American Philosophical Society
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1Name:  Dr. Svetlana Alpers
 Institution:  New York University; University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Svetlana Alpers is an art historian, critic, and artist. She was born in Cambridge, Mass., studied History and Literature at Radcliffe, turning from text to image for a PhD. In Fine Arts. She studied briefly with Richard Krautheimer at the IFA in New York, then formatively with the visiting E.H. Gombrich at Harvard and taught at the University of California, Berkeley from 1962-94. She published on Flemish art before turning to Dutch art with The Art of Describing, with books on Rembrandt, Rubens, Tiepolo (with Michael Baxandall) and on the Vexations of Art: Velazquez and Others. She was a founding editor of Representations. A group of photographic prints after Tiepolo from the series "Painting then for now" (with James Hyde and Barney Kulok) is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
 
2Name:  Dr. John C. Avise
 Institution:  University of California, Irvine; University of Georgia
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  207. Genetics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
John C. Avise I am a naturalist at heart, a geneticist by training, and my career has been devoted to wedding these two arenas. After obtaining a B.S. degree in Fish Biology at the University of Michigan, I went on to earn a M.A. in Zoology from the University of Texas and a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of California at Davis. My graduate training came at a time when molecular approaches were being introduced to population genetics, and I began to see that molecular markers could open the entire biological world for genetic scrutiny. Ever since then my students and I have used molecular markers to analyze the natural histories and evolution of wild animals. Topics that we have studied range from micro-evolutionary to macro-evolutionary: genetic parentage and mating systems, geographic population structure, gene flow, hybridization, biogeography, speciation, systematics, and phylogenetics. We have conducted research on diverse vertebrate and invertebrate animals from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments. Our typical goal is to unveil behavioral or evolutionary features of organisms, but we also aim to elucidate genetic and evolutionary properties of protein and DNA molecules. The theory and practice of evolutionary genetics are relevant to ecological issues and conservation biology, two areas that provide themes for much of our research. Although I am the acknowledged 'father of phylogeography', I like to think of myself as a broader pioneer in molecular ecology, molecular evolution, and conservation genetics. In addition to hundreds of scientific articles, I have published 20 books on subjects ranging from the science-religion interface to genetic engineering, natural history, molecular ecology, evolution, biogeography, phylogenetics, reproductive modes, educational outreach, and roles for humor in science.
 
3Name:  Dr. John Baines
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
John Baines is the foremost actively engaged authority on Ancient Egypt of our time. He received his D.Phil. from the University of Oxford in 1976. His versatile scholarship is unique in its scope, covering all aspects of Egyptology, from archaeology to epigraphy and writing, from prehistory to the latest phases of the civilization. He has conducted archeological excavations, written on conceptions of color, on the origins of writing, on history, concepts of ethnicity, on historiography, literature, as well as on notions of kingship, to mention only some of his interests. His work is characterized by a vigorous engagement with other disciplines, including art history, anthropology, sociology, or the comparative study of writing systems; he has perfected an interdisciplinary approach to the study of an ancient civilization that has created a new model for the analysis of ancient societies and brought his field into dialogues with other fields of knowledge. His work is often comparative in scope, but is always grounded in deep study and analysis of the ancient sources. At the same time he has been active in communicating knowledge outside of the academy; his Atlas of Ancient Egypt, translated into at least ten languages, has provided knowledge about this ancient civilization to students and lay persons throughout the globe. Additionally, he has published: Fecundity Figures: Egyptian Personification and the Iconology of a Genre, 1985; Die Bedeutung des Reisens im alten Ägypten, 2002; Visual and Written Culture in Ancient Egypt, 2007; and High Culture and Experience in Ancient Egypt, 2011. He is a member of the Royal Anthropological Institute and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
4Name:  Dr. R. Stephen Berry
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1931
 Death Date:  July 26, 2020
   
 
R. Stephen Berry was the James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Chicago. He had been at The University of Chicago since 1964; previously he was an Assistant Professor at Yale, and earlier, an Instructor at the University of Michigan. He is a Denver native, and in East High School, a Finalist in what was then the Westinghouse Science Talent Search. In September, 2011, he was inducted into the East High Alumni Heritage Hall. He went to Harvard, where he earned his A.B. and Ph.D., and met Carla Friedman, whom he married in 1955. In his career, he has worked on a variety of subjects ranging from strictly scientific matters to a variety of topics in policy. He has held visiting professorships at other universities, including the University of Copenhagen (1967 and 1979), the Université de Paris-Sud (1979-80), the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (1984), and Oxford University (1973-74, 1980 and in 1986-87, as the Newton-Abraham Professor). He spent 1994 at the Freie Universität Berlin as an awardee of the Humboldt Prize. He has close associations with the Aspen Center for Physics (Board of Directors, 1978-84) and was a co-founder of the Telluride Summer Research Center (now Telluride Science Research Center) (Board of Directors, 1984-present; President, 1989-93). In 1983 he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and was its Home Secretary from 1999 until 2003. He was also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Vice-President, 1987-90) and is a Foreign Member of the Royal Danish Academy. In 1997, he received the Heyrovsky Medal of the Czech Academy of Sciences. In 2010, he received a Diploma Science Honoris Causa from the Romanian Medical Society. His scientific research has been both theoretical and experimental, in areas of atomic and molecular clusters and chaos, topographies and dynamics of complex potential surfaces, atomic collisions and photoionization, protein dynamics and interactions, and, for many years, finite-time thermodynamics, a new approach to extend thermodynamics toward energy efficiency. His experimental work included studies of negative ions, detection and reactions of transient molecular species, photoionization and other laser-matter interactions. Some of his work outside traditional science has involved interweaving thermodynamics with economics and resource policy, including efficient use of energy. He has sometimes worked since the mid-1970s with issues of science and the law, and with management of scientific data. He has also worked in matters of scientific ethics and of some aspects of national security. His current scientific interests include the dynamics of atomic and molecular clusters, the basis of "guided" protein folding and other "structure-seeking" processes, and the thermodynamics of time-constrained processes and the efficient use of energy. He has been author or coauthor of five books, including one on thermodynamic optimization and one on the total social costs of coal and nuclear power. He was author or coauthor of over 530 published papers.
 
5Name:  Dr. Jed Z. Buchwald
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404c
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Jed Z. Buchwald is Doris and Henry Dreyfuss Professor of History at the Californnia Institute of Technology. He is married to Diana Kormos Buchwald, who is also a professor at Caltech, where she is Director and General Editor of the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Awarded a five-year MacArthur Fellowship in 1995, Buchwald was trained at Princeton (BA ’71) and Harvard (Ph.D ’74.) From 1974 to 1992 he taught at the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and. From 1992 to 2001 he was at MIT as Dibner Professor of the History of Science, where he also directed the Dibner Institute. Buchwald has authored or co-authored five books and seven edited volumes on the history of science and related matters. His most recent two are The Zodiac of Paris, with Diane Greco Josefowicz and (recently completed) Reckoning with the Past: Isaac Newton, Ancient Chronicles and the Temper of Evidence, with Mordechai Feingold. His editorial activities include: co-editor with Jeremy Gray, Archive for History of Exact Sciences; editor, Archimedes New Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (Kluwer-Springer); managing editor, Studies and Sources in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (Springer); editor, Transformations Studies in the History of Science and Technology (MIT); he serves on the advisory board of several other journals. At Caltech Buchwald teaches courses in ancient civilization, religion and in the history of physics.
 
6Name:  Mr. Ken Burns
 Institution:  Florentine Films
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Ken Burns is considered by many to be one of the most distinguished and influential documentary filmmakers in the United States. His various documentaries - including: Brooklyn Bridge, 1981; The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God, 1984; The Statue of Liberty, 1985; Huey Long, 1985; The Congress, 1988; Thomas Hart Benton, 1988; The Civil War, 1990; Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio, 1991; William Segal, 1992; Baseball, 1994; Vezelay, 1996; Thomas Jefferson, 1997; Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery, 1997; Frank Lloyd Wright, 1998; Not For Ourselves Alone: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, 1999; In the Marketplace, 2000; Jazz, 2001; Mark Twain, 2001; Horatio’s Drive: America’s First Road Trip, 2003; Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, 2005; The War, 2007; The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, 2009 - explore the history of America in a unique and inspiring way through the use of innovative and captivating cinematography, memorable underlying musical motifs, and a distinctive storytelling voice. Often playing multiple roles as filmmaker, Burns was the director, producer, co-writer, chief cinematographer, music director and executive producer of both Baseball and The Civil War. In cinematography, Burns’ technique of panning across a photograph to focus on the subject of narration is now referred to as the Ken Burns Effect. He has won numerous awards - The Civil War alone bringing in over 40 - including seven Emmy awards, and has been nominated twice for the Academy Award for Best Documentary. He is the recipient of the 2019 Lenfest Spirit of the American Revolution Award. His work continues with Baseball: The Tenth Inning (2010), Prohibition (2011), The Dust Bowl (2012) The Central Park Five (2012), and The Roosevelts (2014). He and his works are symbols of excellence and humanity. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
7Name:  Dr. Natalie Zemon Davis
 Institution:  University of Toronto; Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1928
   
 
Natalie Zemon Davis is a social and cultural historian of early modern times. She has written on peasants and artisans in early modern France; on women in Germany, France, the Netherlands and Québec; on criminality and storytelling in sixteenth-century France; on forms of gift-giving in early modern times; and on Muslims and Christians in sixteenth-century Europe. She is the author of eight books, all of them translated into various foreign languages: Society and Culture in Early Modern France; The Return of Martin Guerre (she was also historical consultant for the film Le Retour de Martin Guerre); Fiction in the Archives: Pardon Tales in Sixteenth-Century France; Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives; The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France; Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision; A Passion for History. Conversations with Denis Crouzet; Trickster Travels. A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds. Together with Arlette Farge, she was coeditor of volume 3 (Renasisssance and Enlightenment Paradoxes) of A History of Women, edited by Michelle Perrot and Georges Duby. She has taught at the University of Toronto, the University of California at Berkeley, and Princeton University, where she was Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and Director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies. A former president of the American Historical Association and vice-president of the International Commission of Historical Sciences, she is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a corresponding fellow of the British Academy, and Chevalier de l’Ordre des Palmes Académique. She is the recipient of various prizes (including the 2010 Ludwig Holberg International Prize and the 2012 National Humanities Medal) and honorary degrees, including from Harvard University, the University of Toronto, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Cambridge University, Université de Lyon, Université de Toulouse, and Oxford University. Emerita from Princeton University, Natalie Zemon Davis is currently Adjunct Professor of History and Anthropology, Professor of Medieval Studies, and Senior Fellow in Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Her present research is on slavery and forms of sociability in 18th-century Suriname, including the study of a slave family over four generations and of a Jewish settler family over six generations. She was awarded the 2014 Gold Medal in History from the Amercian Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
8Name:  Dr. Paula S. Fass
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley; Rutgers University, New Brunswick
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Paula S. Fass is the Professor of the Graduate School and Margaret Byrne Professor of History Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, where she has taught for the past four decades. She has also been the Distinguished Visitor in Residence at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Trained as a social and cultural historian of the United States at Columbia University, she has over the last decade been active in developing the field of children's history and worked to make this an interdisciplinary field with a global perspective. She was the president of the Society of the History of Children and Youth, which she helped to found, from 2007-2009. Her books include Children of a New World: Society, Culture, and Globalization (2007); Kidnapped: Child Abduction in America (1997); Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education (1989); The Damned and the Beautiful: American Youth in the 1920s (1977). With Mary Ann Mason, she edited Childhood in America (2000), the first anthology in children's history, a project she carried forward as Editor-in-Chief of the award-winning Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society (2004). She is currently editing the Routledge History of Childhood in the Western World. Inheriting the Holocaust: A Second Generation Memoir (2009) her most recent book, is a family memoir that recounts and examines her experiences as the daughter of concentration camp victims eager to understand the history of her new country and culture. Paula Fass has contributed to many collections in areas such as education, immigration, globalization, children's history and children's policy. She has toured Italy as a Department of State lecturer, and has also lectured in Sweden (as the Kerstin Hesselgren Professor of the Swedish Research Council), Poland, Chile, France, Turkey, and Israel. Paula Fass often appears on radio and television as a commentator on childhood in history and contemporary culture and has been widely interviewed on celebrity trials and the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr. She is working on a history of American parent-child relations over the course of two hundred years, from the founding of the republic through the global era.
 
9Name:  Dr. Marcus William Feldman
 Institution:  Stanford University; Xi'an Jiaotong University, China
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  203. Evolution & Ecology, Systematics, Population Genetics, Paleontology, and Physical Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Marcus Feldman is Director of the Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies and Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor of Biology at Stanford University, and Director of the Center for Complexity Studies, Xi'an Jiaotong University, China. Marcus Feldman’s contributions to evolutionary theory include over four-hundred fifty refereed publications and nine books, mentoring over fifty doctoral and postdoctoral students, including fifteen women from fourteen countries, who remain in academia today and who constitute a truly dominant worldwide force in evolutionary studies, and his application of evolutionary analysis to important social problems. Early in his career, Feldman became a leader in the study of natural selection acting on many genes simultaneously, i.e., multilocus selection. He used this as a basis for his famous studies on the evolution of genes that control important influences on the evolution of other genes, namely the evolution of mutation, recombination, and migration. His analytical framework remains the gold standard for quantitative studies of modifier genes, for example in the evolution of sex. With Cavalli-Sforza, Feldman originated the quantitative study of cultural evolution and gene-culture co-adaptation. Largely due to Feldman’s rigorous approach to this theory, it is now a major component of anthropological theory and behavioral economics. The mathematical and statistical approach that Feldman originated has been incorporated into such diverse fields as the evolution of lactose tolerance, the advantage of learning in changing environments, and heritability of intelligence. With colleagues in China, Feldman applied his theory of cultural coevolution to a major problem in Chinese demography, the excess of male births and the cultural preference for sons. His projections for future sex ratios, made using his models of cultural transmission and evolution, have led to major administrative programs aimed at alleviating the shortage of females. In the field of human genomics since 2001, Feldman has spearheaded the work on DNA polymorphisms, showing the central importance of ancient human migrations to the present pattern of human genomic variation. He has used this work to further his career-long fight against the use of genetics to justify racism. Over the past fifteen years, working with colleague Odling-Smee and former postdoctoral fellow Kevin Laland, Feldman has developed the quantitative theory of niche construction. This theory extends standard evolutionary theory by allowing the inheritance of organisms’ environments, introducing a complex pattern of feedbacks between genetic and environmental evolution. These feedbacks produce evolutionary dynamics not seen in standard evolutionary theory but which can describe how environmental effects of human culture can affect human genetic evolution. In 2011 Feldman was honored as the Dan David laureat for his work in evolution. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
10Name:  Dr. Graham R. Fleming
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Graham Fleming was appointed UC Berkeley’s Vice Chancellor for Research in April 2009, having previously served as the Deputy Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Through joint appointments as Melvin Calvin Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley, and Founding Director of both the Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division and UC Berkeley’s California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), he has re-shaped the intersection of physical and biological sciences, while maintaining his own investigations into ultrafast chemical and biological processes, in particular, the primary steps of photosynthesis. Throughout his administrative career, Fleming has remained a highly active scientific researcher. He has authored or co-authored more than 440 publications and 1 book; and is widely considered to be one of the world's foremost authorities on ultrafast processes. Born in Barrow, England, in 1949, Fleming earned his Bachelor's of Science degree from the University of Bristol in 1971, and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of London Royal Institute in 1974. Following a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Melbourne, Australia, he joined the faculty of the University of Chicago in 1979. There, he rose through the academic ranks to become the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor, a post he held for ten years, starting in 1987. At University of Chicago, he also served for three years as the Chair of the Chemistry Department. In that role, he led the creation of University of Chicago’s first new research institute in more than 50 years, the Institute for Biophysical Dynamics. In addition to his many other activities, Fleming has given numerous talks around the world on the inter-relation and inter-complexity of energy, climate and photosynthesis. In 2007, Fleming led the effort (with co-chair Mark Ratner) to define Grand Challenges in Basic Energy Science for DOE/BES, resulting in Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination. At present, Graham Fleming is engaged in coordinating energy and climate research at Berkeley, as well as continuing his research in photosynthesis and condensed phase dynamics.
 
11Name:  Mr. Richard J. Franke
 Institution:  The John Nuveen Company; Chicago Humanities Festival
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1931
 Death Date:  April 15, 2022
   
 
Richard Franke, who served for a distinguished twenty-two years as Chief Executive Officer of the John Nuveen Company, has been called the business community’s most visible and effective public advocate for humanities and for the value of a liberal arts education. He has been a trustee of Yale University, the University of Chicago, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, the Chicago Orchestral Association, the Newberry Library, and the Illinois Humanities Council. As chairman of the latter, he spearheaded the founding of the Chicago Humanities Festival, a city-wide event that brings together the major cultural institutions of the city and guest visitors from around the world in a wide-ranging celebration of the arts and humanities through lectures, exhibitions, and symposia. In addition, the Frankes have been generous philanthropists, contributing to many cultural institutions. Among these, they have endowed the Franke Humanities Institute and a humanities professorship at the University of Chicago and have donated fellowships, lectureships, and significant support to the library and to the Whitney Humanities Institute at Yale University. In recognition of his role, Mr. Franke was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Clinton in 1997. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s National Award for Distinguished Service to the Humanities in 2000 and the Phyllis Franklin Award for Public Advocacy of the Humanities from the Modern Language Association in 2007. He earned an M.B.A. from Harvard University. He is the author of Cut from Whole Cloth (2005), and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
12Name:  Dr. Paul Freedman
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404b
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Paul Freedman is Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale and was chair of the Department from 2004 to 2007. In 2010-2011 he was acting chair. His field is medieval Europe and he has written on Spain, the church, peasants and most recently on food and luxury products in the Middle Ages. Freedman has taught in the freshman Directed Studies (Great Books) program at Yale and offered courses in the Humanities Department. His History Department courses include lectures on the Middle Ages, a course on the history of food and cuisine, and seminars and a number of topics from the Crusades to the European ideas about Asia and Africa. Graduating from the Santa Cruz campus of the University of California, Freedman received his Ph.D. from Berkeley in 1978. He taught at Vanderbilt University from 1979 until 1997 when he came to Yale. He has received research fellowships from the Cullman Center of the New York Public Library, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as from government cultural agencies in Spain, France and Germany. Freedman is the author of several books on medieval Spain, including The Diocese of Vic (1983) and The Origins of Peasant Servitude in Medieval Catalonia (1992). In 1999 he published Images of the Medieval Peasant which deals with Europe generally and how the vast majority of medieval society were depicted in literature, art and sermons. Yale University Press in 2008 published Freedman’s book Out of the East: Spices and the Medieval Imagination which considers why spices were so popular in the Middle Ages as to become major items of trade and the stimulus to exploration of Asia and the New World. In 2007 Freedman edited Food: The History of Taste, a book about cuisine from prehistoric hunter-gathers until the present-day trends. His recent books include American Cuisine and How It Got That Way (2019).
 
13Name:  Dr. Carol Greenhouse
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  407. Philosophy
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Carol J. Greenhouse is a cultural anthropologist specializing in the anthropology of law and politics, with primary interests in the United States. A graduate of Harvard University (A.B. Anthropology, Ph.D. Social Anthropology), she taught at Cornell and Indiana-Bloomington prior to joining the anthropology faculty at Princeton, where she has remained, entering emeritus status in 2019. She has held the chair (visiting) in American Civilization at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and is past president of the Law & Society Association and the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology; she is also former editor of American Ethnologist. Her books include Praying for Justice: Faith, Hope and Community in an America Town, A Moment's Notice: Time Politics Across Cultures, Law and Community in Three American Towns (with David Engel and Barbara Yngvesson; winner of the Law & Society Association book prize), The Relevance of Paradox: Ethnography and Citizenship in the United States and edited volumes Ethnography and Democracy: Constructing Identity in Multicultural Liberal States, Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Social Change (co-edited with Elizabeth Mertz and Kay Warren) and Ethnographies of Neoliberalism. In 2011, she was co-winner of the Law & Society Association's Kalven Prize. She is married to Alfred C. Aman, Jr., Roscoe C. O'Byrne Professor of Law and former dean at Indiana University's Maurer School of Law, Bloomington.
 
14Name:  Dr. Susan D. Gubar
 Institution:  Indiana University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
A literary and cultural critic, Susan Gubar is Ruth Halls Professor and Distinguished Professor Emerita at Indiana University. With co-author Sandra M. Gilbert, she published The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the 19th-Century Literary Imagination in 1979 (Yale University Press), a finalist for both The Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. The project was the beginning of many collaborative projects between the two, who together won a 1985 Ms. Woman of the Year award for their compilation of the Norton Anthology of Literature of Women. They also co-authored a critical trilogy titled No Man's Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century--The War of the Words (1988), Sexchanges (1989), and Letters from the Front (1994); a collection of poetry for and about mothers, MotherSongs (Norton, 1995); and a satire on the current state of literacy and cultural literacy, Masterpiece Theatre: An Academic Melodrama (Rutgers, 1995). Gubar’s subsequent books include Racechanges: White Skin, Black Face in American Culture (Oxford, 1997); a compilation of essays, Critical Condition: Feminism at the Turn of the Century (Columbia, 2000); and Poetry After Auschwitz: Remembering What One Never Knew (Indiana, 2003), the product of her year as a Laurence S. Rockefeller Fellow at Princeton University's Center for Human Values. In 2005, she published the first annotated edition of Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own in the States (Harcourt Brace). In 2006, her book Rooms of Our Own (Illinois) won an Honorable Mention award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, and in 2007, with Gilbert, she published a third edition of the Norton Anthology of Literature by Women as well as a Norton Reader of Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism. Her cultural biography of Judas (Norton, 2009), the twelfth apostle, was listed in Magill’s Literary Annual as one of the best books of 2009. She recently wrote Memoir of a Debulked Woman: Ending Ovarian Cancer in 2012. The recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation, Gubar was the 2003 recipient of The Faculty Mentor Award from IU's Graduate Professional Student Organization and received the 2010 President's Medal for Excellence, among the highest honors an IU president can bestow. Currently, she has completed the editing of True Confessions: Feminist Professors Tell Stories Out of School (forthcoming from Norton), a collection of autobiographical essays by the first generation of women to integrate the study of gender into such disciplines as philosophy, art history, comparative literature, religion, psychology, anthropology, and African American studies.
 
15Name:  Mr. Ben W. Heineman
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Ben W. Heineman, Jr. was GE’s Senior Vice President-General Counsel for GE from 1987-2003, and then Senior Vice President for Law and Public Affairs from 2004 until his retirement at the end of 2005. He is currently Distinguished Senior Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Program on the Legal Profession, Senior Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Program on Corporate Governance, Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. A Rhodes Scholar, editor-in-chief of the Yale Law Journal and law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart, Mr. Heineman was assistant secretary for policy at the Department of Health, Education and Welfare and practiced constitutional law prior to his service at GE. His book, High Performance with High Integrity, was published in June, 2008 by the Harvard Business Press. He writes and lectures frequently on business, law and international affairs. He is also the author of books on British race relations and the American presidency. He is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the National Academy of Science’s Committee on Science, Technology and Law and recipient of the American Lawyer’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award of Board Member Magazine. He was named one of America’s 100 most influential lawyers by the National Law Journal , was named one of the 100 most influential individuals on business ethics by Ethisphere Magazine and was named on of the 100 most influential people in corporate governance by the National Association of Corporate Directors. He serves on the boards of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center(chair of patient care committee), the Center for Strategic and International Studies (chair of program committee), Transparency International-USA (chair of program committee) and the Committee For Economic Development (chair of the corporate governance committee). He is a member of the board of trustees of Central European University. He is currently on an international panel advising the President of the World Bank on governance and anti-corruption.
 
16Name:  Dr. Sarah Blaffer Hrdy
 Institution:  University of California, Davis
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  205. Microbiology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Sarah Blaffer Hrdy graduated summa cum laude from Radcliffe College and earned her PhD at Harvard in 1975. Currently she is professor emerita in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Davis. She has been elected to the California Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the sole author of five books including The Woman That Never Evolved (1981), Mother Nature (1999), and Mothers and Others: The evolutionary origins of mutual understanding (2009) as well as co-editor of Infanticide: Comparative and Evolutionary Perspectives and Attachment and Bonding: A New Synthesis. Her current focus is on how evolutionary perspectives can help us better understand the needs of children. She and her husband, a medical doctor, have three children and currently combine growing walnuts with habitat restoration on their farm in northern California (which can be found at www.citrona.com). In 2014 she was received the NAS Award for Scientific Publishing.
 
17Name:  Dr. J. Steve Jones
 Institution:  University College London
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  203. Evolution & Ecology, Systematics, Population Genetics, Paleontology, and Physical Anthropology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Steve Jones is a geneticist whose research, primarily concerned with snails and the light their anatomy can shed on biodiversity and genetics, has led to the publication of over 100 specialist papers. He also does more than his share of university teaching and administration, but his main contribution is in the popularization of science. Jones is one of the best known contemporary writers on evolution, and in 1996 he won the Royal Society’s Michael Faraday Prize “for his numerous, wide ranging contributions to the public understanding of science in areas such as human evolution and variation, race, sex, inherited disease and genetic manipulation through his many broadcasts on radio and television, his lectures, popular science books, and his regular science column in The Daily Telegraph and contributions to other newspaper media.” Jones combines profundity with wit, as the APS members who attended his two lectures in the UK in June/July 2009 can attest. His publications include: The Language of the Genes, 1993; (S. Jones, et al) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution, 1994; In the Blood: God, Genes and Destiny, 1997; Almost Like a Whale: The Origin of Species Updated, 1999; Darwin’s Ghost: The Origin of Species Updated, 2000; Y: The Descent of Men, 2003; (with B. Van Loon) Introducing Genetics, 2005; Coral, 2007; and Darwin’s Island, 2009. In addition to the Faraday Prize, he has been awarded the Institute of Biology Charter Medal (2002) and the Thomson Reuters Award of the Zoological Society of London (2009). He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh in 1971. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
18Name:  Dr. Richard L. Kagan
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Richard L. Kagan is Arthur O. Lovejoy Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University where he has been a member of the faculty since 1972. A graduate of Columbia University (BA, 1965) and Cambridge University (Ph.D., 1968), Professor Kagan has also taught at Indiana University, the Autonomous University of Madrid, the University of Barcelona, the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and Ecole de Hautes Etudes et Sciences Sociales in Paris. His grants include awards from the American Philosophical Society, the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Association, the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Getty Grant Committee, etc. He has been a visiting fellow at the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies (Princeton University), Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Washington, DC. Specializing in the history of early modern Europe, especially that of Spain and its overseas empire, his major publications include Students and Society in Early Modern Spain (Johns Hopkins, 1974); Lawsuits and Litigants in Castile, 1500-1700 (North Carolina, 1981); Lucrecia's Dreams: Politics and Prophecy in Sixteenth-Century Spain (California, 1990); and Urban Images of the Hispanic World, 1493-1793 (Yale, 2000). He is also the editor of Spanish Cities of the Golden Age: The Views of Anton van den Wyngaerde (California, 1989); (with Geoffrey Parker) Spain, Europe and the Atlantic World (Cambridge, 1995); Spain and America: The Origins of Hispanism in the United States (Illinois, 2002); (with Abby Dyer) Inquisitorial Inquiries: The Brief Lives of Secret Jews and other Heretics (2004); (with Philip Morgan) Atlantic Diasporas: Jews, Conversos, and Crypto-Jews in the Age of Mercantilism (2008); and Clio and the Crown: The Politics of History in Medieval and Early Modern Spain (2009). Other publications include articles in the American Historical Review, Art Bulletin, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Past and Present, Rivista Historica Italiana, Società e Storia, Studies in the History of Art, Studia Historica, etc. He has also contributed essays to several exhibition catalogues, notably El Greco of Toledo (National Gallery of Art, 1982) Circa 1492 (National Gallery of Art, 1992), Spain in the Age of Exploration, 1492-1819 (Seattle Art Museum, 2004), and Nueva York, an exhibition sponsored by the New York Historical Society and the Museo del Barrio (2010). Professor Kagan's current research focuses on artistic and cultural relations between the United States and the wider Hispanic world. His recent publications in this area include "The Spanish Craze in the United States: Cultural Entitlement and the Appropriation of Spain's Cultural Patrimony, ca. 1890 - ca. 1930," Revista Complutense de Historia de American 36 (2010), 37-58, and "Blame it on Washington Irving: New York's Discovery of the Art and Architecture of Spain," Nueva York: 1613-1945, ed. Edward Sullivan, (New York, New York Historical Society, and Scala, 2010), 155-171.
 
19Name:  The Honorable Elena Kagan
 Institution:  United States Supreme Court
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1960
   
 
Elena Kagan, Associate Justice, was born in New York, New York, on April 28, 1960. She received an A.B., summa cum laude, in 1981 from Princeton University. She attended Worcester College, Oxford University, as Princeton’s Daniel M. Sachs Graduating Fellow, and received an M. Phil. in 1983. In 1986, she earned a J.D. from Harvard Law School, graduating magna cum laude, where she was supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review. She served as a law clerk to Judge Abner Mikva of the U.S Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit from 1986-1987. She served as a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall of the Supreme Court of the United States during the 1987 Term. She worked as an associate in the Washington, D.C. law firm of Williams & Connolly, LLP, from 1989-1991. She became an assistant professor at the University of Chicago Law School in 1991 and a tenured professor of law in 1995. From 1995-1999, she was associate counsel to President Clinton and then served as deputy assistant to the President for Domestic Policy and Deputy Director of the Domestic Policy Council. She joined Harvard Law School as a visiting professor in 1999 and became professor of law in 2001. She was the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor of Law and was appointed the 11th dean of Harvard Law School in 2003. President Obama nominated her to serve as the 45th Solicitor General of the United States and she was confirmed on March 19, 2009. President Obama nominated her as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court on May 10, 2010, and she assumed this role on August 7, 2010.
 
20Name:  Mr. Nicholas D. Kristof
 Institution:  The New York Times
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Nicholas D. Kristof, a columnist for The New York Times since November 2001, is a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner who writes op-ed columns that appear twice a week. He was awarded the inaugural Aurora Humanitarian Journalism Award for his reporting on human rights abuses and social injustices in 2020. He attempted a run for Governor of Oregon in 2022. Mr. Kristof grew up on a sheep and cherry farm near Yamhill, Oregon. He graduated from Harvard College, Phi Beta Kappa, and then won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, where he studied law and graduated with first class honors. He later studied Arabic in Cairo and Chinese in Taipei. After working in France, he caught the travel bug and began backpacking around Africa and Asia, writing articles to cover his expenses. Mr. Kristof has lived on four continents, reported on six, and traveled to more than 150 countries, plus all 50 states, every Chinese province and every main Japanese island. He’s also one of the very few Americans to be at least a two-time visitor to every member of the "Axis of Evil." During his travels, he has had unpleasant experiences with malaria, mobs and an African airplane crash. After joining The New York Times in 1984, initially covering economics, he served as a correspondent in Los Angeles and as bureau chief in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Tokyo. In 2000, he covered the presidential campaign, and he is the author of the chapter on George W. Bush in the reference book The Presidents. He later was Associate Managing Editor of the Times, responsible for Sunday editions. In 1990 Mr. Kristof and his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, until recently also a Times journalist, won a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of China’s Tiananmen Square movement. They were the first married couple to win a Pulitzer for journalism. Mr. Kristof won a second Pulitzer in 2006, for what the judges called "his graphic, deeply reported columns that, at personal risk, focused attention on genocide in Darfur." Mr. Kristof has also won other prizes including the George Polk award, the Overseas Press Club award, the Michael Kelly award, the Online News Association award, and the American Society of Newspaper Editors award. Mr. Kristof has taken a special interest in Web journalism and was the first blogger on The New York Times Web site; he has a Facebook fan page and a channel on Youtube, as well as nearly 1 million followers on Twitter. In his column, Mr. Kristof was an early opponent of the Iraq war, was among the first to warn that we were losing ground in Afghanistan, and has regularly focused attention on global poverty, health and gender issues, as well as climate change. Since 2004, he has written dozens of columns about Darfur and has visited the region around Darfur eleven times. Mr. Kristof and Ms. WuDunn are authors of three best-selling books: China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power in 1994; Thunder from the East: Portrait of a Rising Asia in 2000; and Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide in 2009. Their most recent book, A Path Appears, was published in 2014. Mr. Kristof is also the subject of an HBO documentary executive-produced by Ben Affleck, "Reporter," and serves on the boards of Harvard University and the American Association of Rhodes Scholars. He has received a number of honorary doctorates and other honors. Mr. Kristof and Ms. WuDunn are the parents of three children. Mr. Kristof enjoys running, backpacking, and having his Chinese and Japanese corrected by his children.
 
Election Year
2011[X]
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