American Philosophical Society
Member History

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3. Social Sciences[X]
1Name:  Dr. Anita L. Allen
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania Carey School of Law
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Anita LaFrance Allen (aka Allen-Castellitto) is the Henry R. Silverman Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. A graduate of New College, Florida and Harvard Law School with a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Michigan, Allen is an expert on privacy and data protection law, bioethics and public philosophy. She holds an honorary doctorate from Tilburg University and the College of Wooster. She is a member of the Pennsylvania and New York state bars, and briefly practiced law with Cravath, Swaine & Moore. Allen began writing about privacy and data protection in the 1980’s and has remained a distinctive voice in defense of ethical, liberal, egalitarian and inclusive approaches to privacy regulation in the digital age. In 2022 Allen was presented the Privacy Award of the Berkeley Law and Technology Center and holds a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Electronic Privacy Information Center. Allen has lectured on privacy and ethics in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, and Israel. She has published five books (including Uneasy Access, Why Privacy Isn’t Everything, and Unpopular Privacy), several textbooks (including Privacy Law and Society), and over 120 scholarly articles and chapters; contributed to and been featured in popular newspapers, magazines, podcasts and blogs; and appeared on numerous television and radio programs. Allen has been a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Harvard Law, Yale Law, Villanova Law, Fordham Law, Tel Aviv Law, Waseda Law, and the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford. In 2024 Allen will be the Hart Fellow at University College, Oxford, and also give the H.L. A. Hart Memorial Lecture at Oxford. At Penn she is a faculty affiliate of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition, the Warren Center for Network & Data Sciences and a Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics. She formerly served for seven years as Penn’s Vice Provost for Faculty and chaired the Provost’s Arts Advisory Council. In 2019 Allen was the elected President of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association (APA). In 2021 she was awarded the Philip Quinn Prize by the APA for service to philosophy and philosophers. She is an elected member of the American Law Institute, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Allen was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2022. Allen served under President Barack Obama as a member of the National Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. Allen has advised the School for Criticism and Theory at Cornell and has served on the executive committees of the Association of American Law School and Association for Practical and Applied Ethics. Allen’s scholarly journal editorial board service has included Ethics, Hypatia, and the Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics and the American Journal of Bioethics. Allen has a deep history of non-profit Board of Directors leadership with the National Constitution Center, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the Future of Privacy Forum, the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington, and, local to Philadelphia, the Maternity Care Coalition, and the West Philadelphia Alliance for Children. Born in Port Townsend, Washington, Allen is the daughter of Grover C. Allen and Carrye M. Cloud Allen of Atlanta, one of six children. She is married to retired attorney Paul V. Castellitto of Mt. Vernon and New Rochelle, New York, and has two children. She is a member of the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church and enjoys gardening, travel and the visual arts. Allen is the first African American woman to hold both a PhD in philosophy and a law degree, and the first to be a president of the American Philosophical Association.
 
2Name:  Dr. Matthew Desmond
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1980
   
 
Matthew Desmond is the is the Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology at Princeton University. After receiving his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he joined the Harvard Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow. He is the author of five books, including Poverty, by America, which will be published in 2023, and Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, which won the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, and Carnegie Medal, and PEN / John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction. The director of The Eviction Lab, Desmond's research focuses on poverty in America, city life, housing insecurity, and public policy. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, and the William Julius Wilson Early Career Award. A Contributing Writer for the New York Times Magazine, Desmond was listed in 2016 among the Politico 50, as one of "fifty people across the country who are most influencing the national political debate."
 
3Name:  Dr. Elizabeth Hinton
 Institution:  Yale Law School, Yale University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1983
   
 
Elizabeth Hinton is Associate Professor in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale University, with a secondary appointment as Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Considered one of the nation’s leading experts on criminalization and policing, Hinton’s research focuses on the persistence of poverty, racial inequality, and urban violence in the 20th century United States. In her first book, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America (Harvard University Press), Hinton examines the implementation of federal law enforcement programs beginning in the mid-1960s that transformed domestic social policies and laid the groundwork for the expansion of U.S. policing and prison regimes. From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime received numerous awards and recognition, including the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award from the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Her recent book, America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s (Liveright 2021), won a Robert F. Kennedy book award. America on Fire provides a new framework for understanding the problem of police abuse and the broader, systemic repression of Black people and other people of color in post-civil rights America. Both From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime and American on Fire were named New York Times Notable books. Before joining the Yale faculty, Hinton was a Professor in the Department of History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. She spent two years as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Michigan Society of Fellows and Assistant Professor in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. A Ford Foundation and Carnegie Corporation Fellow, Hinton completed her Ph.D. in United States History from Columbia University in 2013. Hinton’s articles and op-eds can be found in the pages of Science, the Journal of American History, the Journal of Urban History, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, The Boston Review, The Nation, and Time. She also coedited The New Black History: Revisiting the Second Reconstruction (Palgrave Macmillan 2011) with the late historian Manning Marable.
 
4Name:  Dr. Desmond King
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
 
Desmond King is the Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government at the University of Oxford, a Fellow of Nuffield College, and an Emeritus Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford. He is a leading scholar of the executive and federal government in US politics, racial inequality, immigration, illiberal forms of government policy often studied comparatively and the politics of social citizenship. His work is both normative and empirical. Drawing on new archival work, his books have documented how the federal government’s employment policies fostered segregation of African Americans in the century to 1975, and the extent to which the US’s founding institutions facilitated persistent discrimination. Subsequent empirical research studies federal responses to the financial crisis of 2008-09 and the rise of unitary executive theory. Professor King was born and educated in Ireland, where he graduated from Trinity College, Dublin. After graduate studies at Northwestern University he held lectureships at the University of Edinburgh and the London School of Economics and Political Science before moving to Oxford University. His publications include Separate and Unequal: African Americans and the US Federal Government (1995/2007), Actively Seeking Work: The Politics of Workfare in the US and Britain (1995), In the Name of Liberalism: Illiberal Social Policy in the US and Britain (1999), Making Americans: Immigration, Race and the Origins of the Diverse Democracy (2000), with Rogers M. Smith Still a House Divided: Race and Politics in Obama’s America (2011), with Lawrence Jacobs Fed Power: How Finance Wins (2016), and with Stephen Skowronek and John Dearborn, Phantoms of a Beleaguered Republic: The Deep State and the Unitary Executive (2021). He was awarded a DLitt by Oxford in 2015, and he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2003, the Royal Irish Academy in 2014, the Royal Historical Society in 2015, the Academia Europaea in 2016, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2017.
 
5Name:  Dr. David I. Laibson
 Institution:  Harvard University; National Institutes of Health
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1966
   
6Name:  Dr. Jennifer Richeson
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2022
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  305
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1972
   
 
Jennifer A. Richeson is the Philip R. Allen Professor of Psychology and Director of the Social Perception and Communication Laboratory at Yale University. For over 20 years, she has conducted research on the social psychology of cultural diversity. Specifically, she examines processes of mind and brain that influence the ways in which people experience diversity, with a primary focus on the dynamics that create, sustain, and sometimes challenge societal inequality. Much of her recent research considers the political consequences of the increasing racial/ethnic diversity of the United States. Richeson also investigates how people reason about and respond to different forms of inequality and the implications of such processes for detecting and confronting injustice. Professor Richeson’s empirical and theoretical work has been published in numerous scholarly journals and has been featured in popular publications such as the Economist and the New York Times. She has been recognized with many honors and awards, including a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship for her work "highlighting and analyzing major challenges facing all races in America and in the continuing role played by prejudice and stereotyping in our lives." Professor Richeson is also the recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Association (APA), the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, the Career Trajectory Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, the Nalini Ambady award for excellence in mentoring from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and the SAGE–CASBS award. Professor Richeson is an elected member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2019 she received an honorary doctorate from Brown University for work that “expands the boundaries of knowledge on interracial interaction and the living contexts of diversity.” Richeson was born and raised in Baltimore, MD. She earned a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Brown University, and a MA and PhD in social psychology from Harvard University. Prior to joining the Yale faculty in 2016, Richeson held faculty appointments at Northwestern University and Dartmouth College. Through her teaching, writing, and research, Professor Richeson aims to discover promising interventions that will enable us to foster and maintain culturally diverse environments that are cohesive, equitable, and just. Selected Recent Publications Richeson, J.A. 2020 (September). The mythology of racial progress. The Atlantic Magazine Onyeador, I.N., Daumeyer, N.M., Rucker, J.M., Duker, A., Kraus, M.W., & Richeson, J.A. 2020. Disrupting beliefs in racial progress: Reminders of persistent racism alter perceptions of past, but not current, racial economic equality. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. McDermott, M., Knowles, E.D., & Richeson, J.A. 2019. Class perceptions and attitudes towards immigration and race among working-class Whites. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy. Daumeyer, N.M., Onyeador, I.N., Brown, X., & Richeson, J.A. 2019. Consequences of attributing discrimination to implicit vs. explicit bias. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Kraus, M.W., Onyeador, I.N., Daumeyer, N.M., Rucker, J.M., & Richeson, J.A. 2019. The misperception of racial economic inequality. Perspectives on Psychological Science. Craig, M.A., Rucker, J.M., & Richeson, J.A. 2018. Racial and political dynamics of an approaching “majority-minority” United States. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 677(1): 204-214. Destin, M., Rheinschmidt-Same, M., & J.A. Richeson. 2017. Status-based identity: A conceptual approach integrating the social psychological study of socioeconomic status and identity. Perspectives in Psychological Science, 12(2): 270-89. McCall, L., Burk, D., Laperrière, M., & Richeson, J.A. 2017. Exposure to rising inequality shapes Americans’ beliefs about opportunity and policy support. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(36): 9593-98. Levy, D.J., Heissel, J., Richeson, J.A. & E.K. Adam. 2016. Psychological and biological responses to race-based social stress as pathways to disparities in educational outcomes. American Psychologist, 71(6): 455-73. Richeson, J., and S. Sommers. 2016. Race relations in the 21st Century. Annual Review of Psychology, 67: 439-63. Craig, M.A., and J.A. Richeson. 2016. Stigma-based solidarity: Understanding the psychological foundations of conflict & coalition among members of different stigmatized groups. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 25(1): 21-27. Rotella, K., J. Richeson and D. McAdams. 2015. Groups’ Search for Meaning: Redemption on the path to intergroup reconciliation. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 18(5): 696-715.
 
Election Year
2022[X]