American Philosophical Society
Member History

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403. Cultural Anthropology[X]
1Name:  Dr. Lothar von Falkenhausen
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Lothar von Falkenhausen is the leading archaeologist of China of his generation. A polyglot like few others, he has taught—each time in the local language—as Visiting Professor in Beijing, Münster, Hong Kong, Kyoto, Paris, and Heidelberg. His most recent book Chinese Society in the Age of Confucius (2006), by now translated into Japanese, Chinese, and Korean, is the definitive social history of bronze age China. His vast list of publications ranges from antiquarianism to ancient musical instruments, and further on to ancient salt production, empire and urban studies, questions of literacy and orality in the Chinese canon, philosophical perspectives in Chinese ritual, religious mortuary practices, and social ranking in tombs. His work is as transnational as it is interdisciplinary, ranging across continents and centuries, and combining archaeology with intellectual, social, technological, and economic history.
 
2Name:  Dr. Kent V. Flannery
 Institution:  University of Michigan
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1934
   
 
Kent Flannery is an internationally renowned archaeologist who is justifiably recognized as one of the most important theorists in the field today. The James Bennett Griffin Distinguished University Professor of Anthropological Archaeology at the University of Michigan since 1985, he has made outstanding and lasting contributions to the field of archaeology over the past four decades not only in the realms of theory and method but substantively as well. He has significantly advanced scholarly understanding of the rise of agriculture in both the Old and New Worlds, with his research and writings having provided a number of important insights into the growth of preindustrial civilizations. In particular, he has convincingly demonstrated how material and ideological factors are inextricably linked in the development of cultural complexity. The field research of Dr. Flannery and his collaborators on the ancient Zapotec civilization in Mexico is especially notable in this regard. Dr. Flannery received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1964 and has served on the University of Michigan faculty since 1967. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1978; the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1998; and the American Philosophical Society in 2005.
 
3Name:  Dr. Clifford Geertz
 Institution:  Institute for Advanced Study
 Year Elected:  1972
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  October 30, 2006
   
4Name:  Dr. Ward H. Goodenough
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1973
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  June 9, 2013
   
 
Anthropologist Ward Goodenough ably bridged the gap between traditional ethnology and studies of cultural change. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1919, he was educated at Cornell and Yale Universities and taught at the University of Wisconsin from 1945-49 before joining the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. He was appointed professor of anthropology in 1962 and became University Professor Emeritus in 1989. Dr. Goodenough's interests included cultural and linguistic anthropology; social organization; anthropology of law; culture theory; and semantics. He conducted extensive fieldwork in Oceania, from Micronesia to New Guinea, and he had served as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford (1958), as president of the American Ethnological Association (1962) and the Society for Applied Anthropology (1963), and as editor of The American Anthropologist (1966-70). His publications include Property, Kin and Community of Truk (1951), Native Astronomy in the Central Carolinas. (1953) and Cooperation in Change (1963). Along with his anthropological work, Dr. Goodenough also wrote poetry and composes music. Ward Goodenough was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1973. He died on June 9, 2013, at the age of 94, in Haverford, Pennsylvania.
 
5Name:  Dr. Patrick Vinton Kirch
 Institution:  University of Hawai'I at Manoa; University of California, Berkeley & P.A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Unsurpassed as a prehistorian of the Pacific, Patrick Kirch was curator of the P. A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology and Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is now Chancellor's Professor Emeritus and Professor of the Graduate School, Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology and Integrative Biology Emeritus. In 2019 he moved to the University of Hawai'i as a professor of anthropology. In a succession of outstanding contributions, he has shown how Pacific islanders have made changing adaptations to life in the islands over 3,000 years, exemplifying regional archaeology at its best and greatly clarifying our knowledge of the important Lapita cultural horizon of the first and second millennia BC. His book The Wet and the Dry makes a convincing case for recognizing the importance of intensification of agriculture in connection with shifting cultivation and tree crops as well as through irrigation in environments where irrigation is not feasible. He also demonstrates that, contrary to widely held theory, irrigation systems do not require centralized state authority for their development, maintenance, and management. Dr. Kirch's intellectual interests are broad, incorporating geology, botany, and cultural anthropology into his archaeological research. A native of Hawaii, Dr. Kirch has published numerous other works relating to the Pacific, including Marine Explorations in Prehistoric Hawaii (1979), Tikopia: The Prehistory and Ecology of a Polynesian Outlier (1982); The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms (1984); and Feathered Gods and Fishhooks: An Introduction to Hawaiian Archaeology Prehistory (1985). He holds a Ph.D. from Yale University (1975).
 
6Name:  Dr. Ludwig Koenen
 Institution:  University of Michigan
 Year Elected:  1991
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1931
   
 
Ludwig Koenen has taught at the University of Michigan since 1975. As Herbert C. Youtie Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Papyrology, he is regarded as one of the world's most renowned papyrologists. His research has centered primarily on the religious history of the Roman Empire, especially the period in which Orthodox Christianity became established as a state religion. He has served as chair of the university's Department of Classical Studies and has overseen the organization, cataloguing and preparation for publication of its papyri collection, the largest in the Western Hemisphere. Dr. Koenen received his Ph.D. from the University of Cologne in 1957 and taught there from that time until his tenure at Michigan. He has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and, since 1975, has been a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute. He has also served as president of the American Philological Association.
 
7Name:  Dr. Alexander H. Leighton
 Institution:  Harvard University & Dalhousie University
 Year Elected:  1950
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1908
 Death Date:  August 11, 2007
   
8Name:  Dr. Joyce Marcus
 Institution:  University of Michigan
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Joyce Marcus is Robert L. Carneiro Distinguished University Professor and Curator of Latin American Archaeology at the University of Michigan. A major figure in American archaeology, she is a prolific scholar who has made key contributions to understandings of the ancient civilizations of the Zapotecs (Mexico), the Maya (Mexico and Central America), and the Incas and their predecessors (Peru). With great theoretical sophistication, she has advanced archaeological knowledge on such key topics as pre-Columbian urban and political development in Mexico, the evolution of Zapotec civilization in Oaxaca over two millennia, and the nature of ancient Mesoamerican writing systems. Her writings are widely read and cited and are highly influential in the field. Dr. Marcus's publications include Emblem and State in the Classic Maya Lowlands: An Epigraphic Approach to Territorial Organization (1976); Mesoamerican Writing Systems: Propaganda, Myth, and History in Four Ancient Civilizations (1992); and (with K. Flannery) Zapotec Civilization: How Urban Society Evolved in Mexico's Oaxaca Valley (1996). She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974 and has served on the University of Michigan faculty since 1976. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1997) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1997). Joyce Marcus was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
9Name:  Dr. Mary Miller
 Institution:  Getty Research Institute
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Mary Miller became Director of the Getty Research Institute on January 1, 2019. She was Sterling Professor of History of Art at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College from 2008-2014. Mary Miller has held many administrative posts at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College 2008-2014. From 2016-18, she was Senior Director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage on Yale’s West Campus. In that capacity, she advanced the sustainable care, study, and use of the world’s cultural heritage through multidisciplinary research, innovation in technology and conservation practice, education, and advocacy. Professor Miller is a specialist of the art of the ancient New World and has been recognized for both her scholarly contributions and her curatorial expertise. She curated The Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in 2004 and co-curated landmark exhibition The Blood of Kings with Linda Schele at the Kimbell Art Museum in 1986. For both exhibitions, she co-wrote the catalogues of the same title, the former with Simon Martin, and the latter with Linda Schele. Among her many books are The Murals of Bonampak, The Art of Mesoamerica (now entering its 6th edition), Maya Art and Architecture (with Megan O’Neil), The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (with Karl Taube), and A Pre-Columbian World (co-edited with Jeffrey Quilter). With Barbara Mundy, Miller edited Painting a Map of Mexico City, a study of the rare indigenous map in the Beinecke Library (2012); and with Claudia Brittenham, she wrote The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (2013). For her work on ancient Mexico and the Maya, Miller has won national recognition including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Getty Grant. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. She delivered the Fifty-ninth A W Mellon lectures at the National Gallery of Art in 2010 and the Slade Lectures at Cambridge University in 2015. A national Phi Beta Kappa lecturer in 2016-17, she will be OCAT lecturer in Beijing later in 2021.
 
10Name:  Dr. Sally Falk Moore
 Institution:  Peabody Museum, Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  May 2, 2021
   
 
Sally Falk Moore was Professor of Anthropology (emerita) at Harvard University, where she served as Dean of the Graduate School from 1985-89. Intermittently, she also has taught "Anthropological Approaches to Law" at Harvard Law School. She has an L.L.B. from Columbia Law School (1945). Her major anthropological fieldwork has been in East Africa. Her books include Power and Property in Inca Peru (1958), Law as Process (1978), Social Facts and Fabrications: "Customary" Law on Kilimanjaro 1880-1980 (1986), Anthropology and Africa (1994), and most recently a reader, Law and Anthropology (2005). She is a past president of the American Ethnological Society and the Society for Political and Legal Anthropology. She was elected Huxley Medalist and Lecturer for 1999 by the Royal Anthropological Institute and has been awarded the Kalven Prize by the Law and Society Association (2005). She died on May 2, 2021.
 
11Name:  Dr. Gloria Ferrari Pinney
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
Born in Italy, Gloria Ferrari Pinney received her Laurea in Lettere Classiche at Università degli Studi in Rome in 1964. In 1976 she received her Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. She was a professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology for twelve years at Bryn Mawr College. In 1993 she became a professor in the departments of Art and Classical Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. She has been Professor of Classical Archaeology at Harvard University since 1998, a post from which she retired in 2003. Gloria Ferrari Pinney combines a deep knowledge of classical philology and keen artistic sensitivity with a penetrating critical acumen that allows her to reach unprecedented and often revolutionary conclusions about even well-known ancient monuments. Her pioneering study on the origin of Asiatic sarcophagi was in fact disregarded by scholars for almost twenty years until excavational finds confirmed her hypothesis. Within her great range, she is an expert in Greek vase painting, with emphasis on iconography, yet two of her recent publications - on the North metopes of the Parthenon (2000) and the architecture of the Archaic Akropolis (2002) - are among her most startling contributions. Although well versed in current art-historical and linguistic theory, she produces terse and concise analyses that carry conviction with their strict logic. Some of her publications include Il commercio dei sarcofagi asiatici (1966); "Achilles Lord of Scythia," Ancient Greek Art and Iconography (1983); "For the Heroes are at Hand," The Journal of Hellenic Studies (1984); "Eye-cup," Revue Archeologique (1986); "Pallas and Panathenaea," Proceedings, 3rd Symposium on Ancient Greek and Related Pottery (1988); Materiali del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Tarquinia XI: I vasi attici a figure rosse del periodo arcaico (1988); "Figures in the Text: Metaphor and Riddles in the Agamemnon," Classical Philology (1997); "The Geography of Time," Ostraka (2000); Figures of Speech: Men and Maidens in Ancient Greece (2002); and "The Ancient Temple on the Acropolis at Athens," American Journal of Archaeology (2002). Dr. Pinney was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003.
 
12Name:  Dr. Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway
 Institution:  Bryn Mawr College
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1929
   
 
Brunilde Ridgway is the Rhys Carpenter Professor Emerita of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College. Born and educated in Italy, she received a Laurea in Lettere Classiche from the University of Messina in 1953. Earning her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Bryn Mawr, she joined the faculty there in 1957 as an assistant instructor and remained at the College until her retirement in 1994. Dr. Ridgway is a meticulous scholar, a dynamic and dedicated teacher and a passionate advocate of modern critical appreciation of ancient art. With a specialty in Greek sculpture, her understanding of the cultural context and talent for guiding the mind and eye have made seminal contributions to modern awareness of the meaning and quality of ancient works of art in civic, religious and architectural settings, and their impact on contemporaries as well as postclassical generations. In addition to a vigorous teaching and lecture schedule, Brunilde Ridgway is the author or coauthor of sixteen books, including a now three-volume set entitled Hellenistic Sculpture which covers the period from 331 to 31 B.C. She has also published 101 articles and 124 book reviews and, from 1977 to 1985, served as Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Archaeology. She delivered the 1981-82 Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures at the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome and the 1996 Sather Classical Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Ridgway is the recipient of the 1988 Gold Medal from the Archaeological Institute of America and of honorary degrees from Union College and Georgetown University. Her teaching awards include the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (1981) and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education's National Gold Medal as well as the title of Pennsylvania Professor of the Year (1989). Dr. Ridgway was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1993. In 2006 she was awarded the Society's 2006 Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities for her work "The Study of Greek Sculpture in the Twenty-first Century".
 
13Name:  Dr. Jeremy A. Sabloff
 Institution:  Santa Fe Institute; University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Jeremy A. Sabloff served as President of the Santa Fe Institute from 2009 to 2015 and continues as an external professor. He also is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and held the position of Williams Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1994 to 2004. Dr. Sabloff's research centers on archaeological theory and method and the history of American archaeology as well as the nature of ancient civilizations. More specifically, he studies pre-industrial urbanism and the use of settlement pattern studies to illuminate the development of urban organization. His field research has focused on the Maya lowlands and the study of the transition from Classic to Postclassic Maya civilization. Dr. Sabloff is the former president of the Society for American Archaeology and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1969 and has previously held positions at Harvard and the Universities of New Mexico, Utah and Pittsburgh. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1996. In 2016 he received the Kidder Award from the American Anthropological Association.
 
14Name:  Dr. Evon Zartman Vogt
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  May 13, 2004
   
15Name:  Dr. Anthony F. C. Wallace
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1969
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1923
 Death Date:  October 5, 2015
   
 
Anthony F.C. Wallace embarked on an anthropological career at a young age as a research assistant to his father, ethnologist and historian Paul A.W. Wallace in the 1930s. After briefly studying at Lebanon Valley College, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, which assigned him to the 14th Armored Division which, in 1945, participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp. After his discharge, Dr. Wallace began a lifelong association with the University of Pennsylvania's anthropology department, of which he eventually became chair. Bringing to the discipline a unique blend of ethnology and history influenced by the social, behavioral and biological sciences, he became one of the pioneers in the development of ethnohistory as a distinct field. Dr. Wallace made important contributions to our knowledge of Native American personality, kinship studies, the effects of stress, and religious cults and movements and developed new insights into the ways in which indigenous peoples react to the pressures of modern Western civilization. Among his many projects, he spent nearly 20 years researching a detailed study of Seneca Indian society, and he had written multiple books exploring native-white relations in America, particularly government policy towards Native Americans. Throughout his career, Dr. Wallace also conducted a number of studies of the psychological effects of disasters and of modern social behaviors, from watching television to inhabiting a high-rise building. His many publications include Culture and Personality (1961), Religion: An Anthropological View (1966), Death and Rebirth (1970) and Thomas Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans (1999). In combining social and psychological processes toward the understanding of personality, religion and modern and indigenous societies, Dr. Wallace was without peer. He became University Professor of Anthropology Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987, but he remained an active and influential scholar, frequently lecturing on the benefits and limitations of local history. Documents from his professional and personal life, including drafts, correspondence, research notes and photographs, comprise a large part of the Wallace Family Collection, which is housed in the American Philosophical Society Library. He had been elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1969. Anthony Wallace died October 5, 2015, at the age of 92.
 
16Name:  Dr. Patty Jo Watson
 Institution:  Washington University; University of Montana
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1932
   
 
Patty Jo Watson received a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1959. At Washington University since 1969, she is currently Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology. She is the recipient of the Fryxell Medal from the Society for American Archaeology, the Distinguished Service Award from the American Anthropological Association, and the Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement from the Archaeological Institute of America. Dr. Watson is the author of The Prehistory of Salts Cave, Kentucky (1969); Archaeological Ethnography in Western Iran (1979); (with others) Man and Nature (1969); Explanation in Archaeology (1971); Archaeological Explanation (1984); Girikihaciyan - A Halafian Site in Southeastern Turkey; and Archaeology of the Middle Green River Region, Kentucky (2005). She was the editor, and author in part, of Archaeology of the Mammoth Cave Area (1974); editor (with others) Prehistoric Archaeology Along the Zagros Flanks (1983); and co-editor of The Origins of Agriculture (1991) and Of Caves and Shell Mounds (1996). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the American Anthropological Association and the Society for American Archaeology (editor, American Antiquity, 1984-87), and she is an Honorary Life Member of the National Speleological Society. She has served on the governing board of the Archaeological Institute of America and the executive board of the Center for American Archeology, as well as on the editorial board of the Journal of Cave and Karst Sciences, and of Anthropology Today (Royal Anthropological Institute). In 2007 she received the Archaeological Institute of America's Pomerance Award for Scientific Contributions to Archaeology. Patty Jo Watson has made major contributions in archaeological theory, archaeological method, and archaeological practice in North America, Western Asia, and China. Explanation in Archaeology is a landmark in the EuroAmerican theory debates of the 1970s and is still current in discussions of archaeological theory. Her pioneering work in ethnoarchaeology in Iran, and later on flotation techniques for recovering plant remains are extremely influential contributions to archaeological practice in the Americas, Europe, and China. Her 35 years of research in Kentucky caves has provided crucial evidence about the pre-maize, indigenous agricultural complex developed in Eastern North America. The wide scope and the depth of these contributions make Patty Jo Watson one of the most preeminent archaeologists of her generation. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2000.
 
17Name:  Dr. Irene J. Winter
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Born in New York City, Irene Winter received her AB in Anthropology from Barnard College (1960), her MA in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures from the University of Chicago (1967), and her PhD from Columbia University in the History of Art and Archaeology (1973). She taught at Queens College, CUNY, from 1971-1976, at the University of Pennsylvania from 1976-1988, and is presently Boardman Professor of Fine Arts Emerita at Harvard University, having served on the faculty from 1988 to 2009, and as Department Chair from 1993-1996. In 1996-97 she was Slade Professor at Cambridge University, delivering the Slade Lectures in the Spring of 1997. She subsequently delivered the Flexner Lectures at Bryn Mawr College in 1999, and in the Spring of 2005 presented the Andrew H. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery in Washington, DC. Professor Winter has participated in archaeological excavations at Godin Tepe and Hasanlu, Iran, and at Tell Sakhariyeh, Iraq, with additional comparative fieldwork in India. Her awards include a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship (1983-88), along with an Olivia James travel Grant of the Archaeological Institute of America, and a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Fellowship. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1999, was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in 2003-04, was named a Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, in 2005, received the Medal of Distinction from Barnard College in 2009, and was designated an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2013. She has served on the Board of the College Art Association, several editorial and grants boards, and the Scientific Committee of the International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East since its inception in 1988. She has also been a member of the Iraq Task Force of the Archaeological Institute of America. Her principal work has been devoted to the art and archaeology of the Ancient Near East, writing on topics ranging from ivory carving and cylinder seals to royal sculpture. Throughout her career, her stress has been on the relationship between the visual arts, language, history and culture in an attempt to join empirical data with theory in an inter-disciplinary context. Two volumes of collected essays, published by Brill, appeared in 2010, entitled On Art in the Ancient Near East. The Mellon lectures will be published as Visual Affect: Aesthetic Experience and Ancient Mesopotamia.
 
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