American Philosophical Society
Member History

Results:  7 ItemsModify Search | New Search
Page: 1Reset Page
Residency
International (1)
Resident (6)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
1Name:  Dr. Ann M. Blair
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1961
   
 
Ann Blair is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor at Harvard University and a specialist of early modern European intellectual and cultural history. Her interests include the history of science, especially traditional natural philosophy and the relations between science and religion (e.g. in The Theater of Nature: Jean Bodin and Renaissance Science, Princeton University Press, 1997), and the history of education, the history of the book and of methods of working. Her articles include discussions of the methods of note-taking and of responses to overload in early modern Europe (e.g. in Critical Inquiry 2004, and the Journal of the History of Ideas 2003). In her forthcoming book with Yale University Press she examines the role and nature of Latin reference books 1450-1700, in light of earlier models and sources as well as the new resources and challenges that resulted from printing.
 
2Name:  Dr. Larissa Bonfante
 Institution:  New York University
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  August 23, 2019
   
 
Larissa Bonfante was Professor of Classics at New York University (1963-2006). Born in Italy, she came with her family to the United States as a child by way of Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. She held a BA from Barnard College, an M.A. in Classics from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in Art History and Archaeology from Columbia University, with Otto Brendel as dissertation adviser. Her first published article was "Emperor, God and Man: Julian the Apostate and Ammianus Marcellinus," followed by Etruscan Dress (1975). Further work on ancient dress, originally inspired by the works of Margarete Bieber, included an NEH Summer Seminar on the Symbolism of Roman Costume (1988), and publications on the Roman triumph, and nudity as a costume in classical art. Brendel’s statement, "we take the Greeks as our model, forgetting that they did everything differently from everyone else," helped direct her focus on the non-Greeks of the classical world, for example in The Etruscan Language, written with her father, the Indo-Europeanist Giuliano Bonfante. Bonfante was a member of the German Archaeological Institute, the Istituto di Studi Etruschi ed Italici, founder and President of its US Section, and co-editor of Etruscan News. She was Visiting Member of the Institute for Advanced Study in 1980, received teaching awards at New York University for her work with undergraduates, and the 2007 Gold Medal for Archaeological Achievement from the Archaeological Institute of America. She delivered the Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series in 2006-07 and the AIA Norton Lecturesship in 2007-08. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2009. Larissa Bonfante died August 23, 2019 in New York, New York at the age of 88.
 
3Name:  Dr. Richard C. M. Janko
 Institution:  University of Michigan
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Richard Janko is the current Else Collegiate Professor of Classical Studies and former Chair of the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, having previously taught at Columbia University and University College, London. He has added new insights and dimensions to our understanding of structure and chronology of archaic Greek literature though his pioneering work in applying computer techniques and through his superb and wide-ranging knowledge of Greek language and culture. He is the author of many works, including: Homer, Hesiod and the Hymns: Diachronic Development in Epic Diction, 1982; Aristotle on Comedy: Towards a Reconstruction of Poetics II, 1984; Aristotle: Poetics, 1987; The Iliad, A Commentary, books 13-16, 1992; Philodemus: The Aesthetic Works, Volume I: On Poems, 2000. Janko was awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award from the UCLA Students' Union in 1992, the Premio Theodor Mommsen in 2002, and the Goodwin Award from the American Philological Association in 2002 and he is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2006) and of the American Philological Association.
 
4Name:  Dr. Anthony A. Long
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
I was born August 17, 1937 in Manchester, England, where my parents were secondary school teachers. As a high-school student, I was introduced to Plato by my school's charismatic principal. That experience was the primary reason I decided to study Classics as an undergraduate. After two years of military service I entered University College London where I had the good fortune to be taught by some of Britains's most outstanding scholars of Greek and Latin. I graduated BA in 1960, and was immediately appointed Lecturer in Classics, specializing in ancient philosophy, at the University of Otago, NZ. While teaching at Otago, I completed a PhD for the University of London with a dissertation on abstract nouns in Sophocles. This was the basis for my first book, Language and Thought in Sophocles (1968). In 1964 I left Otago in order to return permanently to Britain, where I held appointments, first at the University of Nottingham, then at University College London, and finally as Gladstone Professor of Greek at the University of Liverpool (1973-83). During these years I made several visits to the USA, most significantly in 1978-9, when I held fellowships consecutively at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. Princeton gave me my first experience of teaching graduate seminars, which I found so rewarding that I decided I would move permanently to the USA if I were offered a suitable position. That opportunity soon emerged at the University of California at Berkeley, where I have been Professor of Classics since 1983 and Irving Stone Professor of Literature since 1991, with occasional absences as visiting professor or fellowship holder in Germany, France, and Holland. Although my first book was on Sophocles, my first article (1963) was a study of Parmenides, and it is ancient philosophy that has been the primary focus of my research. That has always included the early Greek philosophers on whom I edited a volume in the Cambridge Companion series (1999), but in 1967 I began a series of studies of the Hellenistic philosophers, especially Stoics, and these thinkers have remained the principal focus of my research ever since. When I began this work, Hellenistic philosophy was very much a minority pursuit, but it has now definitely become main stream. My first attempt to publicize it was a general study, Hellenistic Philosophy. Stoics, Sceptics, Epicureans (first edition 1974), which has been translated into seven languages. In collaboration with David Sedley (Lawrence Professor of Ancient Philosophy at the University of Cambridge), Cambridge University Press commissioned me to publish a two-volume source book of the principal texts of the Hellenistic Philosophers with philosophical commentary (1987). This work has been translated into French and German. Since then, I have continued to work on many Hellenistic philosophical topics and Roman thinkers, including Cicero, Seneca and Epictetus on whom I published Epictetus. A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life (2002). At the same time, I have been working extensively on ancient models of mind and selfhood, with reference to all periods of ancient philosophy, and also on conceptual connexions between theology and rationality. I hope in due course to complete two further books on these topics.
 
5Name:  Dr. Franco Moretti
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Franco Moretti, the current Danily & Laura Louise Bell Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Stanford University founded the Center for the Study of the Novel at Stanford, a center that has been energetic, lively and imaginative in its promotion of critical discussion of the novel. He has written many culturally significant books, including: Signs Taken for Wonders, 1983; The Way of the World: The Bildungsroman in European Culture, 1987; Modern Epic: The World-System from Goethe to García Márquez, 1995; An Atlas of the European Novel, 1998; Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for a Literary History, 2005. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2006.
 
6Name:  Dr. Robert B. Pippin
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Robert B. Pippin is the current Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought and the Chair of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago, having previously taught at the University of California, San Diego. Arguably more than anyone else in the Anglo-American philosophical world, Robert Pippin is responsible for the very considerable rise of interest in Hegel's thought that has taken place since the publication of his pathbreaking book Hegel's Idealism (1989). For Pippin, Hegel is not simply one of the great figures of the philosophical past; rather, from the first he has found in Hegel an exemplary thinker for the present age, one whose writings have first to be understood in the context of problems inherited from Kant and his immediate successors, but which then can be seen to bear closely on problems in the philosophy of mind, art, action and Continental and English-language traditions. More recently, Pippin has ranged widely across the 19th and 20th centuries, with magisterial essays on figures such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Blumenberg, Gadamer and Strauss, as well as a highly original book on the novelist Henry James. He is currently putting the final editorial touches to a book-length study of Hegel's theory of agency. He was the 2001 winner of the Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award. As mentioned, he has authored a number of books, including: Kant’s Theory of Form: An Essay on the Critique of Pure Reason, 1982; Modernism as a Philosophical Problem: On the Dissatisfactions of European High Culture, 1991; Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations, 1997; Henry James and Modern Moral Life, 2000; The Persistence of Subjectivity: On the Kantian Aftermath, 2005; Hegel's Practical Philosophy: Rational Agency as Ethical Life, 2008. He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 2007.
 
7Name:  Professor Daniel Roche
 Institution:  Collège de France
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Daniel Roche is a Professor at the Collège de France. In his career as teacher and scholar, Daniel Roche has been one of the greatest forces in the renewal of historical studies over the last thirty years. As a specialist on urban societies, his work has focused upon three lines of inquiry: understanding the link between urban milieu and both scholarly and popular forms of culture; analyzing the birth of societies of consumption taking both material and intellectual culture as their starting point; and, finally, demonstrating mobility in traditional societies. His many works include (titles translated from French): The Century of the Enlightenment in the Provinces: Provincial Academies and Academicians, 1689-1789, 1978; The People of Paris: Essay on Popular Culture in the Eighteenth Century, 1981; Diary of My Life: Critical Edition of the Diary of Jacques-Louis Ménétra, an Eighteenth-century Master Glazier, 1982; Paris under the Old Régime, 1983; French People and the Old Régime, I. Society and State, II. Culture and Society, 1984; French Republicans of Letters: Persons of Culture and Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century, 1988; The Culture of Appearances: Essay on the History of Clothing in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, 1989; France of the Enlightenment, 1993; A History of Ordinary Things: Birth of the Society of Consumption, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, 1997; Paris Almanac for Foreigners, 2001; Wandering Moods: the History of Voyages and the Journeyings of Peoples, 2003. He is a member of Academia Europea (1989) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1998).
 
Election Year
2009[X]