American Philosophical Society
Member History

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3. Social Sciences[X]
101Name:  M. Michel Crozier
 Institution:  Center for the Sociology of Organizations
 Year Elected:  1975
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1922
 Death Date:  May 24, 2013
   
 
French sociologist Michel Crozier was founder and director of the Centre de Sociologie des Organisations in Paris. One of the world's leading authorities on modern social organization and a critical analyst of bureaucracy, Dr. Crozier became a member of the Académie des sciences morales et politiques in 1999. He was also an officer of the Légion d'honneur and a commander of the Ordre National du Mérite as well as a laureate of the Prix Tocqueville. His major works include The Bureaucratic Phenomenon (1963), The World of the Office Worker (1965), The Crisis of Democracy (1975), Strategies for Change: The Future of French Society (1979) and The Trouble with America (1980), all of which have been translated into English. He was elected an international member of the American Philosophical Society in 1975. Michel Crozier died May 24, 2013, at the age of 90 in Paris, France.
 
102Name:  Dr. Philip Curtin
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  1995
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1922
 Death Date:  June 4, 2009
   
 
Philip Curtin was born in 1922 in West Virginia. He earned a history degree from Swarthmore College in 1948 and a doctorate from Harvard University in 1953. Following a brief tenure as an assistant professor at Swarthmore, Dr. Curtin joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin in 1956, and over his 20 years there helped to establish African history as a field of academic inquiry. He has conducted extensive research on the Atlantic slave trade between 1600 and 1800, and his book The Atlantic Slave Trade (1969) became the starting point for all future research on the slave trade and comparative slavery. His innovative research significantly revised past understanding of the subject and delved for the first time into such areas as the health problems associated with the slave trade. Dr. Curtin's work eschews traditional ethnocentric perspectives in favor of the tools and techniques of economics, anthropology and history. The recipient of MacArthur and Fulbright Fellowships, Dr. Curtin was most recently professor of history at Johns Hopkins University from 1975 through his retirement in 1998.
 
103Name:  Robert E. Cushman
 Year Elected:  1949
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1889
 Death Date:  6/9/69
   
104Name:  Dr. Anne Cutler
 Institution:  University of Western Sydney, Australia
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  305
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1945
 Death Date:  June 7, 2022
   
 
Born in Australia, as a postwar baby-boomer, Anne Cutler could benefit from a little-known side-effect of the wartime disruption of Europe: the extraordinarily high quality of language teaching in 1950s Australian schools. Overqualified refugee academics surviving by teaching their native language included her Belgian high-school teacher of French, and her Austrian teacher of German (with a University of Vienna Ph.D.). This background led her to study languages - at Melbourne University, where, thanks to regulations mandating a "science subject" in BA degrees, she discovered psychology as well. Psycholinguistics, investigating language with the methods of experimental psychology, emerged as an independent discipline in nice time for her Ph.D. study (at the University of Texas). Her research has centred on the recognition of spoken language, beginning (in her Ph.D.) with the role of rhythm and intonation in comprehension; since these vary greatly across languages, this prompted her to cross-linguistic comparisons. Her most important discoveries have concerned how adult processing of spoken language is exquisitely adapted to suit the native language (making for great efficiency in listening to the native language, but difficulty in listening to structurally different foreign languages). Her research was conducted from 1982 to 1993 at the Medical Research Council's Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge, UK (which she joined after postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and the University of Sussex), and from 1993 at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, where she served as director until 2013. She is currently Research Professor at Australia's MARCS Institute at the University of Western Sydney. Her awards include the Spinoza Prize of the Dutch Science Council (1999); further, she is a member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea, the Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen, and the National Academy of Sciences (US).
 
105Name:  Dr. Robert A. Dahl
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  1960
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1915
 Death Date:  February 5, 2014
   
 
Robert Alan Dahl received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1940 and joined the faculty, teaching for more than 40 years before retiring in 1986 as the Sterling Professor of Political Science and Senior Research Scientist in Sociology. In his work he demonstrated an unusual ability to move between empirical research of a difficult and original type and, on the other hand, theoretical synthesis. His many books include Who Governs?: Democracy and Power in an American City (1961), in which he examined power structures in New Haven, Connecticut; Democracy and Its Critics (1989), in which he observed that modern countries, in lacking full citizen participation and policy control, fail to meet the ideals of a democracy; and How Democratic is the American Constitution? (2002), in which he argued that the United States Constitution is not nearly as democratic as it ought to be. Dr. Dahl was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, a corresponding member of the British Academy, and a past President of the American Political Science Association. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1960. Robert Dahl died on February 5, 2014, at age 98 in Hamden, Connecticut.
 
106Name:  Lord Ralf Dahrendorf
 Institution:  House of Lords
 Year Elected:  1977
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  June 17, 2009
   
 
An outstanding figure in sociological theory, Lord Dahrendorf is also noted for his abilities as an academic statesman and scholarly administrator. Born in Hamburg, Germany in 1929, he studied at Hamburg University, becoming a doctor of philosophy and classics in 1956. He served as professor of sociology at Hamburg, Tübingen and Konstanz between 1957 and 1969, when he became a member of the German Parliament. In 1970 he became a Commissioner in the European Commission in Brussels. With the exception of another stint in Konstanz as professor of social science from 1984-86, he has spent much of his time in the United Kingdom since 1974, when he was appointed director of the London School of Economics. He subsequently became a governor of the school in 1986 and from 1987-97 served as warden of St. Anthony's College at Oxford University. Having adopted British nationality in 1988, Lord Dahrendorf was granted a life peerage and was created Baron Dahrendorf of Clare Market in the City of Westminster by Queen Elizabeth II in 1993. He sits in the House of Lords as a crossbencher.
 
107Name:  Dr. Robert Choate Darnton
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1989
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Robert Darnton studies 18th-century France with special interest in the literary world, censorship and the history of books. In 2007 he was named director of the Harvard University Library and Pforzheimer University Professor at Harvard University, succeeding longtime library director and fellow APS member Sidney Verba. Dr. Darnton graduated from Harvard University in 1960, attended Oxford University on a Rhodes scholarship and earned a Ph.D. (D. Phil.) in history from Oxford in 1964. After working briefly as a reporter for The New York Times, he was elected to the Society of Fellows at Harvard University (1965-68). He joined the Princeton History Department in 1968, serving on the faculty for nearly 40 years. He was the Shelby Cullom Davis '30 Professor of European History until his appointment at Harvard in 2007. Throughout his career Professor Darnton has concerned himself with the literary world of Enlightenment France, often focusing not on the philosophes but on writers outside the first rank and the material they produced. Using the archives of an 18th-century Swiss publishing house, he has brought to light a vast illegal literature of philosophy, atheism and pornography that was smuggled into France in the decades before the Revolution. In the course of this work Dr. Darnton has developed an influential anthropological approach to history, has advanced novel interpretations of the French Revolution, and has helped to create the field known as "the history of the book." He also has a longstanding interest in electronic books, Web publishing, and other new media. His books include Mesmerism and the End of the Enlightenment in France (1968), The Business of Enlightenment: A Publishing History of the Encyclopédie (1979), The Literary Underground of the Old Regime (1982), The Great Cat Massacre and Other Episodes in French Cultural History (1984), The Kiss of Lamourette: Reflections in Cultural History (1989), Revolution in Print: the Press in France ,1775-1800 (1989, Daniel Roche, coeditor), The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Prerevolutionary France (1995), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and a recent memoir, Almost a Family (2011). Dr. Darnton has been the recipient of the Leo Gershoy Prize of the American Historical Association (for The Business of Enlightenment), a MacArthur Fellowship (1982-87), The Los Angeles Times Book Prize (for The Great Cat Massacre), Princeton University's Behrman Humanities Award (1987), the Gutenberg Prize (2004), the American Printing History Association Prize (2005), and the National Humanities Medal (2011). In 1999 he was named a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur, the highest award given by the French government, in recognition of his work. Dr. Darnton is currently working on two books: a study of the libelles, a genre of scandalous books involving defamation of government officials and prominent people that flourished in France in the second half of the 18th century; and a large-scale history of publishing and the book trade in late-18th-century France. Eventually he plans to write a new history of the origins of the French Revolution.
 
108Name:  Sir Partha Sarathi Dasgupta
 Institution:  University of Cambridge; St. John's College, Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Partha Dasgupta has made pathbreaking contributions to social science, particularly on connections between population growth, natural resource use, and human welfare in developing countries. His theoretical work offers deep insights into the institutional and social causes of excessive resource depletion there, while proposing effective remedial policies. Dr. Dasgupta's important research on the definition and measurement of human welfare has greatly advanced understanding of the necessary conditions for sustainable development. He has detailed the crucial roles played by life-sustaining services provided by environmental assets in poorer countries, and the institutional reforms necessary to avoid serious environmental and social collapses in those countries. Educated at the University of Cambridge (Ph.D., 1968), Dr. Dasgupta went on to teach at the London School of Economics (1978-84) and Stanford University (1989-92), where he also directed the Program on Ethics and Society, before returning to Cambridge in 1985. In 1996 he was appointed Frank Ramsey Professor of Economics at Cambridge, and in 2007 he began a six year term as A.D. White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. A member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1991); the National Academy of Sciences (2001); the Royal Economic Society (president, 1998-2001); and the Royal Society (2004), Dr. Dasgupta has also been honored with the Volvo Environment Prize (2002) and the Ecological Economics Association's Kenneth Boulding Prize (2004). In 2016 he was selected as the Tyler Prize Laureate.
 
109Name:  Dr. Paul A. David
 Institution:  Stanford University; University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Paul Allan David is Professor of Economics Emeritus and Senior Fellow of the Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. He is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Economic History in the University of Oxford, Emeritus Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. Currently he is Titular Professor of Research on the Digital Economy at l'Ecole Polytechnique and l'Ecole National Superior de Telecommunications (Paris). Dr. David is the author of more than 160 journal articles and contributions to edited volumes, as well as of the author and editor of several books including Technical Choice, Innovation and Economic Growth (1975) and The Economic Future in Historical Perspective (2003). He was among the pioneering practitioners of the "new economic history" and is known internationally for wide-ranging contributions in the fields of American economic history, economic and historical demography, and the economics of science and technology. Investigation of the conditions that give rise to "path dependence" - the persisting influence of historical events in micro- and macro-economic phenomena - is a recurring theme in his research. Two main areas of contemporary economic policy research have emerged in his work in the past two decades: the evolution of information technology standards and network industries, and the influence of legal institutions and social norms upon the funding and conduct of scientific research in the public sector, and the interactions between that latter and private sector R&D. Dr. David currently leads an international research project on the organization, performance and viability of free and open source software. Many professional honors have been bestowed upon Dr. David in the course of his career, including election as Fellow of the International Econometrics Society (1975), Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge, as Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1979), Vice-President, and President of the Economic History Association (1988-89), as Marshall Lecturer at the University of Cambridge (1992), Ordinary Fellow of the British Academy (1995), Member of Council of the Royal Economics Society (1996-2002), and Member of the American Philosophical Society (2003). He was made Professor of Economics and Economic History by the University of Oxford, "in recognition of distinction" (1997) and was awarded a Doctorate Honoris Causa by the University of Torino (2003). He serves on the Advisory Boards of Science Commons, l'Ecole Paris de l'Economie, Alta Scuola de Politechnico Milano and Turino, and on the Executive Committee of the international organization CODATA. Dr. David's extensive service as a consultant to international organizations has included work for the World Bank, the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development, the United Nations University Institute, the OECD, several directorates of the European Commission of the EU, the European Committee for Future Accelerators, the Economic and Social Research Council (U.K.), the Treasury and the Ministry of Science and Technology of New Zealand, and the German Monopolies Commission. He also has had extensive service experience as a consultant to U.S. government agencies and foundations, including the National Academy of Sciences (National Research Council), the National Science Foundation, the Departments of Commerce and Energy, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Sloan Foundation and other public and non-profit organizations. He has been a non-executive director of La Compagnie de Saint-Gobain (2002-07).
 
110Name:  John W. Davis
 Year Elected:  1924
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1937
 Death Date:  3/24/55
   
111Name:  Dr. Kingsley Davis
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1960
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1908
 Death Date:  2/27/97
   
112Name:  Dr. David Brion Davis
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  1983
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1927
 Death Date:  April 14, 2019
   
 
David Brion Davis was Sterling Professor of History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center at Yale University at the time of his retirement. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1956 and joined the faculty at Yale in 1969 after teaching previously at Dartmouth and Cornell Universities. He also served as Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University from 1969-70 and was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences from 1972-73. A brilliant and sound historian, Dr. Davis was also known as one of the best literary stylists among United States historians. He wrote several books on slavery, including a multi-volume series, The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (1966) and The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution (1975), which earned him a Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Bancroft Prize, among other honors. His other books include Homicide in American Fiction (1957) and Revolutions: American Equality and Foreign Liberations (1990). Dr. Davis also wrote frequently for The New York Review of Books. He was awarded the American Historical Association's Award for Scholarly Distinction, the Society of American Historians' Bruce Catton Award for Lifetime Achievement, and Phi Beta Kappa's Ralph Waldo Emerson Award (for Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World) in 2007. The last volume of his trilogy (which was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award), The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation, was released in 2014, the same year he was awarded the National Humanities Medal.David Brion Davis died April 14, 2019 in Guilford Connecticut at the age of 92.
 
113Name:  Edmund E. Day
 Year Elected:  1937
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1884
 Death Date:  3/23/51
   
114Name:  Sir Angus Deaton
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Angus Deaton is Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University where he has taught for more than thirty years. In March 2017 he was appointed Presidential Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California. He is the author of five books including, most recently, The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was educated there, in the Scottish borders, and at Cambridge University. He taught at the University of Bristol, where he was Professor of Econometrics, from 1976 to 1983. Over the years, his interests have included consumer behavior, econometrics, health, development, poverty, inequality, and wellbeing. His book with John Muellbauer, Economics and Consumer Behavior, has been a basic reference since its publication in 1980. His 1997 book, The Analysis of Household Surveys, is widely used by researchers in economic development. He has consulted for the World Bank, on poverty measurement and on international comparisons, and for the Gallup Organization, exploring global and national links between life evaluation, hedonic wellbeing, income and health. He was the first recipient of the Econometric Society’s Frisch Medal, and was Editor of Econometrica in the 1980s. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and was President of the American Economic Association in 2009. He holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Rome, London, St Andrews, Edinburgh, and Cyprus. In 2012, he won the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in recognition of his life’s work. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014. In 2015 he was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare. In 2016 he was knighted in the Queen's Birthday Honours list.
 
115Name:  Dr. Gerard Debreu
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  1984
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  December 31, 2004
   
116Name:  Dr. Carl N. Degler
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1985
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  December 27, 2014
   
 
Carl Degler was Margaret Byrne Professor of American History Emeritus at Stanford University at the time of his death December 27, 2014, at the age of 93. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 1968, before which time he was an instructor and professor at Vassar College (1952-68) and an instructor at Hunter College, City College of Music, Adelphi University and New York University (1947-52). The recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1972 for his book Neither Black Nor White: Slavery and Race Relations in Brazil and the United States (which also won the Bancroft and Beveridge Prizes), Dr. Degler had published extensively on subjects such as the American South, the history of women, evolutionary theory, Darwin and Darwinism in America, and the uses and limits of history. A past president of the Organization of American Historians, Dr. Degler had also been president of the American Historical Association and the Southern Historical Association and was a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1985.
 
117Name:  Dr. Stanislas Dehaene
 Institution:  Collège de France
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  305
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1965
   
 
Stanislas Dehaene was initially trained in mathematics, at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (1984), before receiving his PhD in cognitive psychology at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (1989), under the direction of psycholinguist Jacques Mehler. He simultaneously developed neuronal models of cognitive functions with molecular neurobiologist Jean-Pierre Changeux (1987-present). After a post-doctoral stay with Michael Posner at the University of Oregon, he oriented his research towards the cognitive neuroscience of language and mathematical abilities. His experiments use brain imaging methods to investigate the mechanisms of cognitive functions such as reading, calculation and language processing, with a particular interest for the differences between conscious and non-conscious processing. Since 2005, he teaches at the Collège de France, where he holds the chair of Experimental Cognitive Psychology. He also directs the INSERM-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit at NeuroSpin in Saclay, just south of Paris -- France’s advanced neuroimaging research center.
 
118Name:  Fredric A. Delano
 Year Elected:  1935
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1864
 Death Date:  3/28/53
   
119Name:  Professor Mireille Delmas-Marty
 Institution:  French Academy of Moral and Political Sciences; Collège de France
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1941
 Death Date:  February 12, 2022
   
 
Mireille Delmas-Marty is a French jurist, honorary professor at the Collège de France and a member of the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences of the French Institute. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Paris II in 1969. She has been a leader in European law reform projects, including the Criminal Code Reform Commission. She presided over the commission on “Criminal Justice and Human Rights” and coordinated the Committee of Experts of the European Union on the project “Corpus Juris.” She developed new standards that found a place in the work of the Supervisory Committee of the European Anti-Fraud Office. She has participated in the landmark effort for the President of the French Republic to revise the Constitution in 1992, the reform of the Penal Code in 1981 and the reform of criminal procedure in 1988. She is one of the international leaders in the comparative study of criminal law. Mireille Delmas-Marty's publications include: Les grands systèmes de politique criminelle, 1992; Le flou du droit, 1986; Pour un droit commun, 1994; Trois défis pour un droit mondial, 1998; Libertés et sureté dans un monde dangereux, 2010; Les forces imaginantes du droit, série en 4 volumes: Le relatif et l’universel, (2004), Le Pluralisme ordonné, (2006), La refondation des pouvoirs, (2007), Vers une communauté de valeurs?, (2011); Résister, responsabiliser, anticiper, 2013; Le travail à l’heure de la mondialisation, 2013; Aux quatre vents du monde, petit guide de navigation sur l’océan de la mondialisation, 2016. Her honors include: National Order of Merit (France), 2003; Beccaria Prize, International Society of Social Defense, 2007; Jeschek Prize, International Association of Penal Law, 2008; Prominent Woman in International Law Award, American Society of International Law, 2012; Grand Officer, Franch Order of the Legion of Honour, 2016. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2021.
 
120Name:  Dr. Philip J. Deloria
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Philip J. Deloria is the Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University, where his research and teaching focus on the social, cultural and political histories of the relations among American Indian peoples and the United States, as well as the comparative and connective histories of indigenous peoples in a global context. He is the Chair of the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), traced the tradition of white “Indian play” from the Boston Tea Party to the New Age movement, while his 2004 book Indians in Unexpected Places examined the ideologies surrounding Indian people in the early twentieth century and the ways Native Americans challenged them through sports, travel, automobility, and film and musical performance. He is the co-editor of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (with Neal Salisbury) and C.G. Jung and the Sioux Traditions by Vine Deloria (with Jerome Bernstein). Co-authored with Alexander Olson, American Studies: A User’s Guide (2017), offers a comprehensive treatment of the historiography and methodology of the field of American Studies. His most recent book is Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract (2019), which reclaims a previously unknown Native artist while offering a new exploration of American Indian visual arts of the mid-twentieth century. Deloria received the Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in 1994, taught for six years at the University of Colorado, and then at the University of Michigan from 2001 to 2017, before joining the faculty at Harvard in January 2018. At Michigan, he served as the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, Director of the Program in American Culture, and of the Native American Studies Program, and held the Carroll Smith-Rosenberg Collegiate Chair. His courses have included American Indian history, Environmental history, the American West, and American Studies methods, as well as Food Studies, Songwriting, and Big History. Deloria is a trustee of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, where he served for many years as chair of the Repatriation Committee. He is former president of the American Studies Association, an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the recipient of numerous prizes and recognitions and will serve as president of the Organization of American Historians in 2022.
 
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