American Philosophical Society
Member History

Results:  7 ItemsModify Search | New Search
Page: 1Reset Page
Residency
International (2)
Resident (5)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
1Name:  Dr. Julia Annas
 Institution:  University of Arizona
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Julia Annas is known for her work in ancient ethics and contemporary ethics, especially in the area of virtue ethics, where renewed interest in ancient ethics has stimulated many new developments. She studied the B.A. Literae Humaniores course at Oxford University (Greek and Latin language, literature, history and philosophy) and then received her Ph. D from Harvard University. She returned to Oxford and taught as a Lecturer and then Tutorial Fellow at St Hugh’s College for fifteen years, before becoming Professor (since 1995 Regents Professor) of Philosophy at the University of Arizona. She was the founding editor of Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy and has been joint editor for many years of the Oxford Aristotle monographs series. She has been a Senior Fellow of the Center for Hellenic Studies, President of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association and a Getty Scholar. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, an Honorary Fellow of St Hugh’s College, Oxford and an Honorary Doctor of the University of Uppsala. She has published many books and articles over a wide range of topics in ancient philosophy, with increasing focus on the areas of epistemology and ethics. Her 1993 The Morality of Happiness explored the structure of ancient ethical theories, starting from Aristotle and establishing the general outline of a kind of theory in which virtue and happiness are the central concepts (this is now often called eudaimonist virtue theory). Her 1999 Platonic Ethics Old and New carried the project backwards, looking at ethics in Plato, and forwards, to the more academic ethics of later Platonists. In the last two decades her work has integrated historical study of ancient texts and engagement with the resurgent field of virtue ethics. Her 2011 Intelligent Virtue presents an outline of a contemporary theory in which virtue and happiness are central, which can meet several different philosophical objections and serve as a promising model of ethical theory. She continues to work mainly on contemporary and historical theories of virtue and happiness. Julia Annas was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
2Name:  Dr. Margaret Bent
 Institution:  All Souls College, Oxford
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Margaret Bent read Music at Cambridge (where she was Organ Scholar at Girton College), gaining the Ph.D. in 1969 with a dissertation on the early fifteenth century Old Hall Manuscript. She taught peripatetically and at Goldsmiths’ College, London, before going to the United States in 1975, holding professorships and departmental chairmanships successively at Brandeis (1975-81) and Princeton Universities (1981-92), when she returned to the U.K. as the first woman Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, of which she is now an Emeritus Fellow. She is a Fellow of the British Academy, an honorary Fellow of Girton College, and was appointed CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 2008. She holds honorary doctorates from the universities of Glasgow, Notre Dame and Montréal. Honorific or corresponding memberships or fellowships include the American Musicological Society (of which she was President 1984-6), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Historical Society, Academia Europea , the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Medieval Academy of America, the London University School of Advanced Studies, the Royal Musical Association. Her most recent visiting professorships were at Villa I Tatti, Florence, and the Universities of Chicago, Harvard and Basel, and she serves on a number of editorial boards. In 2019 she shared the Guido Adler Prize of the International Music Association with fellow APS member Lewis Lockwoord, in honor of "scholars who have made an outstanding contribution to musicology." Apart from a critical edition of Rossini’s opera Il Turco in Italia, her publications range widely over English, French and Italian music of the 14th to 16th centuries, including editions (some joint) of John Dunstaple, Old Hall, English masses, and Johannes Ciconia. A facsimile and study of the 15th-century Veneto manuscript Bologna Q15: The Making and Remaking of a Musical Manuscript (LIM, Lucca, 2008) won the Claude Palisca prize of the AMS. Other books include: Counterpoint, Composition, and Musica Ficta (London and New York: Routledge, 2002); Fauvel Studies: Allegory, Chronicle, Music and Image in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS français 146, ed. Margaret Bent and Andrew Wathey (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998); Margaret Bent and Robert Klugseder, A Veneto Liber cantus (c. 1440): Fragments in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich, and the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna (Wiesbaden: Reichert, 2012). Full listing of publications can be accessed at http://www.all-souls.ox.ac.uk/people.php?personid=4 (classified by subject) and http://www.music.ox.ac.uk/index.php?id=844 (chronological). Known for revisionist and often controversial contributions in several areas of late-medieval music theory and practice, her work has overturned long-held suppositions about manuscript relationships and datings, meanings of notational signs, interpretations of medieval writings, and modern historiographical impositions (notably concepts of isorhythm, chromaticism, diminution). Starting points are nearly always manuscripts, notation, archives, texts, genres (especially motets). She addresses compositional and analytical techniques, counterpoint, musical grammar and rhetoric, the construing and complementing of notations, codicological and stemmatic issues. She has described (and sometimes discovered) manuscript fragments and reconstructed their music, and is currently documenting musical networks in the Veneto. She co-founded the Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music (http://www.diamm.ac.uk/), continues to lead early music seminars and singing sessions from original notation in facsimile in Oxford, and is a closet pianist, viol player and Wagnerian. Margaret Bent was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
3Name:  Dr. Andrew Delbanco
 Institution:  Teagle Foundation; Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia University. He was awarded the 2011 National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama "for his writing that spans the literature of Melville and Emerson to contemporary issues in higher education." In 2001, he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and named by Time Magazine as "America’s Best Social Critic." In 2003, he was named New York State Scholar of the Year by the New York Council for the Humanities. In 2006, he received the "Great Teacher Award" from the Society of Columbia Graduates. Professor Delbanco is the author of many books, including, recently, College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be (Princeton University Press, 2012), and The Abolitionist Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2012). Melville: His World and Work (2005) was published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf, in Britain under the Picador imprint, and has appeared in German and Spanish translation. Melville was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography, and appeared on "best books" lists in the Washington Post, Independent (London), Dallas Morning News, and TLS. It was awarded the Lionel Trilling Award by Columbia University. Other books include The Death of Satan (1995), Required Reading: Why Our American Classics Matter Now (1997), and The Real American Dream (1999), which were named notable books by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. The Puritan Ordeal (1989) also won the Lionel Trilling Award. He has edited Writing New England (2001), The Portable Abraham Lincoln (1992, 2009), volume two of The Sermons of Ralph Waldo Emerson (with Teresa Toulouse), and, with Alan Heimert, The Puritans in America (1985). His most recent book is The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for American's Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War (2018). Andrew Delbanco’s essays appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, New Republic, New York Times Magazine, and other journals, on topics ranging from. American literary and religious history to contemporary issues in higher education. Mr. Delbanco has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was a member of the inaugural class of fellows at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. He is a trustee of the Library of America and trustee emeritus of the National Humanities Center. He has served as Vice President of PEN American Center, and as a trustee of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. He became President of the Teagle Foundation in 2018. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
4Name:  Dr. Carlo Ginzburg
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles; Scuola Normale, Superiore, Pisa
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Carlo Ginzburg has taught at the University of Bologna, at UCLA, at the Scuola Normale of Pisa. His books, translated into more than twenty languages, include The Night Battles; The Cheese and the Worms; Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method; The Enigma of Piero della Francesca; History, Rhetoric, and Proof; The Judge and the Historian; Wooden Eyes; No Island is an Island; and Threads and Traces. He received the Aby Warburg Prize (1992), the Humboldt-Forschungs Prize (2007), the Balzan Prize for the History of Europe, 1400-1700 (2010).
 
5Name:  Dr. Lewis Lockwood
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1930
   
 
Lewis Lockwood is an American music historian. He has worked primarily in two fields: music and culture in Italy from c. 1400 to 1600; and the intensive study of Beethoven’s life and music. Lockwood was born in New York City in 1930 (by chance on Beethoven’s birthday), was trained as a cellist and continues to be active in chamber music. After attending the High School of Music and Art, then Queens College, he did his graduate studies at Princeton University with Oliver Strunk and others (Ph.D 1960). He taught at Princeton from 1958 to 1980, then moved to Harvard University, remaining there until his retirement in 2002. In 2010 he accepted appointment as Distinguished Senior Scholar in Musicology at Boston University. Having been swept into Renaissance studies in his undergraduate years by Edward Lowinsky, his first area of scholarship was Italian music history of the 15th and 16th centuries. His dissertation on the north Italian 16th-century composer Vincenzo Ruffo showed the influence of church patronage on style in sacred music. His later work included numerous articles on sacred and secular music, culminating in his major book, Music in Renaissance Ferrara, 1400-1505 (1984, rev. 2009) This book was the first fully documented study of the rise of this important musical center, and received the Howard Marraro Prize of the Society of Italian Historians in 1985. In 2008 Lockwood received the Paul Oskar Kristeller Award from the Renaissance Society of America, and he holds honorary degrees from the Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, New England Conservatory, and Wake Forest University. In 2019 he shared the Guido Adler Prize of the International Music Association with fellow APS member Margaret Bent, in honor of "scholars who have made an outstanding contribution to musicology." In the 1960's he turned towards the study of Beethoven, with a special focus on the vast patrimony of Beethoven’s surviving sketches and autograph manuscripts as evidence of his compositional process. Still only very partially known and published, these sources offer unparalleled insight into Beethoven’s methods of composition over his entire lifetime. Lockwood’s essay on the composing score of the cello sonata Op. 69 appeared in The Music Forum, 1970 and later in his Beethoven: Studies in the Creative Process (1992). In 2003 he brought out his Beethoven: The Music and the Life (New York: Norton). which has been translated into six language and was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in biography. This book gives primacy to Beethoven as composer while it also deals with the most salient issues in his life and career. In 2008, in collaboration with the members of the Juilliard String Quartet, he co-authored the book, Inside Beethoven’s Quartets. Most recently he has co-edited, with Alan Gosman, the critical edition of Beethoven’s "Eroica" Sketchbook (2013). He was the founding editor of Beethoven Forum, (1992-2007), the first serial scholarly publication on Beethoven produced in America. Lockwood was named by Joseph Kerman in the New York Review of Books as "a leading musical scholar of the postwar generation and the leading American scholar on Beethoven." Lewis Lockwood was elected a members of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
6Name:  Dr. Elaine Scarry
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Elaine Scarry is currently Harvard College Professor and the Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and General Theory of Value in the Department of English at Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1974, which she followed with a professorship at the University of Pennsylvania. Since the publication of The Body in Pain (1985), Elaine Scarry has held a special place in American literary, cultural, and political discourse. That book was widely discussed in many fields, and remains an important point of reference - all the more important since the "torture memos" of the U.S. Department of Justice began to come to light. In fact, the events of 9/11 made Dr. Scarry’s work all the more pertinent, and she has made many timely interventions in ensuing debates. Since moving from the University of Pennsylvania to Harvard, she has pursued work on aesthetics - beauty in relation to truth - and political responsibility (thinking in a situation of emergency) in ways that are unprecedented and impressive. Her work is read in many fields, including law. She won the Truman Capote Award in 1999 and is the author of several books, Literature and the Body: Essays on Populations and Persons (1990), Resisting Representation (1994), Dreaming by the Book (1999), On Beauty and Being Just (1999), Who Defended the Country? A New Democracy Forum on Authoritarian versus Democratic Approaches to National Defense on 9/11 (2003), Rule of Law, Misrule of Men (2010), Thinking in an Emergency (2011), and Thermonuclear Monarchy: Choosing Between Democracy and Doom (2013). Elaine Scarry was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
7Name:  Dr. Kay Kaufman Shelemay
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Kay Kaufman Shelemay is the G. Gordon Watts Professor of Music and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. An ethnomusicologist who received her Ph.D. in Musicology from the University of Michigan (1977), Shelemay has carried out ethnographic and historical research in Ethiopia and among a cross-section of musical communities in the United States. Shelemay’s first book, Music, Ritual, and Falasha History (1986), won both the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award in 1987 and the Prize of the International Musicological Society in 1988. Among her other books are A Song of Longing: An Ethiopian Journey (1991); Ethiopian Christian Chant: An Anthology (3 vols., 1993-97), co-authored with Peter Jeffery; Let Jasmine Rain Down: Song and Remembrance Among Syrian Jews (1998); and the textbook Soundscapes: Exploring Music in a Changing World (2nd ed., 2006, 3rd ed. forthcoming). Shelemay has also edited a seven-volume series of readings in ethnomusicology and other collections of essays, including Pain and Its Transformations: The Interface of Biology and Culture (2007, co-edited with Sarah Coakley) and Creating the Ethiopian Diaspora, a special double volume of Diaspora, A Journal of Transnational Studies (2011, co-edited with Steven Kaplan). Among her numerous articles, "The Power of Silent Voices. Women in the Syrian Jewish Musical Tradition" won the Society of Ethnomusicology’s 2010 Jaap Kunst for best article of the year. Shelemay has been awarded fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies. A Past-President of the Society for Ethnomusicology, Shelemay was a Congressional appointee to the Board of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress from 1999-2012. In 2000, she was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2004, a fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research. Shelemay was named the Chair for Modern Culture at the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress during 2007-2008, and served as the Phi Beta Kappa/Frank M. Updike Memorial Scholar during 2010-2011. Kay Kaufman Shelemay was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2013.
 
Election Year
2013[X]