American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
International (1)
Resident (2)
Class
3. Social Sciences[X]
Subdivision
303. History Since 1715[X]
1Name:  Dr. Nicholas Canny
 Institution:  Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Nicholas Canny, a historian, has been a Member of the Scientific Council of the European Research Council since 2011. He held an Established Chair in History at the National University of Ireland, Galway, 1979-2009, where he also served as Founding Director of the Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities, 2000-11, and as Vice President for Research, 2005-8. He was President of the Royal Irish Academy 2008-11and in 2020 received it's highest honor, the Cunningham Medal. He is a Member of Academia Europaea, a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy and of the Real Academia de la Historia (Madrid). He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2007. He has been a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; professeur invité at the École des Hautes Études, Paris, and was Parnell Senior Research Fellow at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, 2005-6. An expert on early modern history broadly defined, he edited the first volume of The Oxford History of the British Empire (1998) and, with Philip D. Morgan, edited The Oxford Handbook of the Atlantic World, c1450-c1850 (2011). His major book is Making Ireland British, 1580-1650 (Oxford, 2001), for which he was awarded the Irish Historical Research Prize 2003; a prize he had previously won in 1976 for his first book The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland: a Pattern Established, 1565-76. He was invited to give the Raleigh Lecture for 2011 to the British Academy which has been published as ‘A Protestant or Catholic Atlantic World? Confessional Divisions and the Writing of Natural History’ in Proceedings of the British Academy, vol. 181, pp. 83-121.
 
2Name:  Dr. John W. Dower
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
John Dower has been Ford International Professor of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 2003. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University and has also taught at the University of Wisconsin and the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Dower has achieved remarkable success in four areas: academic writing on modern Japanese history; writing for popular audiences; curriculum development; and public spokesman on current affairs related to East Asian and United States security policies. His books have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Bancroft Prize, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. They include Empire and Aftermath: Yoshida Shigeru and the Japanese Experience, 1878-1954 (1979); War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War (1986); and Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II (1999). In over 15 years at MIT, Dr. Dower has shaped the institute's history curriculum and has taught popular courses on Japanese history and World War II.
 
3Name:  Dr. Jack Rakove
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Jack Rakove is the Coe Professor of History and American Studies and a professor of politial science at Stanford University. Long a leading authority on American constitutional, political, and legal history, he is the author of more than sixty scholarly articles critically analyzing issues from the Revolution to the early years of the Republic. Central to his work has been the analysis of the constitutional concept of "original intent." His books on the subject have won several prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1997. He is also the author of an interpretive history of the Continental Congress and the American Library's edition of James Madison's writings. In line with his commitment to the public value of such scholarly issues, aside from his vigorous classroom teaching, he has, over the course of twenty years, also published scores of articles on constitutional and legal issues in major newspapers around the nation. His book The Annotated U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence is intended to continue his legacy of making constitutional issues available to the lay public, and his 2010 book Revolutionaries takes a look at the individual transformations made by both the well-known and the less well-known founders of America.
 
Election Year
2007[X]