American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
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1Name:  Dr. Kathleen Mary Coleman
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Kathleen Coleman specializes in Latin literature and the social history and material culture of the early Roman empire. She was born in what is now Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1953. After taking degrees at the University of Cape Town and the University of Rhodesia (now the University of Zimbabwe), she received her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 1979. She then returned to the University of Cape Town to join the faculty, before taking up the Chair of Latin (1870) at Trinity College Dublin in 1993. In 1998 she moved to Harvard University, where she was named the James Loeb Professor of the Classics in 2010. She has published editions, with commentary, of Book 4 of the Siluae of Statius and the Liber spectaculorum of Martial, both with Oxford University Press. In tackling the latter project, she undertook an extensive investigation of Roman spectacle and punishment, for which much of the evidence survives in inscriptions and artefacts, rather than in literary sources. The result has been a long series of articles on various aspects of the culture and mentality that fueled the displays of the Roman amphitheatre. The combination of literature, epigraphy, and material culture has become a major focus of her research, leading her to such diverse topics as the ancient schoolroom, Roman mosaics, and the gardens of the Mediterranean world. She has also published articles on sociolinguistic features of Latin texts - specifically on parenthetical remarks in poems composed by Statius to honor his patrons and on bureaucratic language in official correspondence between the younger Pliny and the emperor Trajan - and she has published several studies of classical resonances in the work of the twentieth-century South African poet, Douglas Livingstone. She has delivered lectures on five continents, including the Jerome Lectures at the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (2010), and memorial lectures in honor of Sir Ronald Syme in Wellington, New Zealand (2008) and Oxford (2018). She has held fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (1987-88, 1992), the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2013-14), and the Institute for Advanced Study (2017-18). In 2012 she was elected a Corresponding Member of the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften and in 2020 a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. In 2011 she served as the President of the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and in 2020 she was elected President of the Internationale Thesaurus-Kommission, the international committee that oversees the publication of the Thesaurus linguae Latinae, which was begun in 1894 and comprises the most comprehensive lexicon of the Latin language ever undertaken. At Harvard, she has received multiple awards for teaching and mentoring: a Harvard College Professorship (2003-08); the Joseph R. Levenson Teaching Prize for Senior Faculty, awarded by the Undergraduate Council (2005); the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2019); and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Graduate Student Council (2020). Her greatest ambition is to visit every Roman province.
 
2Name:  Dr. Ronald Egan
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Ronald Egan is Confucius Institute Professor of Sinology in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in Chinese literature from Harvard University, writing a dissertation on the early historical work Zuo zhuan under the direction of James Robert Hightower. His research focuses on Chinese literature, aesthetics, and cultural history of the Tang-Song period. His publications include books on the literary works and lives of Ouyang Xiu and Su Shi, the latter entitled Word, Image, and Deed in the Life of Su Shi. He has also published a general study of innovations in Song dynasty aesthetic thought, entitled The Problem of Beauty: Aesthetic Thought and Pursuits in Northern Song Dynasty China, now available in a Chinese edition from Shanghai Ancient Books Publishing Company. He is also the translator of selected essays from Qian Zhongshu’s Guanzui biani, which appeared as Limited Views: Essays on Ideas and Letters by Qian Zhongshu. A recent study concerns the works and reception history of the great woman poet of the twelfth century, Li Qingzhao, entitled The Burden of Female Talent: The Poet Li Qingzhao and Her History in China (Harvard University Press, 2013), also now available in a Chinese edition from Shanghai Ancient Books. Subsequently, he published a complete new translation of Li Qingzhao writings, available in a bilingual edition in the Library of Chinese Translations series (De Gruyter, 2019). He previously taught at the Harvard University, Wellesley College, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and UCLA. At UC Santa Barbara, where he taught for twenty-five years, he was the founding chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. He formerly served as Executive Editor of the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies and as President of the American Oriental Society.
 
3Name:  Dr. Elizabeth Anderson
 Institution:  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Elizabeth Anderson is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women’s & Gender Studies at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. In 1987, she earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard University, and joined the Philosophy Department at University of Michigan. Professor Anderson designed University of Michigan’s Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program, and was its founding director. She has won fellowships from the ACLS and Guggenheim Foundations, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the British Academy, served as President of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association, and is a 2019 MacArthur Fellow. She is the author of Value in Ethics and Economics (Harvard UP, 1993), The Imperative of Integration (Princeton UP, 2010), Private Government (How Employers Rule our Lives, and Why We Don’t Talk About It) (Princeton UP, 2017) and numerous, widely reprinted articles in journals of philosophy, law, and economics. She specializes in moral and political philosophy, social and feminist epistemology, and the philosophy of the social sciences. She has written extensively on egalitarianism, the interaction of facts and values in social science research, the intersection of democratic theory and social epistemology, and pragmatism. Her current research reconsiders the history of the Protestant work ethic from the 17th century to 21st century neoliberalism.
 
4Name:  Dr. Moshe Halbertal
 Institution:  Hebrew University; New York University Law School
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Moshe Halbertal is Professor of Jewish Thought and Philosophy at Hebrew University and Gruss Professor of Law at the New York University Law School. He earned his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 1989. Moshe Halbertal is known for applying deep knowledge of ancient philosophical traditions to modern questions of democratic theory. He was a co-author of Israel’s military code of ethics and speaks widely on the current challenges confronting constitutional democracy. He spends every fall semester at New York University where, despite lacking a law degree, he is a tenured law professor. Colleagues there praise the insights he brings to questions of U.S. constitutional law. He has been a visiting professor at many U.S. law schools, including Yale, Harvard, and Penn. His publications include: People of the Book: Canon, Meaning and Authority, 1997; By Way of Truth: Nahmanides and the Creation of Tradition, 2006; Concealment and Revelation: Esotericism in Jewish Thought and its Philosophical Implications, 2007; (with D. Hartman) Judaism and the Challenges of Modern Life, 2007; On Sacrifice, 2012; Maimonides: Life and Thought, 2013; (with S. Holmes) The Beginning of Politics: Power in the Biblical Book of Samuel, 2017; The Birth of Doubt: Confronting Uncertainty in Early Rabbinic Literature, 2020. He won the Goldstein-Goren Book Award in 1997 and the National Jewish Book Award in 2013. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2021.
 
5Name:  Dr. Deborah Howard
 Institution:  St. John's College, University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Deborah Howard is Professor Emerita of Architectural History at the University of Cambridge, where she is a Fellow of St John’s College. A graduate of Cambridge University (Newnham College, 1964-68, first class honours), she did her postgraduate studies at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London (MA with distinction 1969; PhD 1973). After a research Fellowship at Clare Hall, Cambridge, she taught at University College London, the University of Edinburgh and the Courtauld Institute, before returning to the University of Cambridge in 1992. She was appointed to a Personal Chair in Architectural History in 2001 and served as Head of the Department of History of Art for six years (2002-9, with sabbatical break) before retiring in 2013. On her retirement, her contribution was recognised by two Festschrift volumes, edited by Nebahat Avcıoǧlu, Emma Jones and Allison Sherman (2016-2018). She has an honorary doctorate from University College Dublin (2014). In 2010 Howard was elected a Fellow of the British Academy. She is also a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Honorary Fellow of the Royal Incorporation of Architects of Scotland and Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She has held visiting appointments at Yale (summer Term program in London), Harvard (Aga Khan program and the Villa I Tatti), the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, Smith College, Princeton, and the Universities of Melbourne and Queensland. Among her many committee memberships she served on two Royal Commissions in Scotland between 1987 and 1999 and was Chairman of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain from 1997 to 1999. She was a Trustee of British Architecture Library Trust (2001-10) and a non-executive Director of the British Architectural Trust Board (2011- 16). Since 2011 she has been a board member of the Centro di Studi di Architettura ‘Andrea Palladio’ in Vicenza. She is a Trustee of Venice in Peril, and was elected an Honorary Patron Member of the Society of Architectural Historians of GB in 2020. Her principal research interests are the art and architecture of Venice and the Veneto; music and architecture in the Renaissance; and the relationship between Italy and the Eastern Mediterranean. In 2005 she established the Centre for Architectural and Musical Experiments in Renaissance Architecture (CAMERA) at Cambridge, supported by grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the British Academy and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation. She was one of the leaders of a major four-year ERC-funded research project entitled Domestic Devotions: The Place of Piety in the Italian Renaissance home 1400-1600 (2013-7). She has recently completed a research project funded by the Leverhulme Trust on the proto-industrial architecture of the Veneto. Her monographs include Venice Disputed: Marc’Antonio Barbaro and Venetian Architecture 1550-1600 (Yale UP, 2011); Venice and the East: the Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture 1100-1500 (Yale UP, 2000); Scottish Architecture from the Reformation to the Restoration 1560 - 1660 (Edinburgh UP, 1995); The Architectural History of Venice (rev. edn. Yale UP, 2002, 1st edn. Batsford 1980); Jacopo Sansovino: Architecture and Patronage in Renaissance Venice (Yale University Press, 1975; rev. 1987). She is the joint author, with Mary Laven and Abigail Brundin, of The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy (Oxford UP, 2018). With Laura Moretti she co-authored Sound and space in Renaissance Venice: Architecture, Music, Acoustics (Yale UP, 2009). 2011. She particularly enjoys collaborative projects that give opportunities to younger scholars, usually resulting in co-edited books. Among these are La Chiesa di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venezia (ed. with Isabella Cecchini and Massimo Bisson, Viella, 2018); Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy (ed. with Maya Corry and Mary Laven, exh. cat., Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge 2017); The Image of Venice: Fialetti’s View and Sir Henry Wotton (ed. with Henrietta McBurney, London 2014); Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari: Immagini di Devozione, Spazi della Fede (ed. with Carlo Corsato, Padua 2015); Architecture and Pilgrimage 1000-1500: Southern Europe and Beyond (ed. with Paul Davies and Wendy Pullan, Ashgate Press, 2013); and The Music Room in Early Modern France and Italy: Sound, Space and Object (ed. with Laura Moretti, Oxford UP, 2012).
 
6Name:  Dr. Mary Miller
 Institution:  Getty Research Institute
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Mary Miller became Director of the Getty Research Institute on January 1, 2019. She was Sterling Professor of History of Art at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College from 2008-2014. Mary Miller has held many administrative posts at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College 2008-2014. From 2016-18, she was Senior Director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage on Yale’s West Campus. In that capacity, she advanced the sustainable care, study, and use of the world’s cultural heritage through multidisciplinary research, innovation in technology and conservation practice, education, and advocacy. Professor Miller is a specialist of the art of the ancient New World and has been recognized for both her scholarly contributions and her curatorial expertise. She curated The Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in 2004 and co-curated landmark exhibition The Blood of Kings with Linda Schele at the Kimbell Art Museum in 1986. For both exhibitions, she co-wrote the catalogues of the same title, the former with Simon Martin, and the latter with Linda Schele. Among her many books are The Murals of Bonampak, The Art of Mesoamerica (now entering its 6th edition), Maya Art and Architecture (with Megan O’Neil), The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (with Karl Taube), and A Pre-Columbian World (co-edited with Jeffrey Quilter). With Barbara Mundy, Miller edited Painting a Map of Mexico City, a study of the rare indigenous map in the Beinecke Library (2012); and with Claudia Brittenham, she wrote The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (2013). For her work on ancient Mexico and the Maya, Miller has won national recognition including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Getty Grant. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. She delivered the Fifty-ninth A W Mellon lectures at the National Gallery of Art in 2010 and the Slade Lectures at Cambridge University in 2015. A national Phi Beta Kappa lecturer in 2016-17, she will be OCAT lecturer in Beijing later in 2021.
 
7Name:  Dr. Richard J. Powell
 Institution:  Duke University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Richard J. Powell is the John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art & Art History at Duke University, where he has taught since 1989. After receiving his B.A. at Morehouse College, he earned the M.F.A. from Howard University. Shortly thereafter Powell completed a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship in Museum Education at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and, after a brief teaching stint in Virginia, he entered Yale University, where he received the M.A. in African American Studies and the M.Phil. and Ph.D. in the History of Art. While attending Yale, Powell was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, which enabled him to conduct dissertation research in Copenhagen's National Museum of Denmark and throughout several Scandinavian countries. It was during Powell's time at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that he became interested in art criticism and organizing art exhibitions. In 1979 the Studio Museum in Harlem enlisted Powell as guest curator for Impressions/Expressions: Black American Graphics, one of the first art museum surveys of works by African American printmakers. After Powell's year in Denmark, he settled in Washington, D.C. where, while completing his dissertation under the auspices of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, he became Director of Programs for the Washington Project for the Arts (WPA): one of several alternative art spaces in the 1980s whose contemporary exhibitions and programs fueled that era's "culture wars." As a visual artist, Powell has exhibited his prints and drawings in group and solo exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad and, in the 1980s, worked as a periodical and book illustrator, most notably for: The Massachusetts Review; Callaloo; Roseann Bell, Bettye Parker and Beverly Guy Sheftall's Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature (1979); and Jessica Hagedorn's Pet Food and Tropical Apparitions (1981). His works are in the permanent collections of the Bradford Art Galleries and Museums (Bradford, UK), the Library of Congress, the Yale University Art Gallery, and in many private hands. Richard J. Powell, a recognized authority on African American art and culture, has organized numerous art exhibitions, most notably: The Blues Aesthetic: Black Culture and Modernism (1989); Rhapsodies in Black: Art of the Harlem Renaissance (1997); To Conserve A Legacy: American Art at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (1999); Back to Black: Art, Cinema, and the Racial Imaginary (2005); and Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist (2014). Among the major museums where his curated exhibitions have been presented are the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the New Orleans Museum of Art, London's Whitechapel Art Gallery, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Along with teaching courses in American art, the arts of the African Diaspora, and contemporary visual studies, he has written extensively on topics ranging from primitivism to postmodernism, including such titles as Homecoming: The Art and Life of William H. Johnson (1991), Black Art: A Cultural History (1997, 2002 & 2021), Cutting a Figure: Fashioning Black Portraiture (2008), and Going There: Black Visual Satire (2020). From 2007 until 2010, Powell was Editor-in-Chief of The Art Bulletin, the world’s leading English language journal in art history. In 2013 Powell received the Lawrence A. Fleischman Award for Scholarly Excellence in the Field of American Art History from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, and in 2016 was honored at the College Art Association's Annual Conference as the year's most Distinguished Scholar. In 2018 Powell was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
 
8Name:  Dr. Sarah Stroumsa
 Institution:  Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Sarah Stroumsa is the Alice and Jack Ormut Professor Emerita of Arabic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her academic education at the Hebrew University, as well as at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. She taught in the Department of Arabic Language and Literature and the Department of Jewish Thought at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she served as Vice-Rector and then as Rector. She is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, as well as of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. She is a laureate of the Humboldt Research Award, a holder of the Italian Order of Merit, and a recipient of the Leopold Lucas Prize. Her academic focus is the history of philosophical and theological thought in Arabic in the early Islamic Middle Ages, and the medieval Judaeo-Arabic philosophical literature. She strives to offer a multifocal approach to the study of intellectual history, an approach she used in her publications as well as in the Intellectual Encounters of the Islamicate World, a master’s program she initiated with her colleagues Sabine Schmidtke and Sari Nusseibeh. Among her published books in English: Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn al-Rāwaādī, Abū Bakr al-Rāzī, and Their Impact on Islamic Thought (Leiden: Brill, 1999); Maimonides in his World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker (Princeton: Princeton University, 2010); Dāwūd al-Muqammaṣ, Twenty Chapters (Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2016); and Andalus and Sefarad: On Philosophy and Its History in Islamic Spain (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019). Her current work focuses on methodological questions in the study of medieval intellectual history (e.g. linear and non-linear tracing of influences, the reliability of unique sources, and the reconstruction of unwritten elements of the texts, such as mimic and tone).
 
Election Year
2021[X]