American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
21Name:  Dr. Carlos H. Baker
 Year Elected:  1982
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1909
 Death Date:  4/18/87
   
22Name:  Dr. Kurt Baldinger
 Institution:  University of Heidelberg
 Year Elected:  1976
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  unknown
   
 
Born in Switzerland in 1919, Kurt Baldinger is an educator and linguist who, as a professor of Romance philology, has been associated with the University of Heidelberg (Ruprecht-Karl Universität) since 1957. He was a professor in Berlin from 1948-56 and served as director of the Institut für romanische Sprachwissenschaft of the Berlin Academy of Sciences from 1949-56. He is a member of the Akademie der Wissenschaften, Heidelberg, the Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften and the Société de Linguistique romane, among others. The author of a number of books, from Kollektivsuffixe und Kollektivebegriff (1950) to Teoria semántica: hacia una semántica moderna (1970), Dr. Baldinger also founded and edited the Dictionnaire étymologique de l'ancien français and served as editor-in-chief of the Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch.
 
23Name:  Dr. John W. Baldwin
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  February 8, 2015
   
 
John Baldwin was a leading American specialist on the history of medieval France. Like Charles Homer Haskins, he had worked on the institutional and intellectual history of the twelfth century. His early works on the "just price" and the schoolman Peter the Chanter opened new vistas of research on economic growth and the culture of power. His book on the government of Philip Augustus won major prizes in America and France. The recipient of major honors in France and the United States, Dr. Baldwin was a generous colleague, a venerated teacher, and a distinguished medievalist in the mode of C. H. Haskins and J. R. Strayer. He had been at Johns Hopkins University since 1986 as Charles Homer Haskins Professor of History and Professor of History Emeritus. He was awarded the Medieval Academy's Haskins Medal in 1990 and the Chevalier de l'Ordre National de la Légion d'Honneur, France in 2001. He was a member of the Medieval Academy of America (president, 1996-97); the British Academy; and l'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2004.
 
24Name:  Dr. Leonard Barkan
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Leonard Barkan is the Arthur W. Marks '19 Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton and Director of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts. He has been a professor of English and of Art History at universities including Northwestern, Michigan, and N.Y.U. Among his books are The Gods Made Flesh: Metamorphosis and the Pursuit of Paganism and Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture, which won prizes from the Modern Language Association, the College Art Association, the American Comparative Literature Association, Phi Beta Kappa, and the PEN America Center. He has been an actor and a director; he is also a regular contributor to publications in both the U.S. and Italy, where he writes on the subject of food and wine. He has recently completed Satyr Square, which is an account of art, literature, food, wine, Italy, and himself; it will be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in 2006. His current project is a scholarly study of the relations among words, images, and pleasure from Plato to the Renaissance. He recently won the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
25Name:  Dr. Teodolinda Barolini
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Teodolinda Barolini is one of the leading Dante scholars of our time, perhaps best known for her book The Undivine 'Comedy': Detheologizing Dante, which moves beyond Dante's own determination of the reader's experience to search for the poet's real narrative techniques. She was awarded the Howard R. Marraro Prize of the Modern Language Assosication and the John Nicholas Brown Prize of the Medieval Academy of America for her book Dante's Poets: Textuality and Truth in the 'Comedy'. She also has a wide range of interests in Medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, particularly poetry, and she is currently preparing a commentary to Dante's lyrics for the Biblioteca Universale Rizzoli. Teodolinda Barolini received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1978 and served as assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley until 1983 when she moved to New York University. In 1992, she joined the faculty of Columbia University, where she is currently the Lorenzo Da Ponte Professor of Italian. From 1992-2004 she led Columbia's Italian Department as chair and director of graduate studies, while at the same time serving as president of the Dante Society of America from 1997-2003. In 1996 she received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia. Dr. Barolini is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
26Name:  Dr. James Barr
 Institution:  Vanderbilt University
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  October 14, 2006
   
27Name:  George A. Barton
 Year Elected:  1911
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1859
 Death Date:  6/28/42
   
28Name:  Dr. Wm. Theodore de Bary
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  July 14, 2017
   
 
Wm. Theodore de Bary began his career as a teacher at Columbia in 1949 when he undertook to develop the undergraduate general education program in Asian Studies. For this he developed basic source readings in Asian Civilizations for India, China, Japan and now Korea. These volumes dealing with the major traditions of Asia, published in 1958-60, have seen wide use in colleges and universities throughout the United States and abroad. They have now been supplemented by over 140 other texts and translations for use in general educations on Asia. As chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures from 1960-66 and as first director of the National Defense Languages and Area Center he led a major expansion of the language programs in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. From 1969-70 he was President of the Association for Asian Studies. From 1969-71 he served as the first chair of the Executive Committee of the University Senate. From 1971-78 as Provost of the University, among other duties, Dr. de Bary assisted in the renovation and expansion of the East Asian Library and established the Heyman Center for the Humanities, which includes among other programs, offices and a reading room for the Human Rights Program. In 1974, Dr. de Bary was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and in 1999 to the American Philosophical Society. He had received honorary degrees from St. Lawrence University, Loyola University in Chicago, and Columbia. Professor de Bary's scholarly work focused on the major religious and intellectual traditions of East Asia, especially Confucianism in China, Japan and Korea. Among the more than twenty-five works authored by him, he has dealt principally with the issues of civil society and human rights in China. They include Asian Values and Human Rights (1998) and Nobility and Civility: Asian Ideals of Leadership and the Common Good (2004). In 2014 he was awarded the National Humanities Medal. Wm. Theodore de Bary died July 14, 2017, at age 97, in Tappan, New York.
 
29Name:  Dr. Jacques Barzun
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  1984
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1907
 Death Date:  October 25, 2012
   
 
Jacques Barzun was born in France in 1907. He grew up in Paris and, at twelve years old, was sent by his father to the United States to receive an American university education. In 1923 he entered Columbia College and graduated four years later at the top of his class, having been a prize-winning president of the prestigious Philolexian Society. He went on to lecture at Columbia, where he earned his Ph.D in 1932, became a full professor in 1945, and later became Dean of the Graduate School, Dean of Faculties, and Provost. In 1967 he resigned from his administrative duties to focus on teaching and writing until his retirement in 1975. Over seven decades, Barzun had written and edited more than forty books touching on an unusually broad range of subjects, including science and medicine; psychiatry from Robert Burton through William James to modern methods; art; and classical music - he was one of the all-time authorities on Hector Berlioz. After a period of poor health, he was advised that he had several years of life ahead, and this encouraged him to complete his last and largest book, From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life, 1500 to the Present (2000), which became an unexpected bestseller and critically acclaimed success. Dr. Barzun was widely known in America and in Europe as a trenchant critic of modern trends in education, music and the arts, and he is also a specialist in musical history. Among his many commendations, he had been featured on the cover of Time magazine (1956); he was awarded the Gold Medal for Criticism from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, to which society he was elected in 1952 and twice served as its president; and he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003 and he was awarded the 2010 National Humanities Medal by President Obama. Jacques Barzun died October 25, 2012, at the age of 104 in San Antonio, Texas.
 
30Name:  Dr. George F. Bass
 Institution:  Texas A & M University
 Year Elected:  1989
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  March 2, 2021
   
 
George F. Bass graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with an M.A. in Near Eastern archaeology and attended the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. From 1957 to 1959 he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, and then began doctoral studies in classical archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1960 he learned to dive so that he could direct the first archaeological excavation of an ancient shipwreck, a Bronze Age wreck off Turkey. While excavating Byzantine shipwrecks off Turkey, Dr. Bass developed a submersible decompression chamber, a method of mapping under water by stereo-photogrammetry, and a two-person submarine, the Asherah, which was launched in 1964. That same year, he joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty. In 1967 his team was the first to locate an ancient wreck with sonar. In 1968 and 1971, he returned to land excavations in Greece and Italy. In 1973, Dr. Bass founded the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, which in 1976 affiliated with Texas A&M University, where, until his retirement in 2000, he was the George T. and Gladys H. Abell Distinguished Professor of Nautical Archaeology. He also held the George O. Yamini Family Chair. He is currently Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Texas A & M. The Institute conducts research on four continents, but Dr. Bass concentrates on Mediterranean sites from the Bronze Age though Byzantine times. Dr. Bass has received a National Medal of Science, the Archaeological Institute of America's Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement, the Bandelier Award from the Institute of Nautical Archaeology which accompanied a lectureship established in his name at the Archaeological Institute of America, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Explorers Club, the J.C. Harrington Medal from the Society for Historical Archaeology, the National Geographic Society's La Gorce Medal, and one of its fifteen Centennial Awards. Dr. Bass holds honorary doctorates from Boghaziçi University in Istanbul and the University of Liverpool. He is also an honorary citizen of Bodrum, Turkey. Dr. Bass was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1989. He died on March 2, 2021.
 
31Name:  Dr. Walter J. Bate
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1966
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402. Criticism: Arts and Letters
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  7/26/99
   
32Name:  Albert C. Baugh
 Year Elected:  1946
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1891
 Death Date:  3/21/81
   
33Name:  Professor Mary Beard
 Institution:  Newnham College, University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Mary Beard is one of Britain’s best-known Classicists - a distinguished Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge where she has taught for the last 27 years. She has written numerous books on the Ancient World, including the 2008 Wolfson Prize-winner, Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town which portrays a vivid account of life in Pompeii in all its aspects from food to sex to politics. Previous books include The Roman Triumph, Classical Art from Greece to Rome and books on the Parthenon and the Colosseum as part of a series on wonders of the world. Her interests range from the social and cultural life of Ancient Greece and Rome to the Victorian understanding of antiquity. In addition Mary is Classics editor of the Time Literary Supplement and writes an engaging, often provocative, blog, A Don’s Life, a selection of which has been published in book form. In 2008 Mary was visiting Sather Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where she gave a series of lectures on Roman laughter, one of her current research interests. In 2011 Mary delivered the prestigious Mellon Lectures at the National Art Gallery, Washington on the imagery of the Caesars. Mary’s academic achievement was acknowledged, in 2010, by the British Academy which elected her as a Fellow and in October 2011 Mary was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as a Foreign Honorary Member. Books: All in a Don’s Day (Profile Books, 2012); The Parthenon (Profile Books, new edition 2010); It's a Don's Life (Profile Books, Nov. 2009); Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town (Profile Books, 2008); The Roman Triumph (Harvard University Press, 2007); The Colosseum (with Keith Hopkins, Profile Books, 2005, new edition 2011); Classical Art from Greece to Rome (with John Henderson, Oxford University Press, 2001); The Invention of Jane Harrison (Harvard University Press, 2000); Religions of Rome (with John North and Simon Price, Cambridge University Press, 1998); Classics: A Very Short Introduction (with John Henderson, Oxford paperbacks, new edition 2000); Rome in the Late Republic (with Michael Crawford, Gerald Duckworth & Co, new edition 2000); S.P.Q.R.: A History of Ancient Rome (2015).
 
34Name:  Dr. Hans-Georg Beck
 Institution:  University of Munich
 Year Elected:  1988
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1910
 Death Date:  5/25/99
   
35Name:  Dame Gillian Beer
 Institution:  University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Gillian Beer is a preeminent interpreter of the Victorian novel, particularly of George Eliot and that daughter of the Victorians, Virginia Woolf. Even more importantly, she has been a pioneer in investigating the relations between scientific discourse and imaginative writing in 19th century England. She is particularly known for her work on Darwin, interpreting the imaginative energies and structures of his writings, so as to account for their cultural, in addition to their scientific, importance. She is equally eminent as a leader in English education and in English cultural life in general. She is the author of: Meredith: A Change of Masks, (1970); Darwin's Plots: Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eliot and Nineteenth Century Fiction, (1983); George Eliot, (1986); Arguing With the Past, (1989); Forging the Missing Link, (1992); Open Fields: Science in Cultural Encounter, (1996); and Virginia Woolf: The Common Ground, (1996). Gillian Beer was awarded the 2017 Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism for her book Alice in Space: The Sideways Victorian World of Lewis Carroll. She was vice-president of the British Academy and is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.
 
36Name:  Charles H. Beeson
 Year Elected:  1940
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1872
 Death Date:  12/26/49
   
37Name:  Dr. Hans Belting
 Institution:  Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften, Vienna
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Hans Belting is perhaps Germany's most creative art historian. In his College Art Association citation he is described as "the most influential scholar of medieval art of his generation," having made "fundamental contributions to the history of Byzantine wall painting and manuscript illumination, Carolingian art in Rome and Gaul, Italian Trecento mural decoration and early Flemish panel painting." His many books are based on a wide spectrum of methods: traditional style and iconographic analysis, reception theory, archaeological and anthropological techniques and the critique of patronage. But he has also contributed powerfully to contemporary theory in the discipline, particularly in The End of the History of Art, and to the history and criticism of contemporary art. Dr. Belting's other published works include Likeness and Presence: A History of the Image Before the Era of Art (1984); The Germans and Their Art: A Troublesome Relationship (1998); The Invisible Masterpiece: The Modern Myths of Art (2001); and Hieronymus Bosch: The Garden of Earthly Delights (2002). Formerly the Mary Jane Crowe Professor at Northwestern University and the director of the Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften in Vienna, Dr. Belting is a member of the Medieval Academy of America; the American Academy of Arts & Sciences; the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften; and the Academia Europaea. He received his Ph.D. from Mainz University in 1959.
 
38Name:  Dr. Margaret Bent
 Institution:  All Souls College, Oxford
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Margaret Bent read Music at Cambridge (where she was Organ Scholar at Girton College), gaining the Ph.D. in 1969 with a dissertation on the early fifteenth century Old Hall Manuscript. She taught peripatetically and at Goldsmiths’ College, London, before going to the United States in 1975, holding professorships and departmental chairmanships successively at Brandeis (1975-81) and Princeton Universities (1981-92), when she returned to the U.K. as the first woman Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, of which she is now an Emeritus Fellow. She is a Fellow of the British Academy, an honorary Fellow of Girton College, and was appointed CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 2008. She holds honorary doctorates from the universities of Glasgow, Notre Dame and Montréal. Honorific or corresponding memberships or fellowships include the American Musicological Society (of which she was President 1984-6), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Historical Society, Academia Europea , the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Medieval Academy of America, the London University School of Advanced Studies, the Royal Musical Association. Her most recent visiting professorships were at Villa I Tatti, Florence, and the Universities of Chicago, Harvard and Basel, and she serves on a number of editorial boards. In 2019 she shared the Guido Adler Prize of the International Music Association with fellow APS member Lewis Lockwoord, in honor of "scholars who have made an outstanding contribution to musicology." Apart from a critical edition of Rossini’s opera Il Turco in Italia, her publications range widely over English, French and Italian music of the 14th to 16th centuries, including editions (some joint) of John Dunstaple, Old Hall, English masses, and Johannes Ciconia. A facsimile and study of the 15th-century Veneto manuscript Bologna Q15: The Making and Remaking of a Musical Manuscript (LIM, Lucca, 2008) won the Claude Palisca prize of the AMS. Other books include: Counterpoint, Composition, and Musica Ficta (London and New York: Routledge, 2002); Fauvel Studies: Allegory, Chronicle, Music and Image in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS français 146, ed. Margaret Bent and Andrew Wathey (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998); Margaret Bent and Robert Klugseder, A Veneto Liber cantus (c. 1440): Fragments in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich, and the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna (Wiesbaden: Reichert, 2012). Full listing of publications can be accessed at http://www.all-souls.ox.ac.uk/people.php?personid=4 (classified by subject) and http://www.music.ox.ac.uk/index.php?id=844 (chronological). Known for revisionist and often controversial contributions in several areas of late-medieval music theory and practice, her work has overturned long-held suppositions about manuscript relationships and datings, meanings of notational signs, interpretations of medieval writings, and modern historiographical impositions (notably concepts of isorhythm, chromaticism, diminution). Starting points are nearly always manuscripts, notation, archives, texts, genres (especially motets). She addresses compositional and analytical techniques, counterpoint, musical grammar and rhetoric, the construing and complementing of notations, codicological and stemmatic issues. She has described (and sometimes discovered) manuscript fragments and reconstructed their music, and is currently documenting musical networks in the Veneto. She co-founded the Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music (http://www.diamm.ac.uk/), continues to lead early music seminars and singing sessions from original notation in facsimile in Oxford, and is a closet pianist, viol player and Wagnerian. Margaret Bent was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
39Name:  Dr. Gerald E. Bentley
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  1970
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1901
 Death Date:  7/25/94
   
40Name:  Sir Isaiah Berlin
 Institution:  All Souls College
 Year Elected:  1975
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  407. Philosophy
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1909
 Death Date:  11/5/97
   
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