American Philosophical Society
Member History

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1Name:  Dr. Lina Bolzoni
 Institution:  Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Lina Bolzoni is professor of Italian literature at the University of Pisa and the Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa. She has served on the University of Pisa faculty since 1976 and chaired the Department of Italian Literature from 1989-91 and 1995-97. She has also held visiting professorships at the Collège de France and Harvard, New York and Princeton Universities. She received her Ph.D. from the Scuola Normale Superiore in 1974. Lina Bolzoni has pioneered the study of relationships between literature and philosophy, literature and the figurative arts, and between memory and preaching for our generation. She has made the study of sacred and secular oratory her special province and has explored the relationship between the art of memory and figurative practice in both art and literature. She has been a generous colleague at the Scuola Normale and an innovative supporter of electronic scholarship, even exploring relationships between medieval systems of memory and modern neurological patterns of memory and modes of perception. Her approach to the study of literature is innovative and disciplined, expanding the canon in imaginative ways. Dr. Bolzoni's published works include L'universo dei poemi possibili. Studi su Francesco Patrizi da Cherso, 1980; Il teatro della memoria. Studi su Giulio Camillo, 1984; The Gallery of Memory. Literary and Iconographic Models in the Age of Printing, 1995; The Web of Images. Vernacular Preaching from its Origins to St. Bernardino da Siena, 2002; and Poesia e ritratto nel Rinascimento, 2008. She has been honored with the Premio Viareggio per la saggistica, 2002; the Premio Brancati Zafferana Etnea per la saggistica, 2002; and the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jean Scaglione Prize, 2003. Lina Bolzoni is also a member of the Accademia La Colombaria, Firenze. She was elected an international member of the American Philosophical Society in 2007.
 
2Name:  Dr. Tyler Burge
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Tyler Burge is one of the leading contemporary figures in philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and epistemology. His work centers on the essential embeddedness of the individual subject in the social world of which he is a member, and the logical inseparability of ascriptions to an individual of thought, meaning, and knowledge from the objective facts of this social context - even when the individual is not fully aware of those facts. This is not just the evident empirical point that individuals acquire their concepts by social learning. It is a claim about the content of those concepts, and its logical dependence on the world around them and on other speakers of their language. This "anti-individualist" approach casts a new light on the way in which the mind is part of the world. It goes against a venerable tradition extending from Descartes through Frege. As Burge observes, it has some affinities with the tradition of Hegel. His work is also related to that of Hilary Putnam and Donald Davidson. He has explored the implications of these ideas not only for mental content but for meaning, for the objectivity of norms, and for self-knowledge - which is much more puzzling when the boundaries between the self and the world are complicated in this way. These writings are widely cited and very influential. He also has done serious work in the history of philosophy, notably on Frege and Kant. Dr. Burge is presently Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Los Angeles.
 
3Name:  Dr. Judith Butler
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Grounded in Continental philosophy, Judith Butler has become one of the most influential voices in the fields of feminist theory, literary criticism, social theory, ethics, and psychoanalysis. Her best-known book, Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, became a founding text for theoretical work in gender and sexuality through its critical readings of Simone de Beauvoir, Julia Kristeva, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Luce Irigaray. Perhaps the book's most significant choice was the use of J. L. Austin's concept of performativity as the basis for an understanding of the development of a gendered subjectivity not dependent on biological givens. Performativity becomes an increasingly powerful and flexible conceptual tool in Butler's subsequent, nuanced work on iterability and citation. Responding to postmodern and post-structuralist critiques of the self-evidence of identity, Dr. Butler has emerged as a public intellectual through her rigorous exploration of non-foundationalist approaches to issues of rights and representation. Over the past decade, her work has increasingly moved outward from gender and sexuality (while not letting go of its emphasis on those issues) to encompass broader questions of human rights, social theory, and ethics. Her more recent books explore hate speech, the politics of kinship, the problematics of universalism, and the efficacy and limitations of self-knowledge in the context of inequality. Those publications include Antigone's Claim: Kinship Between Life and Death (2000); (with E. Laclau, S. Zizek) Hegemony, Contingency, Universality (2000); Precarious Life: Powers of Violence and Mourning (2004); and Giving an Account of Oneself (2005). Judith Butler was awarded the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award for exemplary contributions to scholarship in the humanities in 2008. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2019). She has been Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric, Comparative Literature, and Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Berkeley since 1993. She holds a Ph.D. from Yale University and has also served on the faculties of Wesleyan and Johns Hopkins Universities. Judith Butler was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2007.
 
4Name:  Dr. Timothy J. Clark
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
T. J. Clark was born in Bristol, England in 1943, took a B.A. in modern history at Cambridge, and a Ph.D. in art history at the Courtauld Institute, University of London. He has taught at a number of institutions in England and the U.S., including the Universities of Leeds and Essex, Camberwell School of Art, UCLA, Harvard, and, since 1988, the University of California, Berkeley, where he is George C. and Helen N. Pardee Chair and Professor of Modern Art. He is the author of a series of books on the social character and formal dynamics of modern art, including The Absolute Bourgeois: Artists and Politics in France 1848-1851 (1973); Image of the People: Gustave Courbet and the 1848 Revolution (1973); The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers (1984); and Farewell to an Idea: Episodes from a History of Modernism (1999). In Spring 2005 Verso published a polemical analysis of the present crisis in world politics written by him jointly with Iain Boal, Joseph Matthews, and Michael Watts (a.k.a. "Retort"), entitled Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War. Clark's latest book is The Sight of Death: An Experiment in Art Writing (2006), an extended study of two paintings by Nicolas Poussin, Landscape with a Calm in the Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and Landscape with a Man Killed by a Snake in the National Gallery, London.
 
5Name:  Professor Cora Diamond
 Institution:  University of Virginia
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Cora Diamond is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Philosophy Emerita and Professor of Law Emerita at the University of Virginia. One of the most original and influential recent interpreters of both early (Tractatus-era) and late (Investigations-era) Wittgenstein, her work has inspired a whole new school (the "New Wittgenstein"), but she is also much more than that. Her essays range widely over issues in the philosophy of language, ethics, and literature and they illuminate everything that they touch. She is simultaneously a humanistic and an analytic philosopher, and her work has wide range and great power.
 
6Name:  Dr. Stephen J. Greenblatt
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. His areas of specialization include Shakespeare, 16th and 17th century English literature, the literature of travel and exploration, and literary theory. Dr. Greenblatt's publications include the following books: Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare; Hamlet in Purgatory; Practicing New Historicism; Marvelous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World; Learning to Curse: Essays in Modern Culture; Shakespearean Negotiations: The Circulation of Social Energy in Renaissance England; Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare; Sir Walter Raleigh: The Renaissance Man and His Roles; Three Modern Satirists: Waugh, Orwell, and Huxley; The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve; Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics; and The Swerve: How the World Became Modern - for which he won both the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction and the National Book Award. In 2012 he edited and annotated new editions of Thomas Browne's Urne-Buriall and Religio Medici with his wife Ramie Targoff. In addition he is the General Editor of The Norton Shakespeare and the General Editor of The Norton Anthology of English Literature. He is also (with Charles Mee) the author of a play, Cardenio. He serves on the editorial or advisory boards of numerous journals and is an editor and cofounder of Representations. His research has been supported by fellowships and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim, Fulbright, Howard and Kyoto University Foundations, and the American Council of Learned Societies. He has received the James Russell Lowell Prize of the MLA, the British Council Prize in the Humanities, and the Mellon Distinguished Humanist Award. He is an Honorary Corresponding Fellow of The English Association, U.K. For Will in the World he received the 2004 Will Award from The Shakespeare Theatre, Washington, DC, and the 2005 Independent Publisher Book Award for Biography; the book was a finalist for the National Book Awards, the Pulitzer Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Awards, the National Book Critic Circle Awards, the Quills, and the Julia Ward Howe Prize of the Boston Author's Club. Dr. Greenblatt has been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Letters, is a permanent fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin, and has served as president of the Modern Language Association of America. He has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley, lectured widely and held numerous visiting professorships. His named lecture series include the Lionel Trilling Seminar at Columbia, the Theo Crosby Memorial Lecture, Globe Theatre, London, the Clarendon Lectures at Oxford, the Carpenter Lecturers at the University of Chicago, and the University Lectures at Princeton. He received his B.A. (summa cum laude) from Yale University, a second B.A. from Cambridge University, and his Ph.D. from Yale. He was born in Boston and has three sons. In 2016 he was awarded the Holberg Prize by the government of Norway.
 
7Name:  Dr. Victor H. Mair
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania; Hangzhou University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Victor H. Mair, Professor of Chinese Language and Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1976. He also holds an M.Phil. degree from the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London). He has been teaching at the University of Pennsylvania since 1979. Professor Mair specializes in Buddhist popular literature as well as the vernacular tradition of Chinese fiction and the performing arts. Among his chief works in these fields are Tun-huang Popular Narratives (1983), Painting and Performance: Chinese Picture Recitation and Its Indian Genesis (1988), and T'ang Transformation Texts: A Study of the Buddhist Contribution to the Rise of Vernacular Fiction and Drama in China (1989). He is also the author, editor, or translator of numerous other books and articles on Chinese language, literature, and culture. Throughout the 1990s, Professor Mair organized an interdisciplinary research project on the Bronze Age and Iron Age mummies of Eastern Central Asia. Among other results of his efforts during this period were three documentaries for television (Scientific American, NOVA, and Discovery channel), a major international conference, numerous articles, and The Tarim Mummies: Ancient China and the Mystery of the Earliest Peoples from the West (2000, with J.P. Mallory). Professor Mair is the founder and editor of Sino-Platonic Papers, General Editor of the ABC Chinese Dictionary Series at the University of Hawaii Press, and series editor for Encounters with Asia at the University of Pennsylvania Press. He has been a fellow or visiting professor at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (2004, 2008), the University of Hong Kong (2002-2003), the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton, 1998-1999), the Institute for Research in Humanities (Kyoto University, 1995), Duke University (1993-1994), and the National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 1991-1992).
 
8Name:  Dr. Jane Dammen McAuliffe
 Institution:  Library of Congress; Bryn Mawr College
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
In 2015, Jane McAuliffe was appointed the inaugural Director of National and International Outreach, a newly created division of the Library of Congress. She retired in October 2019. Prior to that, she served as the Director of The John W. Kluge Center, the residential research center for scholars at the Library of Congress. She is President Emeritus of Bryn Mawr College. She had served as the President from 2008 to 2013. Her primary areas of specialization are the Qur'an and its interpretive tradition, the early history of Islam and the many modalities of Muslim-Christian interaction. For the last decade she has published the six volumes of the Encyclopaedia of the Qur'an, an international scholarly project which has resulted in the first multi-volume reference work on the Qur'an in Western languages. Other publications include Qur'anic Christians: An Analysis of Classical and Modern Exegesis (1991), Abbasid Authority Affirmed: The Early Years of al-Mansur (1995), With Reverence for the Word: Medieval Scriptural Exegesis in Judaism, Christianity and Islam (2002) and The Cambridge Companion to the Qur'an (2006). Dr. McAuliffe is currently the Islam editor for the Norton Anthology of World Religions, co-edits a book series for Brill Publishers and serves on the editorial boards of a number of scholarly journals. For two decades she has been involved in many forms of Muslim-Christian dialogue, both nationally and internationally. Most recently this has involved work with the Vatican, Lambeth Palace, the Library of Congress and the Royal Jordanian Institute for Interfaith Studies. Dr. McAuliffe's research has been supported by fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Connaught Foundation and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations. Before being named president of Bryn Mawr College in 2008, Dr. McAuliffe was Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies and Professor of History at Georgetown University. She is currently a distinguished fellow of Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs. She previously held faculty and administrative positions at Emory University and at the University of Toronto. In 2004, she served as president of the American Academy of Religion, the elected leadership position for this 10,000 member professional organization. Dr. McAuliffe is married to Dr. Dennis McAuliffe, a scholar of medieval Italian literature at Georgetown University. They are the parents of four children.
 
9Name:  Dr. Gülrü Necipoglu
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Gülrü Necipoglu has been Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Harvard University since 1993. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard in 1986. Professor Necipoglu is the author of Architecture, Ceremonial and Power: The Topkapi Palace (1991); The Topkapi Scroll, Geometry and Ornament in Islamic Architecture (1995); and The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire (2005). She is also the editor of Muqarnas: An Annual on Islamic Art and Architecture and Supplements to Muqarnas. Her Topkapi Scroll won the Albert Hourani Book Award and the Spiro Kostoff Book Award. The Age of Sinan has been awarded the Fuat Koprulu Book Prize. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the International Palladio Center for the Study of Architecture in Vicenza.
 
10Name:  Dr. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is University Professor at Columbia University. A founder of postcolonialism, an important subdiscipline in literary and cultural studies, she translated Jacques Derrida's Of Grammatology, which introduced Derrida to the English speaking world. Her early essay, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" has had world-wide influence, as have her other books and essays. She has been visiting professor, or held fellowships, or has given lectures all over the world. Her books and essays have been translated into many languages. A distinguished scholar in an adjacent field has said of Professor Spivak that "her influence on Third World feminism, Continental feminist theory, Marxist theory, subaltern studies and the philosophy of alterity is unparalleled by any living scholar; she has changed the academic terrain of each of these fields by her acute and brilliant contributions; her critical interrogation of the political status quo in its global dimensions has reached tens of thousands of activists and scholars." She was awarded the 2012 Kyoto Prize of the Inamori Foundation for Arts and Philosophy (Thought and Ethics), the 2013 Padma Bhushan from the Government of India, and the 2017 Lifetime Scholarly Achievement from the Modern Language Association of America.
 
11Name:  Professor Peter Stallybrass
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Peter Stallybrass is Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. For the last thirteen years, he has directed the seminar on the History of Material Texts, and he co-edits the Material Texts series for the University of Pennsylvania Press. While training as a mortician in England after leaving school, he started to read obsessively the novels of Dostoevsky and, with the mistaken impression that one would have more time to read at university, applied to the University of Sussex. Peter was an undergraduate, a graduate, and finally a lecturer at Sussex, where he directed the graduate program in Renaissance Studies and the faculty/graduate seminar in Critical Theory. In 1984, he was a co-founder of the Popular Literature Group at the Centre for Social History in Oxford, organizing conferences on Romance and on Detective Fiction. In 1978, he visited the United States for the first time to teach for a year at Smith College, where he met his wife, Ann Rosalind Jones, Esther Cloudman Dunn Professor of Comparative Literature. After eight years of commuting across the Atlantic, he moved to Dartmouth College in 1986 and, in 1988, to the University of Pennsylvania, with visiting positions at King's College, University of London, and at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He has received fellowships from the American Council for Learned Societies, the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and he has been the Mellon Fellow at the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Moses Aaron Dropsie Fellow at the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies,. He has also served as Samuel Wannamaker Fellow at the Globe Theatre in London. In 1999, he was chair of the English Institute at Harvard University, and he has been a Trustee of the Institute since 2002. At Penn, he has been awarded both the Ira Abrams Award and the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. Most of Peter's early work was on literary and cultural theory, and he published The Politics and Poetics of Transgression, co-written with Allon White, in 1986. His continuing interest in this field has led to a book on Marx, materiality, and memory, published in Brazil in 1999 under the title O Casaco de Marx: Roupas, Memória, Dor. His interest in material culture took a new turn after the death of Allon White and the particular problems of disposing of his friend's clothes. As a memorial lecture for Allon, he wrote "Worn Worlds: Clothes, Mourning, and the Life of Things," which led him to a collaboration with Ann Rosalind Jones on Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory, published by Cambridge University Press and awarded the James Russell Lowell prize by the MLA in 2001. In 1994, Peter founded the seminar on the History of Material Texts at the University of Pennsylvania, which has been meeting weekly ever since, and has brought together academics, librarians, writers, artists, and anyone interested in books and other cultural technologies. Peter's interest in the history of books began after reading Magreta de Grazia's Shakespeare Verbatim, and, drawing upon many of the ideas in her book, he wrote with her The Materiality of the Shakespearean Text (Shakespeare Quarterly 1993). He also began to teach a graduate class that met in and drew upon the wealth of Philadelphia's libraries, including the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Rosenbach Library, and the Free Library, in addition to the University's libraries. Since Roger Chartier was appointed to the History Department at Penn in 2000, he and Peter have been teaching an undergraduate seminar on Reading, Writing, and Printing. Teaching Hamlet, they discovered the material basis of Hamlet's erasable "tables of the mind" in the Folger Shakespeare Library and, together with Frank Mowery (the Folger's Head of Conservation) and Heather Wolfe (the Folger's Curator of Manuscripts), wrote "Hamlet's Tables and the Technologies of Writing in Renaissance England" (Shakespeare Quarterly 2004). Peter's work at the Library Company of Philadelphia led him to collaborate with Jim Green, the Librarian, to curate exhibitions on Material Texts and on Benjamin Franklin (for which Jim and he wrote Benjamin Franklin, Writer and Printer, co-published by Oak Knoll, the Library Company and the British Library in 2006). In 2006, he also co-curated with Heather Wolfe and Michael Mendle an exhibition on Technologies of Writing at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. The same year, Peter gave the A. S. W. Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography at the University of Pennsylvania on Printing for Manuscript, which will be published in 2008.
 
12Name:  Dr. Frank H. Stewart
 Institution:  The Hebrew University
 Year Elected:  2007
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
By discipline an anthropologist, Frank Stewart is a creative and rigorous thinker in Middle Eastern studies. He was Professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University 1994 to 2009. Stewart's two volumes of texts on Sinai Bedouin law are the first installments of an exceptionally deep study of a customary (non-Shari'a) legal system that is unlikely to last much longer, and they are also a significant contribution to Arabic linguistics. No other researcher has been able to study a legal system based on unwritten law in such depth. In addition to his core work on the Middle East, he has also written on the historical anthropology of North American Indians, on age-group systems across the world (also of interest to some economists), and on the concept of honor (also of interest to philosophers - the book was reviewed in Mind). The article on Schuld and Haftung is a contribution to comparative law published in the leading journal of German legal history.
 
Election Year
2007[X]