American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
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1Name:  Dr. Caroline Bruzelius
 Institution:  Duke University
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Caroline Bruzelius, Professor Emerita at Duke University, has published many books and articles on medieval architecture in France and Italy. She has written on the abbey St.-Denis, medieval Naples, the architecture of women’s convents, and the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, among other topics. Her most recent book, Preaching, Building and Burying: Friars in the Medieval City, focused on how Franciscans and Dominicans transformed medieval cities through their social practices, which included creating piazzas for outdoor preaching and building massive convents with funding provided by lay donors. Bruzelius has been a pioneer in exploring how technologies can transform our understanding of historic monuments and communicate narratives about art and the built environment. She founded the "Wired!" group at Duke University, a team that integrates visualization technologies with teaching, engaging undergraduate and graduate students in multi-year research initiatives http://www.dukewired.org . She founded two international and interdisciplinary collaborations, Visualizing Venice: http://www.visualizingvenice.org/visu/ a project that models time and change in the remarkable city of Venice, and The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database http://kos.aahvs.duke.edu, a virtual museum that collects images of historic sites in South Italy for researchers and travelers. From 1994 to 1998 Bruzelius was Director of the American Academy in Rome. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Medieval Academy of America, the Society of Antiquaries (London) and has received numerous other awards in the United States and abroad.
 
2Name:  Dr. Angela N. H. Creager
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1963
   
 
Angela Creager is the Thomas M. Siebel Professor in the History of Science at Princeton University. She graduated from Rice University with a double major in biochemistry and English and completed a Ph.D. in biochemistry in the laboratory of Howard K. Schachman at the University of California, Berkeley, where she developed an interest in the history of biology. Supported by postdoctoral awards, she retrained as a historian of science at Harvard University and MIT, then joined the History faculty at Princeton University. She specializes in the history of biomedical research, from virology, as featured in The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965, to the history of environmental health and regulation. In 2018, her book Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine was awarded the Patrick Supper Prize in the History of Science by the American Philosophical Society. She also received an NSF CAREER Award in 1999 and the Price/Webster Prize from the History of Science Society in 2009. She served as President of the History of Science Society in 2014-2015. From 2016 to 2020 she was Director of Princeton’s Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies, where she oversaw residential fellowships and seminars and on the themes of "Risk and Fortune" and "Law and Legalities." She becomes chair of Princeton’s History Department on July 1, 2020. Angela Creager was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
3Name:  Dr. Maribel Fierro
 Institution:  CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Maribel Fierro is Research Professor at the Institute of Languages and Cultures of the Mediterranean (ILC) at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC = Higher Council for Scientific Research) in Spain. She has taught at the Universidad Complutense and Universidad Autónoma (Madrid), and at the Universities of Stanford, Chicago, Exeter and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Paris). She was trained in Semitic Philology (with an interest in Arabic) at the Universidad Complutense where she submitted her PhD Thesis in 1985 after carrying out part of her doctoral research at the School of Oriental and African Studies. She was then Lecturer at the Universidad Complutense (Madrid) and in 1987 moved to the CSIC. Her interests are the political, religious and intellectual history of the pre-modern Islamic West (al-Andalus and North Africa), Islamic law, the construction of orthodoxy, violence and its representation in Medieval Arabic sources, and the edition and translation of Medieval Arabic texts. Among her publications: Abd al-Rahman III: The first Cordoban caliph (2005) and The Almohad revolution: Politics and religion in the Islamic West during the twelfth-thirteenth centuries (2012). She is the editor of volume 2 The Western Islamic world, eleventh-eighteenth centuries of the The New Cambridge History of Islam (2010), Orthodoxy and heresy in Islam: Critical Concepts in Religious Studies (2013) and the The Routledge Handbook on Muslim Iberia (2020). She has co-edited El cuerpo derrotado: cómo trataban musulmanes y cristianos a los enemigos vencidos (Península Ibérica, ss. VIII-XIII) (The defeated body: how Muslims and Christians treated the vanquished. Iberian Peninsula 8th-13th centuries) (2008), The legal status of dimmi-s in the Islamic West (2013) and Accusations of unbelief in Islam: A diachronic perspective on takfir (2015). She is presently preparing a monograph on Abd al-Mu,min, the first Almohad caliph and on The turban in al-Andalus, and co-editing Rulers as authors in Islamic societies. https://digital.csic.es/cris/rp/rp04381 http://csic.academia.edu/maribelfierro
 
4Name:  Dr. Catherine Gallagher
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Catherine Gallagher is Ida May and William J Eggers, Jr. Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1979, where she has spent most of her career. As a consequence of Catherine Gallagher's theoretical work (she is one of the co-founders, expositors and leading practitioners of new historicism); her institutional contributions (she is one of the founding members of the important journal Representations and a long-time member of the School of Criticism and Theory); her commitment to issues of gender, class, and race in the literary canon; and her historically and philosophically informed readings of both canonical and non-canonical texts, Gallagher is one of the most influential literary critics of her generation. She has also been one of the most important teachers of the past four decades: she trained scores of graduate students; started new programs like that in human rights at Berkeley; edited important document collections; and taught in a variety of innovative undergraduate programs. Among the awards, prizes, and other distinctions Catherine Gallagher has won are a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1988, the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association in 1994, and the Jacques Barzun Prize of the American Philosophical Society in 2018. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2002) and the American Academy in Berlin (2010). Her bibliography includes: The Industrial Reformation of English Fiction: Social Discourse and Narrative Form, 1832-67, 1985; (edited with T. Laqueur) The Making of the Modern Body: Sexuality and Society in the Nineteenth Century, 1987; Nobody's Story: The Vanishing Acts of Women Writers in the Marketplace, 1670-1820, 1994; (edited with S. Stern) Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave, by Aphra Behn, 1999 (with S. Greenblatt) Practicing New Historicism, 2000; The Body Economic: Life, Death, and Sensation in Political Economy and the Victorian Novel, 2006; Telling It Like It Wasn’t: The Counterfactual Imagination in History and Fiction, 2018. Catherine Gallagher was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
5Name:  Dr. Eva Schlotheuber
 Institution:  Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf; German Historical Association
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Eva Schlotheuber's enthusiasm for medieval manuscripts, art and literature started at Göttingen, studying with Hartmut Hoffmann, one of the leading scholars of manuscript and archival studies. A year abroad in Copenhagen reading anthropology and experimental archaeology added to this the material side of history and environmental studies. Working at the intersection of these disciplines has never ceased to fascinate her and she has continued working on little known primary material and hidden archival sources from an interdisciplinary perspective. A particular focus has been how religious orders structure and communicate knowledge, particularly looking at how religious women staked out their claim in medieval society; she has worked closely with colleagues around the world, among them Jeffrey Hamburger (Art History, Harvard) and Margot Fassler (Musicology/Liturgy, Notre Dame). Currently, she is editing together with Henrike Lähnemann (German Studies, Oxford) what is probably the largest corpus of medieval writing by women, 1.800 letters collected in a Northern German convent (The Nuns' Network). A second area of research revolves round the influence which poets and humanists such as Dante and Petrarch had on political theory and governance structure in the 14th century, and how new collective norms are formed in times of crisis. The critical evaluation and contextualisation of sources of all kind is a particular strength of medieval studies which is crucial in understanding how systems of knowledge are changing. We can build upon this highly developed source critizism for meeting the challenges of our networked digital age. This is a challenge which can only be met by working together across the Humanities and Sciences and jointly developing a vision for the future which is collaborative. Eva Schlotheuber was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
6Name:  Professor David Tracy
 Institution:  University of Chicago Divinity School and the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
David Tracy is the Andrew Thomas Greeley and Grace McNichols Greeley Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Catholic Studies, and Professor Emeritus of Theology and the Philosophy of Religions at the University of Chicago Divinity School and the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought. A noted teacher, scholar, philosopher of religion and theologian, Tracy earned his doctorate in 1969 at the Gregorian University in Rome. He taught at the Catholic University of America from 1967 to 1969, when he joined the faculty at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He was also a member of the Committee on Social Thought. His courses focused on a wide variety of courses in philosophy, in historical and contemporary theology, in philosophical systematic and constructive theology and hermeneutics, and on issues and persons in religion and modern thought—and as well as other courses on Greek and modern tragedy in the university’s Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies. He was one of the founding editors of Religious Studies Review and for many years on the editorial board of Concilium. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1982 and has lectured in universities and colleges in the United States and around the world, including Scotland, where he delivered the prestigious Gifford lectures which were established to promote and diffuse the study of natural theology. His publications include Blessed Rage for Order (1979), The Analogical Imagination (1981), Plurality and Ambiguity (1987), Dialogue with the Other: The Inter-religious Dialogue (1990), On Naming the Present: Reflections on God, Hermeneutics, and Church (1994) and two books of his essays - Fragments: the Existential Situation of Our Time (2020) and Filaments: Theological Profiles (2020). He is currently writing a book based on his Gifford lectures, "Infinity and Naming God." David Tracy was elected a member of the Americn Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
7Name:  Dr. David Wellbery
 Institution:  Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Born in Cooperstown, New York in 1947, David Wellbery received his B.A. degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton (1969) and his Ph.D. from Yale University (1977). From 1975 to 1989, he was on the faculty in German Studies and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. From 1990 to 2001, he was the William Kurrelmeyer Professor of German at Johns Hopkins University. In 2001, he joined the faculty at the University of Chicago, where he holds the LeRoy T. and Margaret Deffenbaugh Carlson University Professorship in Germanic Studies and the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought. At Chicago, Wellbery also directs the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on German Literature and Culture. He has held guest professorships at Princeton University, the Universities of Bonn and Copenhagen, and the State University of Rio de Janeiro. In 1989-90, he was a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin; from 1994 to 1996, he was a regular Visiting Researcher at the Center for Literary Research in Berlin; in 2003-4, he was a Fellow at the Carl Friedrich von Siemens Foundation in Munich. He has been a Corresponding Member of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences since 2008. In 2009, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and to the German Academy for Language and Literature. In 2012, he became a member of the German National Academy of Science (Leopoldina). Wellbery holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Constance (2010). He is the recipient of the Research Prize of the Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation (2005), the Jacob-and-Wilhelm-Grimm Prize of the German Academic Exchange Service (2010), and the Golden Medaille of the Goethe Society in Weimar (2019). Since 1998, Wellbery has served as co-editor of the Deutsche Vierteljahrsschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Geistesgeschichte. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
Election Year
2020[X]