eukaryotes. Her work has led in the elucidation of carbohydrate biochemistry where she shed light on the importance of carbohydrate-cell surface interactions and on the mechanisms of cellular synthesis of complex carbohydrates. Kiessling was an early pioneer in the application of ring-opening polymerization for the preparation of polymer-glycoside conjugates with precisely defined spacing and length. Her research group provided major insight into the mechanisms by which carbohydrate molecular recognition events control cellular signaling. Her main interest currently is in finding a human lectin that recognizes microbial glycans over human glycans. Kiessling has been a leader in the application of chemical synthesis to dissect important biological questions involving multivalent carbohydrate displays.
 
35Name:  Dr. Jeremy R. Knowles
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1988
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1935
 Death Date:  April 3, 2008
   
36Name:  Dr. Samuel Lenher
 Institution:  DuPont
 Year Elected:  1964
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1905
 Death Date:  12/17/92
   
37Name:  Dr. Nelson J. Leonard
 Institution:  University of Illinois & California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1916
 Death Date:  October 9, 2006
   
38Name:  Dr. Stephen J. Lippard
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Stephen J. Lippard is the Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and studied at Haverford College (B.A. in Chemistry) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry). After a postdoctoral year at MIT during 1965-66, he joined the faculty of Columbia University where he served until moving to MIT in 1983. His research activities span the fields of inorganic chemistry, biological chemistry, and neurochemistry. Included are studies to understand and improve platinum anticancer drugs, the synthesis of dimetallic complexes as models for non-heme iron metalloenzymes, structural and mechanistic investigations of methane monooxygenase and related bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases, and inorganic neurotransmitters, especially nitric oxide and zinc. He has published 900 papers on these and other topics and has co-authored a popular textbook with Jeremy Berg entitled "Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry." He supervised the Ph. D. thesis research of 115 graduate students and more than that number of postdoctoral associates, many of whom hold significant positions in academic, industrial, or government institutions or in the medical or legal professions. His honors include the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Chemistry, National Medal of Science, the Priestley Medal (highest award bestowed by the American Chemical Society), the Centenary Medal awarded by the Royal Society of Chemistry in the UK, the Pauling Medal, the James R. Killian Jr. Faculty Achievement Award from MIT, awarded to one member of the faculty each year, the F.A. Cotton Medal for Excellence in Chemical Research, Luigi Sacconi Medal from the Italian Chemical Society, co-recipient of the first Christopher J. Fredrickson Prize for Research in the Neurobiology of Zinc, ACS Ronald Breslow Award for Achievement in Biomimetic Chemistry, and election to the U. S. National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Irish Academy, Italian Chemical Society, and the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. He holds several honorary degrees. His research on platinum complexes led to the co-founding of Blend Therapeutics in 2011. Based in Watertown, Massachusetts, Blend (now Placon Therapeutics) has recently had an IND approved by the FDA to take a new platinum compound into a Phase I clinical trial for cancer treatment.
 
39Name:  Dr. Rudolph Arthur Marcus
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  1990
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1923
   
 
One of the outstanding theoretical chemists of our time, Rudolph A. Marcus is Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1978. He earned his Ph.D. from McGill University in 1946 and later served on the faculties of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1951-64) and the University of Illinois (1964-78). He has a record of superb contributions to many fields of chemistry, especially in unimolecular and electron-transfer reactions, semiclassical theory of collisions and of bound states, intramolecular dynamics, solvent dynamics, and chemical reaction coordinates. His Marcus Equation has proven to be a general and powerful treatment of reaction rates. Dr. Marcus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1970) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1973). His many awards include the Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1992), the Wolf Prize (1985) and the National Medal of Science (1989).
 
40Name:  Dr. Tobin Jay Marks
 Institution:  Northwestern University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Tobin Jay Marks is the Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry, Professor of Material Science and Engineering, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Professor of Applied Physics at Northwestern University. He earned his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971. He has spent most of his career at Northwestern, beginning as an Assistant Professor, then full Professor, and later, the Charles E. & Emma H. Morrison Professor of Chemistry. For five decades, Marks has been on the cutting edge of chemistry. Among his most ambitious work is the development of new organic photonics and olefin-polymerization techniques that opened the door to environmentally-friendly plastics. Marks has been "a true giant in the field" Stanford University chemistry professor Richard Zare told Chemical & Engineering News in 2016 when Marks was announced as the recipient of the Priestley Medal from the American Chemical Society. Among Marks' many achievements are the creation of flexible electronic materials for use in solar cells and light-emitting diodes and developing classes of oxide thin films for use in energy efficient materials. The wide scope of his research has resulted in more than a thousand published papers and more than 230 patents. He has also mentored hundreds of students over his career. Marks' major recognitions include the U.S. National Medal of Science, the Spanish Principe de Asturias Prize, the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award, the Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences, and the Israel Harvey Prize. He is a member of the U.S., European, German, Indian, and Italian Academies of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Inventors. He is a Fellow of the U.K. Royal Society of Chemistry, the Materials Research Society, and the American Chemical Society. Marks was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2022.
 
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