American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
1Name:  Dr. Ronald Dworkin
 Institution:  New York University; University College, Oxford
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  407. Philosophy
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1931
 Death Date:  February 14, 2013
   
 
Ronald Dworkin was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at New York University and Professor of Jurisprudence at University College, Oxford. He received his L.L.B. from Harvard Law School in 1957 and went on to clerk for Judge Learned Hand. He taught at Yale University Law School from 1962-69, serving as Holhfeld Professor of Law, and from 1969-98 was Professor of Jurisprudence at Oxford University and Fellow of University College. In 1994 he was awarded the American Philosophical Society's Henry M. Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence in recognition of "his book Law's Empire and his other jurisprudential writings over the past quarter century." His 2007 award of the Holberg Prize confirmed more widely what Dworkin's professional colleagues have come to take for granted: that there is no more influential thinker now at work in the fields radiating from the intersections of moral philosophy, political philosophy, and the philosophy of law. With the publication of Rawls' Theory of Justice, moral philosophy was brought back to the center of philosophical study, and Dworkin has expanded its reach both by essentially linking the interpretation of law with the perspective of morality, and by his unique position as a public intellectual. The position is unique in demonstrating in practice one of Dworkin's guiding ideas, namely that freedom of speech is fundamental to that responsibility for civic conversation apart from which society cannot know itself, that is, know what it values politically. Ronald Dworkin's publications include Taking Rights Seriously (1977); A Matter of Principle (1985); Law's Empire (1986); Philosophical Issues in Senile Dementia (1987); A Bill of Rights for Britain (1990); Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia and Individual Freedom (1993); Freedom's Law: The Moral Reading of the American Constitution (1996); Sovereign Virtue: The Theory and Practice of Equality (2000); and Is Democracy Possible Here? Principles for a New Political Debate (2006). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1979). Ronald Dworkin was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008. He died on February 14, 2013, at the age of 81 in London.
 
2Name:  Dr. Philip Gossett
 Institution:  University of Chicago; University of Rome
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1941
 Death Date:  June 13, 2017
   
 
Philip Gossett was the Robert W. Reneker Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Music and in the College at The University of Chicago, where he has been on the faculty since 1968. From 1989 to 1999 he was Dean of the Division of the Humanities. He had taught at the Universities of Paris, Parma, and Rome; in 1989 he delivered the Gauss Seminars at Princeton University in 1991, and in 2001 was the Hambro Visiting Professor of Opera Studies at Oxford University. In 2002-2003 he was a Visiting Scholar for Phi Beta Kappa and gave a series of seminars at the Beinecke Library of Yale University. In 2004 he had also become a Professor at the Università "La Sapienza" of Rome. Gossett was general editor of The Works of Giuseppe Verdi (published by The University of Chicago Press and G. Ricordi-Universal Music of Milan) and of Works of Gioachino Rossini (published by Bärenreiter Verlag, Kassel). He served on many editorial boards, including the critical editions of the works of Gaetano Donizetti, Vincenzo Bellini, Gilbert & Sullivan, and Kurt Weill, as well as several periodicals. He published widely in the area of Italian opera. His books include "Anna Bolena" and the Maturity of Gaetano Donizetti (Oxford, 1985) and Divas and Scholars: Performing Italian Opera (The University of Chicago Press, 2006). The latter won the Kinkeldey award of the American Musicological Society in 2007 as the best book in music of the previous year and the Laing Prize of The University of Chicago Pressin 2008 for the recent book by a member of the University's faculty that brought the most "distinction" to the Press's list. The Accademia di Santa Cecilia, Rome, has published his studies of the autograph manuscripts of Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia (1993) and Donizetti's Don Pasquale (1999), together with facsimiles of these manuscripts. His scholarly articles have appeared in many journals and collections of essays. His 1971 translation of the Treatise on Harmony by Jean-Philippe Rameau continues to be used by music theorists. He also published essays on the compositional process of Beethoven and on music aesthetics. His notes are featured in opera programs in America and Europe and in many CDs. His essays have appeared in The New York Review of Books and The New Republic. Gossett worked closely with opera companies in the performance of operas based on the critical editions he supervised, including the Metropolitan Opera of New York, the Santa Fe Opera, Chicago Lyric Opera, New York City Opera, the Teatro alla Scala of Milan, and Finnish National Opera. He served as the 'Consulente musicologica' for the Verdi Festival in Parma in 2000-2001 and played a similar role at the Rossini Opera Festival of Pesaro from 1980 through 2000. He also worked individually with numerous singers, suggesting repertory, writing embellishments, etc., including Cecilia Bartoli, Rockwell Blake, Renée Fleming, Cecilia Gasdia, Jennifer Larmore, Samuel Ramey, and Vivica Genaux. His edition of Verdi's La forza del destino, in collaboration with the late William Holmes, had its first performances in November 2005 at San Francisco Opera (1869 version) and at the Stadttheater of Bern in April 2006 (1862 version). Gossett earned his B.A., summa cum laude, from Amherst College in 1963 and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1970. He held fellowships from the Fulbright program, the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, the Martha Baird Rockefeller Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and received a Doctor of Humane Letters from Amherst College in 1993. He served as Vice President (1986-88), then President (1994-96) of the American Musicological Society, and President (1993-95) of the Society for Textual Scholarship. He was three times President of the Jury of the Premio Borciani competition for young String Quartets (1997, 2002, 2008). He was on the Board of Directors of the International Musicological Society and of Il Saggiatore Musicale. Among his other awards and honors are the Alfred Einstein award of the American Musicological Society (1969), the Quantrell award of The University of Chicago for excellence in undergraduate teaching (1974), the Medaglia d'Oro, prima classe, of the Italian Government (1985), the Deems Taylor Award of ASCAP (1986 and 2007), and the Order of Rio Branca of the Republic of Brazil (1998). He was an honorary member of the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna (1992), a socio straniero of the Ateneo Veneto (2001) and the Royal Swedish Academy of Music (2008), and an Accademico onorario of the Accademia di Santa Cecilia, Rome (2003). For his contributions to Italian culture, the Italian government named him a Grand Ufficiale dell'Ordine al Merito in 1997; in 1998 the President of Italy personally decorated him with the Cavaliere di Gran Croce, Italy's highest civilian honor. In 2004 he was granted a "Distinguished Achievement Award" by the Mellon Foundation, the first musicologist to be so honored. Philip Gossett was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008. He died June 13, 2017, at age 75, in Chicago, Illinois.
 
3Name:  Dr. Christiane Klapisch-Zuber
 Institution:  École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Christiane Klapisch-Zuber is the former Director of Studies at the Centre de Recherches Historiques, l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. She has been a pioneer in the study of family history and genealogy, with special reference to the lives of young girls, women, and artisans. Her groundbreaking study of the Florentine tax records of 1429, coauthored with David Herlihy, changed the course of the economic and social history of the family in early modern Italy, and was based on unprecedented statistical analysis. In subsequent research she investigated such original topics as family ritual in relation to naming, the phenomenon of the family tree as an image and scheme, the history of adoption, and the imaginary power of ancestors. Klapisch-Zuber has approached the history of "the petit peuple" of late medieval and early modern France and especially Italy from both micro- and macro- historical viewpoints. More recently she has turned her attention to the lineage of Florentine magnates and their relationship to the popolani in the fourteenth century. Her generosity as a scholar is legendary, as is her capacity to construct new historical narratives through extraordinary mining of the archives. Widely influential in several fields, Klapisch-Zuber is a truly international figure who has changed the course of historical research, and her many brilliant essays are widely translated in anthologies. Christiane Klapisch-Zuber was elected an international member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008. In 2016 she was awarded the Middle Ages Prince Provins.
 
4Name:  Dr. Joseph Leo Koerner
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and raised there and in Vienna, Joseph Leo Koerner studied at Yale University (B.A. 1980), Cambridge University (M.A. 1982), University of Heidelberg (1982-3), and University of California at Berkeley (M.A. 1985, Ph.D. 1988). After three years at the Society of Fellows, Harvard University (1986-9), he joined the Harvard faculty, where he was Professor of History of Art and Architecture until 1999. 1999-2000 he was Professor of Modern Art History at the University of Frankfurt; in 2000 he moved to London, where he was Professor first at University College London (until 2004), then at the Courtauld Institute of Art (until 2007). Koerner organized teaching exhibitions at Harvard on Early Netherlandish Painting (1990), German Renaissance Art (1993), Pieter Bruegel (1995) and Netherlandish prints 1550-1675 (1999). At the Austrian National Gallery in 1997, he curated a retrospective of the work of his father, the painter Henry Koerner. In 2002, he collaborated with Bruno Latour and others on the exhibition Iconoclash: Beyond the Image Wars at the Center for Art and Media in Karlsruhe. His books include Die Suche nach dem Labyrinth--Der Mythos von Daedalus und Ikarus (1983), Caspar David Friedrich and the Subject of Landscape (1990), The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (1993), and The Reformation of the Image (2004). Koerner wrote and presented the three-part series Northern Renaissance for BBC Television. He also wrote and presented the BBC feature-length documentary Vienna: City of Dreams. Koerner was awarded the Jan Mitchell Prize for the History of Art in 1992. He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1995. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008. In 2009 he was award a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Society of Fellows.
 
5Name:  Dr. Joyce Marcus
 Institution:  University of Michigan
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Joyce Marcus is Robert L. Carneiro Distinguished University Professor and Curator of Latin American Archaeology at the University of Michigan. A major figure in American archaeology, she is a prolific scholar who has made key contributions to understandings of the ancient civilizations of the Zapotecs (Mexico), the Maya (Mexico and Central America), and the Incas and their predecessors (Peru). With great theoretical sophistication, she has advanced archaeological knowledge on such key topics as pre-Columbian urban and political development in Mexico, the evolution of Zapotec civilization in Oaxaca over two millennia, and the nature of ancient Mesoamerican writing systems. Her writings are widely read and cited and are highly influential in the field. Dr. Marcus's publications include Emblem and State in the Classic Maya Lowlands: An Epigraphic Approach to Territorial Organization (1976); Mesoamerican Writing Systems: Propaganda, Myth, and History in Four Ancient Civilizations (1992); and (with K. Flannery) Zapotec Civilization: How Urban Society Evolved in Mexico's Oaxaca Valley (1996). She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974 and has served on the University of Michigan faculty since 1976. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1997) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1997). Joyce Marcus was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
6Name:  Dr. Francesca Rochberg
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Francesca Rochberg is Catherine and William L. Magistretti Distinguished Professor of Near Eastern Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies and the Office for the History of Science and Technology, and a member of the Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her B.A. in Oriental Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, where she also worked on the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary. At the age of 30 she received a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship. In 1987 she joined the faculty of the University of Notre Dame in the Department of History and the Program in History and Philosophy of Science. Her research focuses on ancient Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman traditions in the celestial sciences and their interrelation with religion. She has produced first editions of cuneiform texts and has published widely on Babylonian celestial sciences, setting the cuneiform material in various contexts, from cultural to cognitive history. She has introduced the evidence of ancient cuneiform science into the philosophy of science through investigations of empiricism, prediction, logic and reasoning. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Visiting Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, and a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. She won the John Frederick Lewis Award from the American Philosophical Society in 1999 for her monograph Babylonian Horoscopes. Francesca Rochberg was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
7Name:  Dr. Michael Silverstein
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2008
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1945
 Death Date:  July 17, 2020
   
 
Michael Silverstein (Ph.D., Harvard University, 1972) was Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, of Linguistics, and of Psychology, and was in the Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, at the University of Chicago. He studied language structure and its functional contextualization, language history and prehistory, the anthropology of language use, sociolinguistics, semiotics, language and cognition (and their development), and history of linguistic and ethnographic studies. His fieldwork in northwestern North America and northwestern Australia has been the basis of various descriptive, theoretical and generalizing contributions. He was also investigating language use and textuality as sites of contestation and transformation of cultural value in contemporary American society, reconceptualizing sociocultural and rhetorical practices in light of the semiotic anthropology of communication. Michael Silverstein was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2008.
 
Election Year
2008[X]