American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
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1Name:  Dr. Jerome J. McGann
 Institution:  University of Virginia; University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Jerome McGann is John Stewart Bryan Professor in the Department of English at the University of Virginia. Ph.D., Yale University, 1966. He was Assistant Professor, University of Chicago, 1966-75; Professor, Johns Hopkins University, 1975-80; Dreyfuss Professor of the Humanities at the California Institute of Technology, 1980-86; Commonwealth Professor, University of Virginia, 1986-93; Thomas Holloway Professor of Victorian Studies, Royal Holloway College, University of London, 1999-2002. He has been Research Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley since 2007. No one has done as much to guarantee the future of digital Humanities as Jerome McGann. He was President of the Society for Textual Scholarship (1995-97). Dr. McGann is co-founder of the University of Virginia Speculative Computing Laboratory (SPECLAB), Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship (NINES), and The Ivanhoe Project. His first monumental book on textual theory, in which he developed the idea that one has to treat texts as socialized, came out of his work on the poetry of Byron. His interests rapidly moved in the direction of digital presentation of sources. His Dante Gabriele Rossetti archive at Virginia has been a model as to what it is possible to accomplish, and since setting that up he has been actively involved in all kinds of on-line procedures, of which his NINES project is only the latest manifestation. McGann has been the most important person in this entire area. Whereas others could simply have derived a new perspective from his Byron experience, McGann has used it as a way to rethink the entire editorial enterprise in terms of the web and on-line possibilities. This turns out to be particularly important for writers who were also engaged in art, such as Rossetti or Blake. He is the author of many books, including: A Critique of Modern Textual Criticism (1983); The Beauty of Inflections, Literary Investigations in Historical Method and Theory (1985); Social Values and Poetic Acts (1987); The Textual Condition, 1991; Byron and Romanticism, (2002); Radiant Textuality, Literature since the World Wide Web (2004); The Scholar’s Art, Literary Studies in a Managed World (2006); The Poet Edgar Allen Poe: Alien Angel (2014); and A New Republic of Letters: Humanities Scholarship in an Age of Digital Reproduction (2014). He was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1994. Jerome McGann has been the recipient of many prizes, including the Richard W. Lyman Award for Distinguished Contribution to Humanities Computing, the James Russell Lowell Award from The Modern Language Association, a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and a Thomas Jefferson Award from the University of Virginia. Jerome McGann was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
2Name:  Dr. W. J. T. Mitchell
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
W. J. T. Mitchell is Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, a quarterly devoted to critical theory in the arts and human sciences. A scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, Mitchell is associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). He is known especially for his work on the relations of visual and verbal representations in the context of social and political issues. Under his editorship, Critical Inquiry has published special issues on public art, psychoanalysis, pluralism, feminism, the sociology of literature, canons, race and identity, narrative, the politics of interpretation, postcolonial theory, and many other topics. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Morey Prize in art history given by the College Art Association of America. In 2003, he received the University of Chicago’s prestigious Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching. His publications include: "The Pictorial Turn," Artforum, March 1992; "What Do Pictures Want?" October, Summer 1996; What Do Pictures Want? (2005); The Last Dinosaur Book: The Life and Times of a Cultural Icon (1998); Picture Theory (1994); Art and the Public Sphere (1993); Landscape and Power (1992); Iconology (1987); The Language of Images (1980); On Narrative (1981); and The Politics of Interpretation (1984). During his editorship, Critical Inquiry has published issues on canon-formation, gender, race and writing, public art, politics and poetic value, metaphor, psychoanalysis, identity politics, pluralism, new directions in art history, questions of evidence, and many other special topics. Professor Mitchell has twice served as a Professor at the School of Criticism and Theory (Northwestern, 1983; Dartmouth, 1990), and he has lectured at universities and art museums throughout the United States, as well as in Europe and the Far East. Recent special teaching assignments include a Mellon Faculty Seminar at Tulane University, a seminar on Romanticism at Beijing Foreign Studies University in China, an NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers at the University of Chicago, a post as Canterbury Visiting Fellow at Canterbury University, New Zealand, a visiting professorship at the Institute for Art History, Aarhus, Denmark, and two visiting professorships at the Institute for Fine Arts and English Department at New York University in 1998 and 2000. The South African Council for Scientific Development sponsored his lectures in Capetown, Durban, and Johannesburg in the summer of 1997, and Duke University invited him to give the Benenson Lectures in Art History in the spring of 2000. In the spring of 2002 he was awarded the Berlin Prize Fellowship to the American Academy in Berlin, and in the fall of 2002 he delivered the Alfonso Reyes Lectures in Mexico City. Other recent lectures include the W. E. B. Du Bois lectures at Harvard, and the Patten Lectures at Indiana University. He was a a research fellow at the Clark Institute for Art History in the fall of 2008, and received the MLA’s 2006 James Russell Lowell Prize in Language and Literature for What Do Pictures Want?. His recent publications include two books: Cloning Terror: The War of Images, September 11 to Abu Ghraib, and Critical Terms in Media Studies (with Mark Hansen). Seeing Through Race, was published by Harvard University Press in the spring of 2012, followed closely in the spring of 2013 by Occupy: Three Inquiries in Disobedience, co-authored with Michael Taussig and Bernard Harcourt. He is currently working on a new book, Seeing Madness: Insanity, Media, and Visual Culture.
 
3Name:  Dr. Sarah B. Pomeroy
 Institution:  City University of New York
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
Sarah Pomeroy received a Ph.D. at Columbia University. She then studied Roman law at Columbia for two years. She joined the faculty of Hunter College and the Graduate Center at City University of New York in 1964 and in 2003 she became Distinguished Professor of Classics and History Emerita. Sarah Pomeroy has set her mark on the history of women, as the leading scholar of ancient Greek women’s history since the publication in 1975 of her ground-breaking book Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity. Her law degree and knowledge of papyrology have given her special access to under-used categories of primary evidence and allowed her to expand the range of women’s history, as well as ancient history. Her book Spartan Women was the first book-length examination of Spartan women ever published. In Women in Hellenistic Egypt, The Murder of Regilla: A Case of Domestic Violence in Antiquity, and in the recent Pythagorean Women, she uses archaeological evidence to flesh out the small bits of literary references available. The study of ancient history has benefited from her work through the widely used textbooks on ancient history on which she has collaborated with colleagues from different areas. She is also the author of Women in Hellenistic Egypt: From Alexander to Cleopatra (1990), Women’s History and Ancient History (1991), Xenophon’s Oeconomicus: A Social and Historical Commentary (1995), and Families in Classical and Hellenistic Greece: Representations and Realities (1999). Her book (with J. Kathirithamby) Mari Sibylla Merian: Artist, Scientist, Adventurer, won the 2018 Moonbeam Children's Book Award Gold Medal in the Non-Fiction Chapter Book category. Sarah Pomeroy was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
4Name:  Dr. Keren Rice
 Institution:  University of Toronto
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Keren Rice is a linguist at the University of Toronto. She has made contributions to the areas of theoretical phonology, theoretical morphology, language description, and community-academy linguistics. She focuses on the study of Athabaskan languages of northern Canada. Her book A Grammar of Slave (1989) was awarded the Leonard Bloomfield Book Award from the Linguistic Society of America for the best book of the year. She currently serves as chair of the Department of Linguistics, and she was the founding director of the Aboriginal Studies program at the University of Toronto. She served as editor of the journal International Journal of American Linguistics for thirteen years, and she has served as president of both the Canadian Linguistic Association and the Linguistic Society of America; she is president-elect of Section Z of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is University Professor and Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto, and the recipient of the Killam Prize and the Molson Prize, as well as an Officer of the Order of Canada and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2015 she was both elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was awarded the Pierre Chauveau Medal of the Royal Society of Canada.
 
5Name:  Dr. Moshe Sharon
 Institution:  The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Moshe Sharon, M.A., PhD was born in Haifa Israel on December 18, 1937 and received his higher education at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the SOAS University of London. He is a professor (Emeritus) of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies, and Chair in Bahá’í Studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in which he initiated the scholarly independent study of the Bahá’í Faith (in a non Bahá’í context, and within the wider study of modern religions and religious movements). Asked in 1984 to develop Jewish Studies at the University of the Witwaterstrand Johannesburg, South Africa, he established the Chair and Centre of Jewish Studies there and headed and directed it until 1993. Since 1968 Professor Sharon has been documenting and studying in depth the Arabic Inscriptions of the Holy Land and publishing them in multi-volume opus: Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum Palaestinae (CIAP, six books) concurrent with his many scholarly publications on Islamic history and civilization. Among these are Black Banners from the East in 2 volumes, by now classic on the earliest revolutionary movement in Islam; Judaism Christianity and Islam, Interaction and Conflict; Judaism in the Context of Diverse Civilizations; Studies in Modern Religions and Religious Movements (ed.); The Bahá’í Religion and its Most Holy Book and many more. Professor Sharon is one of foremost authorities on early ‘Abbasid history, History of the Holy Land under Islam, and a world expert on Arabic Epigraphy. In the field of public activity he served as Prime Minister Begin Advisor on Arab Affairs (1978-1980) and participated in the initial stages of the Israeli-Egyptian peace process. Later he was the Head of the Department of Arab Affairs in the IDF Central Command, advisor to the Minister of Defense, and special envoy to the Shi‘ites in Lebanon. More than a year ago he was appointed by a unanimous decision of the Government of Israel as Chairman of the Place-Name Committee responsible for the official fixing of all place names on the map of the country.
 
6Name:  Dr. Nicholas Sims-Williams
 Institution:  University of London
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Nicholas Sims-Williams is Research Professor of Iranian and Central Asian Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, whose faculty he joined in 1976. Nicholas Sims-Williams is an Iranologist, a philologist and linguist who has brought the little-known world of Iranian Central Asia to vivid life by his studies of religious texts, especially concerning Manichaeism and Buddhism, and everyday documents in a host of languages, above all Sogdian and Bactrian. The latter was practically lost to memory when Sims-Williams deciphered a trove of ancient legal documents and letters found in Afghanistan and identified their language as Bactrian, reconstructing its grammar and vocabulary and recovering six hundred years of a lost culture - "the most exciting discovery in Iranian Studies in the last two decades," as it was called in the introduction to his 2009 Festschrift. He was awarded the Prix Ghirshman of the Institut de France and the Hirayama Prize from the Institute of Silk Road Studies. Sims-Williams is the author of The Christian Sogdian Manuscript C2, 1985; Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Vol. I: Legal and Economic Documents, 2001; Recent Discoveries in the Bactrian Language and Their Historical Significance, 2004; (with F. de Blois) Dictionary of Manichaean Texts, Vol. II, Texts from Iraq and Iran, 2006; Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Vol. 2: Letters and Buddhist Texts, 2007. He is a member of the British Academy and the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, Institut de France. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
7Name:  Dr. Richard J. Tarrant
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Richard Tarrant was born in Brooklyn, NY and received his BA from Fordham University in 1966. He pursued graduate study at Oxford (Corpus Christi College) with support from Marshall and Danforth Scholarships, and obtained his D.Phil. In 1972. While at Corpus he was appointed to the P. S. Allen Junior Research Fellowship. In 1970 he took up a position at University College, Toronto, where he remained until moving to Harvard University in 1982. At Harvard he has been successively Professor of Greek and Latin, Carl A. Pescosolido Professor of Roman Civilization, and Pope Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. He was Acting Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1995-96 and Interim Dean in 2012. In 1991-92 he was Visiting Mellon Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and a Visiting Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. In 2008 he delivered the Comparetti Lectures at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa. His interests lie mainly in Latin literature, specifically Senecan drama and Augustan poetry, and in the transmission and editing of Latin texts; he has also explored the reception of classical literature in art and music. His books include editions with commentary of Seneca's Agamemnon (Cambridge UP 1977) and Thyestes (Scholars Press 1985), a critical edition of Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Oxford Classical Texts series (2004), and a commentary on Virgil Aeneid Book XII for Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics (2012); the last of these received the 2013 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit from the American Philological Association. He is also one of the main contributors to the volume Texts and Transmission: A Guide to the Latin Classics, edited by L. D. Reynolds (Oxford 1983). He is currently completing a book entitled Texts, Editors, and Readers: Methods and Problems in Latin Textual Criticism (to be published by Cambridge UP), is at work on a book on Horace's Odes for Oxford University Press, and is preparing a new critical edition of Horace for Oxford Classical Texts. He has been the editor of Phoenix (the journal of the Classical Association of Canada) and of Harvard Studies in Classical Philology; he has served as the Vice-President for Publications of the American Philological Association; and he is a member of the editorial boards of Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, Materiali e discussioni per l'analisi dei testi classici, and Toronto Medieval Latin Texts. His teaching at Harvard has been recognized with the Levenson Prize for Undergraduate Teaching, appointment as a Harvard College Professor, and the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Excellence in Teaching. He has twice been named a Walter Channing Cabot Fellow for contributions to scholarship. Since 1968 he has been married to Jacqueline Brown. His outside interests include baroque and classical music, choral singing, and all things Italian.
 
Election Year
2014[X]