American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
International (9)
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4. Humanities (26)
Subdivision
403. Cultural Anthropology[X]
21Name:  Dr. Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway
 Institution:  Bryn Mawr College
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1929
   
 
Brunilde Ridgway is the Rhys Carpenter Professor Emerita of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College. Born and educated in Italy, she received a Laurea in Lettere Classiche from the University of Messina in 1953. Earning her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Bryn Mawr, she joined the faculty there in 1957 as an assistant instructor and remained at the College until her retirement in 1994. Dr. Ridgway is a meticulous scholar, a dynamic and dedicated teacher and a passionate advocate of modern critical appreciation of ancient art. With a specialty in Greek sculpture, her understanding of the cultural context and talent for guiding the mind and eye have made seminal contributions to modern awareness of the meaning and quality of ancient works of art in civic, religious and architectural settings, and their impact on contemporaries as well as postclassical generations. In addition to a vigorous teaching and lecture schedule, Brunilde Ridgway is the author or coauthor of sixteen books, including a now three-volume set entitled Hellenistic Sculpture which covers the period from 331 to 31 B.C. She has also published 101 articles and 124 book reviews and, from 1977 to 1985, served as Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Archaeology. She delivered the 1981-82 Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures at the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome and the 1996 Sather Classical Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Ridgway is the recipient of the 1988 Gold Medal from the Archaeological Institute of America and of honorary degrees from Union College and Georgetown University. Her teaching awards include the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (1981) and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education's National Gold Medal as well as the title of Pennsylvania Professor of the Year (1989). Dr. Ridgway was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1993. In 2006 she was awarded the Society's 2006 Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities for her work "The Study of Greek Sculpture in the Twenty-first Century".
 
22Name:  Dr. Jeremy A. Sabloff
 Institution:  Santa Fe Institute; University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Jeremy A. Sabloff served as President of the Santa Fe Institute from 2009 to 2015 and continues as an external professor. He also is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and held the position of Williams Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1994 to 2004. Dr. Sabloff's research centers on archaeological theory and method and the history of American archaeology as well as the nature of ancient civilizations. More specifically, he studies pre-industrial urbanism and the use of settlement pattern studies to illuminate the development of urban organization. His field research has focused on the Maya lowlands and the study of the transition from Classic to Postclassic Maya civilization. Dr. Sabloff is the former president of the Society for American Archaeology and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1969 and has previously held positions at Harvard and the Universities of New Mexico, Utah and Pittsburgh. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1996. In 2016 he received the Kidder Award from the American Anthropological Association.
 
23Name:  Dr. Evon Zartman Vogt
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  May 13, 2004
   
24Name:  Dr. Anthony F. C. Wallace
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1969
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1923
 Death Date:  October 5, 2015
   
 
Anthony F.C. Wallace embarked on an anthropological career at a young age as a research assistant to his father, ethnologist and historian Paul A.W. Wallace in the 1930s. After briefly studying at Lebanon Valley College, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, which assigned him to the 14th Armored Division which, in 1945, participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp. After his discharge, Dr. Wallace began a lifelong association with the University of Pennsylvania's anthropology department, of which he eventually became chair. Bringing to the discipline a unique blend of ethnology and history influenced by the social, behavioral and biological sciences, he became one of the pioneers in the development of ethnohistory as a distinct field. Dr. Wallace made important contributions to our knowledge of Native American personality, kinship studies, the effects of stress, and religious cults and movements and developed new insights into the ways in which indigenous peoples react to the pressures of modern Western civilization. Among his many projects, he spent nearly 20 years researching a detailed study of Seneca Indian society, and he had written multiple books exploring native-white relations in America, particularly government policy towards Native Americans. Throughout his career, Dr. Wallace also conducted a number of studies of the psychological effects of disasters and of modern social behaviors, from watching television to inhabiting a high-rise building. His many publications include Culture and Personality (1961), Religion: An Anthropological View (1966), Death and Rebirth (1970) and Thomas Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans (1999). In combining social and psychological processes toward the understanding of personality, religion and modern and indigenous societies, Dr. Wallace was without peer. He became University Professor of Anthropology Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987, but he remained an active and influential scholar, frequently lecturing on the benefits and limitations of local history. Documents from his professional and personal life, including drafts, correspondence, research notes and photographs, comprise a large part of the Wallace Family Collection, which is housed in the American Philosophical Society Library. He had been elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1969. Anthony Wallace died October 5, 2015, at the age of 92.
 
25Name:  Dr. Patty Jo Watson
 Institution:  Washington University; University of Montana
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1932
   
 
Patty Jo Watson received a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1959. At Washington University since 1969, she is currently Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology. She is the recipient of the Fryxell Medal from the Society for American Archaeology, the Distinguished Service Award from the American Anthropological Association, and the Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement from the Archaeological Institute of America. Dr. Watson is the author of The Prehistory of Salts Cave, Kentucky (1969); Archaeological Ethnography in Western Iran (1979); (with others) Man and Nature (1969); Explanation in Archaeology (1971); Archaeological Explanation (1984); Girikihaciyan - A Halafian Site in Southeastern Turkey; and Archaeology of the Middle Green River Region, Kentucky (2005). She was the editor, and author in part, of Archaeology of the Mammoth Cave Area (1974); editor (with others) Prehistoric Archaeology Along the Zagros Flanks (1983); and co-editor of The Origins of Agriculture (1991) and Of Caves and Shell Mounds (1996). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the American Anthropological Association and the Society for American Archaeology (editor, American Antiquity, 1984-87), and she is an Honorary Life Member of the National Speleological Society. She has served on the governing board of the Archaeological Institute of America and the executive board of the Center for American Archeology, as well as on the editorial board of the Journal of Cave and Karst Sciences, and of Anthropology Today (Royal Anthropological Institute). In 2007 she received the Archaeological Institute of America's Pomerance Award for Scientific Contributions to Archaeology. Patty Jo Watson has made major contributions in archaeological theory, archaeological method, and archaeological practice in North America, Western Asia, and China. Explanation in Archaeology is a landmark in the EuroAmerican theory debates of the 1970s and is still current in discussions of archaeological theory. Her pioneering work in ethnoarchaeology in Iran, and later on flotation techniques for recovering plant remains are extremely influential contributions to archaeological practice in the Americas, Europe, and China. Her 35 years of research in Kentucky caves has provided crucial evidence about the pre-maize, indigenous agricultural complex developed in Eastern North America. The wide scope and the depth of these contributions make Patty Jo Watson one of the most preeminent archaeologists of her generation. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2000.
 
26Name:  Dr. Irene J. Winter
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Born in New York City, Irene Winter received her AB in Anthropology from Barnard College (1960), her MA in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures from the University of Chicago (1967), and her PhD from Columbia University in the History of Art and Archaeology (1973). She taught at Queens College, CUNY, from 1971-1976, at the University of Pennsylvania from 1976-1988, and is presently Boardman Professor of Fine Arts Emerita at Harvard University, having served on the faculty from 1988 to 2009, and as Department Chair from 1993-1996. In 1996-97 she was Slade Professor at Cambridge University, delivering the Slade Lectures in the Spring of 1997. She subsequently delivered the Flexner Lectures at Bryn Mawr College in 1999, and in the Spring of 2005 presented the Andrew H. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery in Washington, DC. Professor Winter has participated in archaeological excavations at Godin Tepe and Hasanlu, Iran, and at Tell Sakhariyeh, Iraq, with additional comparative fieldwork in India. Her awards include a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship (1983-88), along with an Olivia James travel Grant of the Archaeological Institute of America, and a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Fellowship. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1999, was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in 2003-04, was named a Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, in 2005, received the Medal of Distinction from Barnard College in 2009, and was designated an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2013. She has served on the Board of the College Art Association, several editorial and grants boards, and the Scientific Committee of the International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East since its inception in 1988. She has also been a member of the Iraq Task Force of the Archaeological Institute of America. Her principal work has been devoted to the art and archaeology of the Ancient Near East, writing on topics ranging from ivory carving and cylinder seals to royal sculpture. Throughout her career, her stress has been on the relationship between the visual arts, language, history and culture in an attempt to join empirical data with theory in an inter-disciplinary context. Two volumes of collected essays, published by Brill, appeared in 2010, entitled On Art in the Ancient Near East. The Mellon lectures will be published as Visual Affect: Aesthetic Experience and Ancient Mesopotamia.
 
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