American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
International (12)
Resident (55)
Class
3. Social Sciences[X]
Subdivision
301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology[X]
1Name:  Dr. Georges Balandier
 Institution:  Universite Rene Descartes & l' Ecole des Hautes
 Year Elected:  1976
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  October 5, 2016
   
 
A comparative anthropologist in the great French tradition, Georges Balandier was born in France in 1920. He completed his doctoral studies at the Sorbonne in 1946, became a professor of sociology there in 1962. Through UNESCO and similar agencies, he was a leading international figure in comparative structural studies. The author of important works such as Sociologie Actuelle de l'Afrique Noire and Sens et Puissance, Dr. Balandier was the recipient of the Chevalier des Palmes Academiques and the Medaille du Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, among other awards. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1976. He died October 5, 2016, at age 95 in Paris, France.
 
2Name:  Dr. Daniel Bell
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1978
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  January 15, 2011
   
 
Daniel Bell was a sociologist and professor emeritus at Harvard University and a former scholar in residence of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He taught sociology at the University of Chicago from 1945-48 and Columbia University from 1952-69. He was also known for his contributions as an editor to The Public Interest Magazine, Fortune and The New Leader as well as for his studies of post-industrialism. Dr. Bell's influential books include The End of Ideology (1960), The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism (1976) and The Coming of Post-Industrial Society (1973). The End of Ideology and The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism appeared on the Times Literary Supplement's list of the 100 most important books of the second half of the twentieth century. Dr. Bell has long theorized on a new kind of society that would be information-led and service-oriented. A perceptive and imaginative student of changing contemporary society, Dr. Bell has seen many of his forecasts come true.
 
3Name:  Dr. Robert Bellah
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1927
 Death Date:  July 30, 2013
   
 
Robert N. Bellah was Elliott Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He was educated at Harvard University, receiving his B.A. in 1950 and his Ph.D. in 1955. He began teaching at Harvard in 1957 before moving to the University of California, Berkeley ten years later. From 1967-97 he served as UC Berkeley Ford Professor of Sociology and also chaired the Center for Japanese and Korean Studies from 1968-74. Dr. Bellah was the author and editor of several essays and books, including the influential articles "Civil Religion in America" (1967) and "Religious Evolution" (1964), the latter of which he transformed into a book. His books include Tokugawa Religion, Beyond Belief, The Broken Covenant, The New Religious Consciousness, Varieties of Civil Religion and Uncivil Religion: Interreligious Hostility in America, and Religion in Human Evolution (2011). In 1985, the University of California Press published Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life , a cultural analysis of American society that Professor Bellah wrote in collaboration with Richard Madsen, William Sullivan, Ann Swidler and Steven Tipton. In 1991 he published a follow-up, The Good Society, written by the same five authors as Habits of the Heart. Dr. Bellah was known for his studies of the relations between religion and related value systems and social functioning and individual development in the United States; his sociological studies were suffused with concern for public morality and the search for deep-rooted community. Among his many honors, Dr. Bellah received the United States National Humanities Medal in 2000. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1996. Robert Bellah died July 30, 2013, at the age of 86, in Oakland, California.
 
4Name:  Dr. Reinhard Bendix
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  1977
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1916
 Death Date:  2/28/91
   
5Name:  Dr. Peter M. Blau
 Institution:  University of North Carolina
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  March 12, 2002
   
6Name:  Dr. Lawrence D. Bobo
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Lawrence D. Bobo is the W. E. B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University. He holds appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Department of African and African American Studies. His research focuses on the intersection of social inequality, politics, and race. Professor Bobo is an elected member of the National Academy of Science as well as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a Guggenheim Fellow, an Alphonse M. Fletcher Sr. Fellow, a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar. He has received research grants from the National Science Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Spencer Foundation. He has held tenured appointments in the sociology departments at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the University of California, Los Angeles, and at Stanford University where he was Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Social Psychology Quarterly, and Public Opinion Quarterly. He is a founding editor of the Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race published by Cambridge University Press. He is co-author of the award winning book Racial Attitudes in America: Trends and Interpretations (Harvard University Press, 1997, with H. Schuman, C. Steeh, and M. Krysan) and senior editor of Prismatic Metropolis: Inequality in Los Angeles (Russell Sage Foundation, 2000, with M. L. Oliver, J. H. Johnson, and A. Valenzuela). His most recent book Prejudice in Politics: Group Position, Public Opinion, and the Wisconsin Treaty Rights Dispute (Harvard University Press, 2006, with M. Tuan) was a finalist for 2007 C. Wright Mills Award. He is currently working on the "Race, Crime, and Public Opinion" project. Lawrence D. Bobo was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
7Name:  Dr. Paul J. Bohannan
 Institution:  University of Southern California
 Year Elected:  1970
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  July 13, 2007
   
8Name:  Dr. Jerome Bruner
 Institution:  New York University
 Year Elected:  1982
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1915
 Death Date:  June 5, 2016
   
 
Psychologist Jerome Bruner was a prolific contributor of original ideas and research findings on perception, cognition, attention, learning, memory and early language acquisition and problem solving in young children. Born in New York City and educated at Duke and Harvard Universities, he worked as a social psychologist during World War II before becoming a professor of psychology at Harvard and cofounder and director of the Center for Cognitive Studies. In the 1940s Dr. Bruner worked with Leo Postman to study the ways in which needs, motivations and expectations influence perception, and later in the 1950s he became interested in studying aspects of schooling in the United States. The result of this latter quest, the landmark book The Process of Education (1960), had a direct effect on American educational policy, as it portrayed young students as active problem solvers who were ready to explore difficult subjects. Dr. Bruner developed his theory of cognitive growth throughout the 1960s and went on to become a professor of experimental psychology at Oxford University, where he began a series of explorations of children's language. He returned to Harvard University in 1979 and two years later joined the faculty of the School for Social Research in New York. He turned his attention to cultural psychology in later years, most significantly in his 1996 book The Culture of Education. Since 1986 he worked on cultural-psychological foundations of the law and teaching at the New York University School of Law, where he was University Professor. Jerome Bruner died June 5, 2016, at age 100, in Manhattan, New York.
 
9Name:  Dr. Craig Calhoun
 Institution:  Arizona State University
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Craig Calhoun is University Professor of Social Sciences at Arizona State University. He had served as President of the Social Science Research Council from 1999 to 2012, while also University Professor of Social Sciences and Director of the Institute of Public Knowledge at New York University. From 2012 to 2016, he was Director of the London School of Economics and Social Science, after which he was President of the Beggruen Institute from 2016 until 2018. Calhoun received his doctorate from Oxford University and has also been a professor and dean at the University of North Carolina and a visiting professor in Asmara, Beijing, Khartoum, Oslo, Paris, and Berlin. Under Calhoun’s leadership, the SSRC initiated major projects on public social science, global security and cooperation, gender and conflict, digital media and learning, the privatization of risk, religion and the public sphere, intellectual property rights, humanitarian emergences, HIV/AIDS, the social sciences in Africa, trans-regional integration in Asia, and a range of other issues. It has also substantially increased the number of fellowships it offers annually. As an individual scholar Calhoun has done research on a variety of themes in historical sociology, political economy, social movements, social theory, and the history of social sciences. His publications include The Roots of Radicalism: Tradition, the Public Sphere, and Early 19th Century Social Movements (Chicago 2012), Nations Matter: Culture, History, and the Cosmopolitan Dream (Routledge 2007), Nationalism (Minnesota 1997), Critical Social Theory: Culture, History and the Problem of Specificity (Blackwell, 1995), and Neither Gods Nor Emperors: Students and the Struggle for Democracy in China (California 1994). Calhoun edited a three-volume collection, Possible Futures (NYU 2011), which explores the impact of financial crisis, the challenges of global governance addressing issues from war to climate change, and the future of development.
 
10Name:  Dr. Donald Thomas Campbell
 Institution:  Lehigh University
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1916
 Death Date:  5/6/96
   
11Name:  Prof. Ansley J. Coale
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  1963
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1917
 Death Date:  November 5, 2002
   
12Name:  Dr. James S. Coleman
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  1970
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  3/25/95
   
13Name:  Dr. Karen S. Cook
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2018
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
KAREN S. COOK is the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology and Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford University. She is also the founding Director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRiSS) at Stanford and a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation. Professor Cook has a long-standing interest in social exchange, social networks, social justice and trust in social relations. She has edited a number of books in the Russell Sage Foundation Trust Series including Trust in Society (2001), Trust and Distrust in Organizations: Emerging Perspectives (with R. Kramer, 2004), eTrust: Forming Relations in the Online World (with C. Snijders, V. Buskens, and Coye Cheshire, 2009), and Whom Can Your Trust? (with M. Levi and R. Hardin, 2009). She is co-author of Cooperation without Trust? (with R. Hardin and M. Levi, 2005). She has served on numerous National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine committees, including the council, and currently is a member of the DBASSE advisory committee. She also serves as chair of the NSF advisory committee for the social, behavioral and economic sciences (SBE). In 1996, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2007 to the National Academy of Sciences. In 2004 she received the ASA Social Psychology Section Cooley Mead Award for Career Contributions to Social Psychology. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2018. Karen Cook conducts research on social interaction, social networks, social exchange, and trust. She is among the foremost scholars who have researched the role of trust dynamics in shaping organizational and institutional outcomes. Her early work focused on how power differentials shaped processes of social exchange within organizations and between individuals within networks, criticizing microeconomic theory for overlooking the social structures within which actors are embedded. Her latest work focuses on the origins and generation of trust in human society and its role in promoting effective use of social capital. In particular, she has done much influential research on the role of interpersonal and social relations in physician-patient relations. She argues that a general trust of others liberates people from safe but closed relationships and facilitates the creation of social capital in a variety of human domains.
 
14Name:  Dr. Lee J. Cronbach
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1967
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1916
 Death Date:  October 1, 2001
   
15Name:  M. Michel Crozier
 Institution:  Center for the Sociology of Organizations
 Year Elected:  1975
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1922
 Death Date:  May 24, 2013
   
 
French sociologist Michel Crozier was founder and director of the Centre de Sociologie des Organisations in Paris. One of the world's leading authorities on modern social organization and a critical analyst of bureaucracy, Dr. Crozier became a member of the Académie des sciences morales et politiques in 1999. He was also an officer of the Légion d'honneur and a commander of the Ordre National du Mérite as well as a laureate of the Prix Tocqueville. His major works include The Bureaucratic Phenomenon (1963), The World of the Office Worker (1965), The Crisis of Democracy (1975), Strategies for Change: The Future of French Society (1979) and The Trouble with America (1980), all of which have been translated into English. He was elected an international member of the American Philosophical Society in 1975. Michel Crozier died May 24, 2013, at the age of 90 in Paris, France.
 
16Name:  Lord Ralf Dahrendorf
 Institution:  House of Lords
 Year Elected:  1977
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  June 17, 2009
   
 
An outstanding figure in sociological theory, Lord Dahrendorf is also noted for his abilities as an academic statesman and scholarly administrator. Born in Hamburg, Germany in 1929, he studied at Hamburg University, becoming a doctor of philosophy and classics in 1956. He served as professor of sociology at Hamburg, Tübingen and Konstanz between 1957 and 1969, when he became a member of the German Parliament. In 1970 he became a Commissioner in the European Commission in Brussels. With the exception of another stint in Konstanz as professor of social science from 1984-86, he has spent much of his time in the United Kingdom since 1974, when he was appointed director of the London School of Economics. He subsequently became a governor of the school in 1986 and from 1987-97 served as warden of St. Anthony's College at Oxford University. Having adopted British nationality in 1988, Lord Dahrendorf was granted a life peerage and was created Baron Dahrendorf of Clare Market in the City of Westminster by Queen Elizabeth II in 1993. He sits in the House of Lords as a crossbencher.
 
17Name:  Dr. Kingsley Davis
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  1960
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1908
 Death Date:  2/27/97
   
18Name:  Dr. Matthew Desmond
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1980
   
 
Matthew Desmond is the is the Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology at Princeton University. After receiving his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he joined the Harvard Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow. He is the author of five books, including Poverty, by America, which will be published in 2023, and Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, which won the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, and Carnegie Medal, and PEN / John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction. The director of The Eviction Lab, Desmond's research focuses on poverty in America, city life, housing insecurity, and public policy. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, and the William Julius Wilson Early Career Award. A Contributing Writer for the New York Times Magazine, Desmond was listed in 2016 among the Politico 50, as one of "fifty people across the country who are most influencing the national political debate."
 
19Name:  Dr. Paul DiMaggio
 Institution:  New York University; Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Paul DiMaggio is Professor of Sociology at New York University, where he is also affiliated with the Center for Data Science, The Wagner School of Public Policy and the Stern School of Business. Between 1992 and January 2016, he taught at Princeton University, where he is currently A. Barton Hepburn Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs and where he served terms as Chairman and Director of Graduate Studies of the Sociology Department, Director of the Center for the Study of Social Organization, and Research Director of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies. In 1979, he went to Yale University as a Postdoctoral Fellow, later rising from Assistant Professor to Professor in the Sociology Department and the School of Management and serving as Director of the Program on Non-Profit Organizations. DiMaggio’s work has addressed such topics as the impact of cultural capital on educational attainment, the origins of the strong distinction between high culture and popular culture in the United States, the structure of organizational fields and factors that lead organizations within a field to become more similar over time, cultural politics (including arts policy, opinion polarization on social issues, and nationalism) in the United States, the role of networks in consumer decision making, the implications of cognitive science for the sociology of culture, the impact of network externalities for social inequality, and applications of computational text analysis to the study of cultural change. A graduate of Swarthmore College, he received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University.
 
20Name:  Dr. Otis Dudley Duncan
 Institution:  University of California, Santa Barbara
 Year Elected:  1973
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  November 16, 2004
   
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