American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
International (2)
Resident (6)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
403. Cultural Anthropology[X]
1Name:  Dr. Clifford Geertz
 Institution:  Institute for Advanced Study
 Year Elected:  1972
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  October 30, 2006
   
2Name:  Dr. Ward H. Goodenough
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1973
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  June 9, 2013
   
 
Anthropologist Ward Goodenough ably bridged the gap between traditional ethnology and studies of cultural change. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1919, he was educated at Cornell and Yale Universities and taught at the University of Wisconsin from 1945-49 before joining the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. He was appointed professor of anthropology in 1962 and became University Professor Emeritus in 1989. Dr. Goodenough's interests included cultural and linguistic anthropology; social organization; anthropology of law; culture theory; and semantics. He conducted extensive fieldwork in Oceania, from Micronesia to New Guinea, and he had served as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford (1958), as president of the American Ethnological Association (1962) and the Society for Applied Anthropology (1963), and as editor of The American Anthropologist (1966-70). His publications include Property, Kin and Community of Truk (1951), Native Astronomy in the Central Carolinas. (1953) and Cooperation in Change (1963). Along with his anthropological work, Dr. Goodenough also wrote poetry and composes music. Ward Goodenough was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1973. He died on June 9, 2013, at the age of 94, in Haverford, Pennsylvania.
 
3Name:  Dr. Alexander H. Leighton
 Institution:  Harvard University & Dalhousie University
 Year Elected:  1950
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1908
 Death Date:  August 11, 2007
   
4Name:  Dr. Larissa Adler Lomnitz
 Institution:  Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  April 19, 2019
   
 
Larissa Adler Lomnitz is a pioneer in the study of social networks who earned her Ph.D. from the Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico in 1974. Her classic study of poor families in Mexico City showed how they mobilize social capital to survive under marginal economic conditions by using fictive kinship to expand networks and gain access to resources while diversifying risks. Her study of a Mexican entrepreneurial family, in contrast, revealed that elites limit their social networks to conserve social capital and marshal trust. Her study of school teachers in Chile drew upon social networks in much the same way as lower class urban dwellers to survive in the wake of restructuring. Based on this work, she developed an influential theory of informal network exchange that formed the basis of network theory in migration studies and social capital theory. She has also done formative work on the socialization of scientists and professionals within developing country settings. She won the Mexican National Prize for Social Science in 1990. She is the author of a number of books, including: Migration and Networks in Latin America, 1974; Networks and Marginality, 1975; (L. Adler Lomnitz, et al) Culture & Ideology: Anthropological Perspectives, 1982; (with M. Perez-Lizaur) A Mexican Elite Family, 1820-1980: Kinship, Class, and Culture, 1988; (with L. Meyer) La Nueva Clase, 1988; (L. Adler Lomnitz, et al) Chile’s Middle Class: A Struggle for Survival in the Face of Neoliberalism, 1991; Redes Sociales, Cultura, y Poder: Ensayos de Antropología Latinoamericana, 1994; (with A. Melnick) Chile’s Political Culture and Parties: An Anthropological Explanation, 2000; (with R. Salazar Elena, I. Adler) Simbolismo y Ritual en la Política Mexicana, 2004. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2011.
 
5Name:  Dr. Sally Falk Moore
 Institution:  Peabody Museum, Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  May 2, 2021
   
 
Sally Falk Moore was Professor of Anthropology (emerita) at Harvard University, where she served as Dean of the Graduate School from 1985-89. Intermittently, she also has taught "Anthropological Approaches to Law" at Harvard Law School. She has an L.L.B. from Columbia Law School (1945). Her major anthropological fieldwork has been in East Africa. Her books include Power and Property in Inca Peru (1958), Law as Process (1978), Social Facts and Fabrications: "Customary" Law on Kilimanjaro 1880-1980 (1986), Anthropology and Africa (1994), and most recently a reader, Law and Anthropology (2005). She is a past president of the American Ethnological Society and the Society for Political and Legal Anthropology. She was elected Huxley Medalist and Lecturer for 1999 by the Royal Anthropological Institute and has been awarded the Kalven Prize by the Law and Society Association (2005). She died on May 2, 2021.
 
6Name:  Professor Chie Nakane
 Institution:  University of Tokyo
 Year Elected:  1977
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  October 12, 2021
   
 
Social anthropologist Chie Nakane is a respected scholar who has spent a lifetime studying human societies and chronicling her theories. One of the first women to graduate from the University of Tokyo, Ms. Nakane was the University's first female professor and the first female member of the Japan Academy. Now a professor emeritus, she traces her profound interest in social anthropology to her teenage years when she returned to Japan after living in China and was struck by the cultural and social differences between the two countries. After receiving her M.A. in 1950, she embarked on a career investigating Asian societies, including those of Japan, India, China and her special area of expertise, Tibet. In 1987, she won a Japan Foundation Award for this comparative research. Ms. Nakane's incisive study of Japan is presented in her seminal book, Japanese Society, which offers insight into what distinguishes Japanese society from other complex societies. Published in 1970, the book characterizes Japan as being built on a vertical organizational principle where a hierarchical order based on rank prevails. Ms. Nakane's other works include Kinship and Economic Organization in Rural Japan (1967) and Human Relationships in Japan (1972).
 
7Name:  Dr. Evon Zartman Vogt
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1918
 Death Date:  May 13, 2004
   
8Name:  Dr. Anthony F. C. Wallace
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  1969
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  403. Cultural Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1923
 Death Date:  October 5, 2015
   
 
Anthony F.C. Wallace embarked on an anthropological career at a young age as a research assistant to his father, ethnologist and historian Paul A.W. Wallace in the 1930s. After briefly studying at Lebanon Valley College, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, which assigned him to the 14th Armored Division which, in 1945, participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp. After his discharge, Dr. Wallace began a lifelong association with the University of Pennsylvania's anthropology department, of which he eventually became chair. Bringing to the discipline a unique blend of ethnology and history influenced by the social, behavioral and biological sciences, he became one of the pioneers in the development of ethnohistory as a distinct field. Dr. Wallace made important contributions to our knowledge of Native American personality, kinship studies, the effects of stress, and religious cults and movements and developed new insights into the ways in which indigenous peoples react to the pressures of modern Western civilization. Among his many projects, he spent nearly 20 years researching a detailed study of Seneca Indian society, and he had written multiple books exploring native-white relations in America, particularly government policy towards Native Americans. Throughout his career, Dr. Wallace also conducted a number of studies of the psychological effects of disasters and of modern social behaviors, from watching television to inhabiting a high-rise building. His many publications include Culture and Personality (1961), Religion: An Anthropological View (1966), Death and Rebirth (1970) and Thomas Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans (1999). In combining social and psychological processes toward the understanding of personality, religion and modern and indigenous societies, Dr. Wallace was without peer. He became University Professor of Anthropology Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987, but he remained an active and influential scholar, frequently lecturing on the benefits and limitations of local history. Documents from his professional and personal life, including drafts, correspondence, research notes and photographs, comprise a large part of the Wallace Family Collection, which is housed in the American Philosophical Society Library. He had been elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1969. Anthony Wallace died October 5, 2015, at the age of 92.
 
Election Year
2011 (1)
2005 (1)
1999 (1)
1977 (1)
1973 (1)
1972 (1)
1969 (1)
1950 (1)