American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Resident[X]
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4. Humanities[X]
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1Name:  Dr. Peter Brooks
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402b
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
Peter Brooks received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1965. That same year he joined the faculty of Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature until June, 2009. During his tenure, he has been director of the literature major, chairman of the department of French, and founding director of the Whitney Humanities Center. He is one of the most distinguished literary scholars of his generation, a generation dominated by theoretical discovery and debate. Peter Brooks has achieved an original and highly influential syntheses of his own. His contribution to the study of narrative has been particularly notable because of the connections he has established between the narrative impulse and form and sexuality and between narrative and legal argument. Several of his works have become classics of criticism, and many of his ideas have become common currency among literary scholars. Dr. Brooks is also known to a wider audience through articles in magazines and The New York Times. He is the author of The Novel of Worldliness: Crébillon, Marivaux, Laclos, Stendhal (1969); The Melodramatic Imagination: Balzac, Henry James (1976, 1985, 1995); Reading for the Plot: Design and Intention in Narrative (1984, 1992); Body Work: Objects of Desire in Modern Narrative (1993); Psychoanalysis and Storytelling (1994); World Elsewhere (1999); Troubling Confessions: Speaking Guilt in Law and Literature (2000); and Henry James Goes to Paris (2007), which won the Christian Gauss Award from Phi Beta Kappa. He is the editor of (with A. Kernan, M. Holquist) Man and his Fictions: An Introduction to Fiction-Making, its Forms and Uses (1973); and (with A. Woloch) Whose Freud? The Place of Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Culture (2000). Dr. Brooks was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003. He was given the Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award in 2008 and began teaching at Princeton University.
 
2Name:  Dr. Joseph Connors
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Joseph Connors studied at Boston College and Cambridge University before receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1978. He taught in the department of art history and archaeology at Columbia University from 1980-2002, with a leave to serve as Director of the American Academy in Rome from 1988-92. He became Director of Villa I Tatti, the Harvard Center for the Study of the Italian Renaissance in Florence, in 2002. From an initial study of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri in Rome he has deepened and extended our knowledge of the architecture and urban development of Baroque Rome, in particular the way in which elites and institutions express power relationships through changes in the urban fabric. He received the Richard Krautheimer Medal in 1984 and the Premio Letterario Rebecchini (with Louise Rice) in 1991. He is the author of one book on Frank Lloyd Wright and several on Roman baroque architecture: Borromini and the Roman Oratory: Style and Society, 1980; Specchio di Roma barocca (with Louise Rice), 1991; Francesco Borromini: Opus Architectonicum, 1998; and Alleanze e inimicizie: L'urbanistica di Roma barocca, 2005. A major monograph on the architecture of Francesco Borromini (1599-1667) is in preparation. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
3Name:  Dr. Caryl Emerson
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402b
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Caryl Emerson received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1980. She was assistant and associate professor of Russian literature at Cornell University from 1980-87. In 1988 she became the A. Watson Armour III University Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Princeton University, a position she currently holds. Caryl Emerson is widely regarded within the academic profession as the pre-eminent Slavist of her generation. She has also won a large readership outside the university as a prolific contributor to the popular press, reviewing many books for the New Republic, Opera News, New York Times Book Review, etc., and contributing program essays on Russian opera to Stagebill. Her public-spiritedness comes through in her list of conference appearances (ca. 10 a year) on Bakhtin, and she is chiefly responsible for his current vogue. In addition to the books listed below, she has published 70 articles. In 1997 she received the Howard T. Behrman Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities. Dr. Emerson is the author of The Life of Musorgsky (1999); The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin (1997); (with R.W. Oldani) Modest Musorgsky and Boris Godunov: Myths, Realities, Reconsiderations (1994); (with W. Morson) Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Prosaics (1990); Boris Godunov: Transpositions of a Russian Theme (1986); and editor of Rethinking Bakhtin: Extensions and Challenges, (1989). She has been the general editor of the monograph series "Studies in Russian Literature and Theory" at Northwestern University Press since 1992. She has served on the editorial boards of Comparative Literature; Literary Imagination; Russian Review; Slavic and East European Journal; and Tolstoy Studies Journal. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
4Name:  Dr. Michael Fried
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Michael Fried received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1969 and continued at Harvard as assistant and associate professor of fine arts. In 1975 he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University and is currently the J.R. Herbert Boone Professor of Humanities. Michael Fried has combined pioneering work in the history of art with groundbreaking art criticism. He is also a poet. His early criticism of the work of Jules Olitski, Frank Stella, and Anthony Caro, among others, helped to define modernist art of the 1960s in ways that are still influential. His Absorption and Theatricality: Painting and Beholder in the Age of Diderot revolutionized the study of 18th century French art. Through close, extensive analysis of both paintings and literary and dramatic texts, Dr. Fried came to a new understanding of the painting as tableau, and of the role of the beholder, thereby changing an entire field of inquiry. There followed a series of closely argued monographs around the theme of realism, which were devoted to the work of Courbet, Eakins, and Manet. Dr. Fried's sustained critical thinking about realism has now extended to German 19th century painting with the publication of his book on Adolf Menzel. Dr. Fried's A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art on the subject of Caravaggio inspired both the scholarly audience and the more general public. Today, he is one of a handful of historians working successfully across national and chronological boundaries. Michael Fried is the author of Morris Louis (1971); Powers (poems, 1973); Absorption and Theatricality: Painting and Beholder in the Age of Diderot (1980, awarded 1980 Gottschalk Prize); Realism, Writing, Disfiguration: On Thomas Eakins and Stephen Crane (1987, awarded 1990 Charles C. Eldredge Prize); Courbet's Realism (1993); To the Center of the Earth (poems, 1994); Manet's Modernism or The Face of Painting in the 1860s (1996); Art and Objecthood: Essays and Reviews (1998); Menzel's Realism: Art and Embodiment in Nineteenth-Century Berlin (2002); The Next Bend in the Road (poems, 2004); and Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before (2008). He was awarded the 2000 Prix Littéraire Etats-Unis/France, given to a book that contributes to mutual understanding between the two cultures. In 2004 he received a Mellon Distinguished Achievement Award. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
5Name:  Dr. Bruce W. Frier
 Institution:  University of Michigan Law School
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Bruce Frier is the leading scholar of Roman law in the U.S. today. In a fashion unique among Roman historians, he combines deep traditional philological skills with command of a wide array of methods from the social sciences. His innovative studies have shown how legal developments served the interests of a broad spectrum of propertied Romans and how law became a profession for the first time in history. His casebook on delicts has educated a generation of American students. The foremost demographer of antiquity in this country and the first to bring sophisticated quantitative methods to this subject, Dr. Frier has been a professor of classics at the University of Michigan since 1983.
 
6Name:  Dr. Michael McCormick
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Michael McCormick received his Doctorate at the Université Catholique de Louvain in 1979. He joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University later that year and was a research associate at Dumbarton Oaks from 1979-87. He moved to Harvard University in 1991, where he is currently Goelet Professor of Medieval History. Michael McCormick is among the most original and productive medieval historians active in the United States and Europe today. His early work was on 11th- and 12th-century historiography. He then published an important book on rulership in Late Antiquity. Meanwhile, he discovered five hundred previously-unknown dry-point glosses in the celebrated Palatine manuscript of Virgil. Most recently he published an impressive volume - the most important contribution to the subject since Pirenne's Mohammed and Charlemagne - on East-West communications and commerce in the early Middle Ages. Dr. McCormick is the author of Les annales du haut moyen âge (1975); (with P. Fransen) Index scriptorum operumque latino-belgicorum medii aevi. Nouveau répertoire des oeuvres médiolatines belges, III partie, vol. I: XII siècle, Oeuvres hagiographiques (1977); Index scriptorum operumque latino-belgicorum medii aevi. Nouveau répertoire des oeuvres médiolatines belges, III partie, vol. II: XII siècle, Oeuvres non hagiographiques (1979); Eternal Victory: Triumphal Rulership in Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and the Early Medieval West (1986); Five Hundred Unknown Glosses from the Palatine Virgil (Vat. Pal. Lat. 1631) (1992); and Origins of the European Economy: Communications and Commerce, A.D. 300-900 (2001). He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
7Name:  Dr. Gloria Ferrari Pinney
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
Born in Italy, Gloria Ferrari Pinney received her Laurea in Lettere Classiche at Università degli Studi in Rome in 1964. In 1976 she received her Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. She was a professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology for twelve years at Bryn Mawr College. In 1993 she became a professor in the departments of Art and Classical Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. She has been Professor of Classical Archaeology at Harvard University since 1998, a post from which she retired in 2003. Gloria Ferrari Pinney combines a deep knowledge of classical philology and keen artistic sensitivity with a penetrating critical acumen that allows her to reach unprecedented and often revolutionary conclusions about even well-known ancient monuments. Her pioneering study on the origin of Asiatic sarcophagi was in fact disregarded by scholars for almost twenty years until excavational finds confirmed her hypothesis. Within her great range, she is an expert in Greek vase painting, with emphasis on iconography, yet two of her recent publications - on the North metopes of the Parthenon (2000) and the architecture of the Archaic Akropolis (2002) - are among her most startling contributions. Although well versed in current art-historical and linguistic theory, she produces terse and concise analyses that carry conviction with their strict logic. Some of her publications include Il commercio dei sarcofagi asiatici (1966); "Achilles Lord of Scythia," Ancient Greek Art and Iconography (1983); "For the Heroes are at Hand," The Journal of Hellenic Studies (1984); "Eye-cup," Revue Archeologique (1986); "Pallas and Panathenaea," Proceedings, 3rd Symposium on Ancient Greek and Related Pottery (1988); Materiali del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Tarquinia XI: I vasi attici a figure rosse del periodo arcaico (1988); "Figures in the Text: Metaphor and Riddles in the Agamemnon," Classical Philology (1997); "The Geography of Time," Ostraka (2000); Figures of Speech: Men and Maidens in Ancient Greece (2002); and "The Ancient Temple on the Acropolis at Athens," American Journal of Archaeology (2002). Dr. Pinney was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
Election Year
2003[X]