American Philosophical Society
Member History

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4. Humanities[X]
1Name:  Dr. Paul Alpers
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley; Smith College
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402. Criticism: Arts and Letters
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  May 19, 2013
   
 
Paul Alpers was a distinguished literary historian and classicist, a master of the English, European and classical traditions, and an academic of the first rank. In his first book, The Poetry of the Faerie Queene, he showed himself to be "a learned and sensitive reader of Elizabethan poetry." He developed an original reading of Spenser's rhetorical modes, to which he returned in an important series of articles on narration. He next, as an extension of his work on Spenser, began to study the pastoral traditions. This resulted in an analysis and translation of Virgil's Eclogues and then What is Pastoral?, winner of the Christian Gauss Award. As Dr. Alpers traces the evolution of pastoral poetry from Theocritus and Virgil, through its great incarnations in the Renaissance, to its flowerings in modern literature, he has written what is arguably the definitive study of the subject, a work of exhaustive scholarship and literary intelligence. Dr. Alpers taught at the University of California, Berkeley beginning in 1961 and became Class of 1942 Professor of English Emeritus in 2000. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2004. Paul Alpers died May 19, 2013, at the age of 80 in Northampton, Massachusetts.
 
2Name:  Dr. John W. Baldwin
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  February 8, 2015
   
 
John Baldwin was a leading American specialist on the history of medieval France. Like Charles Homer Haskins, he had worked on the institutional and intellectual history of the twelfth century. His early works on the "just price" and the schoolman Peter the Chanter opened new vistas of research on economic growth and the culture of power. His book on the government of Philip Augustus won major prizes in America and France. The recipient of major honors in France and the United States, Dr. Baldwin was a generous colleague, a venerated teacher, and a distinguished medievalist in the mode of C. H. Haskins and J. R. Strayer. He had been at Johns Hopkins University since 1986 as Charles Homer Haskins Professor of History and Professor of History Emeritus. He was awarded the Medieval Academy's Haskins Medal in 1990 and the Chevalier de l'Ordre National de la Légion d'Honneur, France in 2001. He was a member of the Medieval Academy of America (president, 1996-97); the British Academy; and l'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2004.
 
3Name:  Dr. Nancy D. Cartwright
 Institution:  University of California, San Diego; Durham University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Nancy Cartwright is one of the most distinguished philosophers of science currently active in the English-speaking world. There is a unifying theme that runs through the five books and many of the articles she has published. This theme concerns the inevitable nature of the approximations and of the limitations of what we can hope, even in principle, to accomplish in science. These ideas are developed not in terms of grand generalities but by detailed consideration of many examples from a great variety of disciplines, especially economics and physics. Her focus is also often on the significance of the positive results we can expect. She is best known for her extensive publications on the nature of causality and scientific laws. Dr. Cartwright has served as Professor of Philosophy at the London School of Economics and Political Science since 1991 and as Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, San Diego since 1998. She left LSE and joined the Philosophy Department at Durham University in autumn 2012, to set up a new Centre broadly concerned with "Knowledge, Culture and the Public Good". In addition to working at Durham University, she is Distinguished Professor at University of California, San Diego. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1971.
 
4Name:  Dr. Regna Darnell
 Institution:  University of Western Ontario
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Regna Darnell is today the leading historian of North American linguistics and anthropology, from its founding by pioneers like Daniel Brinton and Franz Boas, to Edward Sapir and the modern field of ethnographic linguistics. She is one of Canada's most widely published authorities on First Nations languages and cultures, having conducted fieldwork across the continent with speakers of Algonkian, Athabascan, and Iroquoian languages. Her work represents a unique synthesis of hardminded ethnographic and linguistic description with the sensitivity of the humanistic tradition, bridging the gap between a postmodernist appreciation of cultural uniqueness and a scientific insistence on verifiable observation. Dr. Darnell holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania (1969) and has taught anthropology at the University of Alberta (1969-90) and the University of Western Ontario (1990-), where she is currently Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology. Her publications include Edward Sapir: Linguist, Anthropologist, Humanist (1990); Along Came Boas: Continuity and Revolution in Americanist Anthropology (1998); and Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology (2001). She won the 2020 Lifetime Service Award from the Women’s Caucus, Canadian Anthropology Society and the 2020 Lifetime Service Award from the American Society for Ethnohistory. She published History of Anthropology: A Critical Window on the Discipline in North America (2021), she will publish Method and Theory in the History of Anthropology (2022), and she edited the forthcoming Franz Boas Papers: Documentary Edition.
 
5Name:  Dr. Caroline Humphrey
 Institution:  University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Caroline Humphrey is, clear and away, the foremost Western social anthropologist working on the Soviet Union/Russia, said no less an authority than fellow APS member Clifford Geertz, who reviewed Humphrey's classic work on the social and cultural complexities of a Siberian collective for the New Republic. Her wide-ranging scholarship of Asian populations and Mongol shamanism have further consolidated her position as the pre-eminent social anthropologist in her field. She is particularly known for her work on nomadic life in East Asia, its decline and the changing status of women in those societies; Russia's new criminal class; as well as her long interest in the Jain society, an ancient, ritualistic, non-Brahminical East Indian sect. Dr. Humphrey's fluency in Russian and Mongolian and her understanding of Tibetan, Hindi and Napali have further assisted her penetrating studies. Equally remarkable are her communication skills among scholars and the public, whether by lectures or through widely-acclaimed documentary films. Dr. Humphrey is a Fellow of King's College and has served as Sigrid Rausing Professor of Collaborative Anthropology at Cambridge since 2006. She has won the Staley Prize in Anthropology (1990), the Royal Anthropological Institute's Rivers Memorial Medal (1999) and the Heldt Prize (2002) and is the author of Karl Marx Collective: Economy, Society and Religion in Siberian Collective Farm (1983); Shamans and Elders: Experience, Knowledge and Power among the Daur Mongols (1996); and (with D. Sneath) The End of Nomadism? Society, State and the Environment in Inner Asia (1999).
 
6Name:  Mr. Saul A. Kripke
 Institution:  The Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Saul Kripke is professor of philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and McCosh Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Princeton University. He earned a B.A. from Harvard University in 1962 and was a Harvard Junior Fellow from 1963-67 before becoming professor of philosophy at Rockefeller University. He joined the Princeton faculty in 1976. Saul Kripke's work has significantly changed the way we look at fundamental philosophical problems today. His 1972 lectures at Princeton University, published as Naming and Necessity (1980), shattered a centuries-old consensus on the nature of the fundamental semantical concepts of connotation and reference, as well as challenging received ideas about necessity and contingency. On the technical side, Kripke transformed the subjects of modal and intuitionistic logic. He has also made fundamental contributions to set theory and generalized recursion theory, and to Boolean Algebra. Subsequently he proposed the first new formal theory of truth since Alfred Tarski's epochal work in the 1930s. He also proposed a radically new interpretation of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations, one which continues to be at the center of virtually every discussion of that famous work. Kripke delivered Oxford University's John Locke Lectures in 1973-74 and was awarded the Swedish Academy of Sciences' Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 2001. Saul Kripke was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2004. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Nebraska, Omaha (1977), Johns Hopkins University (1997) the University of Haifa (1998) and the University of Pennsylvania (2005).
 
7Name:  Dr. Fedwa Malti-Douglas
 Institution:  Indiana University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Fedwa Malti-Douglas served as the Martha C. Kraft Chair of Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Gender Studies and Comparative Literature and Adjunct Professor of Law in the School of Law at Indiana University. In January 2013 she became College Professor Emeritus at Indiana University. A former Chercheur at the CNRS in Paris, she was a faculty member at the Salzburg Seminar in Salzburg, Austria, a Resident Fellow at the Bellagio Study and Conference Center, and a Senior Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University. She was selected by the Cornell College of Arts and Sciences as the James H. Becker Annual Distinguished Alumna. In addition, Dr. Malti-Douglas has delivered many annual, name, and endowed lectures, been the recipient of numerous grants, and served on various boards (including editorial boards) and visiting committees. After winning the 1997 Kuwait Prize for Arts and Letters, Dr. Malti-Douglas went on to receive the 1998 Distinguished Scholar Award from the Office for Women's Affairs as well as the 2000 Distinguished Faculty Research Lecture Award at Indiana University (both university wide). The Indiana University Student Association had already named her an Outstanding Teacher in 1993-94. The author of nine scholarly books and coauthor of three more, she has also published over ninety articles (as well as being editor of coeditor of four volumes). Her book Men, Women, and God(s) was chosen as A Centennial Book by the University of California Press (1995) and her The Starr Report Disrobed (2000) was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Dr. Malti-Douglas has also published a novel, Hisland (1998, 1999), an academic satire featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education, where Marjorie Perloff called it "one of the funniest academic novels in recent years." Prof. Malti-Douglas has been a guest on radio and television programs. She served as Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender (4 volumes, 2006). She was awarded the 2014 National Humanities Medal and the 2015 Indiana University President's Medal.
 
8Name:  Dr. J. Hillis Miller
 Institution:  University of California, Irvine
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402. Criticism: Arts and Letters
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1928
 Death Date:  February 9, 2021
   
 
J. Hillis Miller taught for many years at the Johns Hopkins University and then at Yale University before moving in 1986 to the University of California, Irvine, where he was UCI Distinguished Research Professor of English and Comparative Literature Emeritus. He was the author of many books and essays on nineteenth and twentieth-century English, European, and American literature, and on literary theory. His most recent books are Others (2001), Speech Acts in Literature (2002), On Literature (2002), and Zero Plus One (2003). His recent work includes a book on speech acts in the novels and stories of Henry James. A J. Hillis Miller Reader has also recently appeared from Edinburgh University Press and Stanford University Press. He died on February 9, 2021.
 
9Name:  Dr. Linda Nochlin
 Institution:  Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1931
 Death Date:  October 29, 2017
   
 
One of the most important and influential art historians of the later twentieth century, Linda Nochlin was a pioneer in the feminist approach to art history. Functioning both as a scholar and as a role model for younger art historians, Dr. Nochlin conducted important research in the field of late nineteenth and early twentieth century French art. Her writings on Courbet are essential to the bibliography on this important painter, and in a series of important essays she explored with erudition and great eloquence questions of the relationship between art and power, particularly in the areas of politics and gender. Deeply versed in theoretical approaches to the field, Dr. Nochlin's work is informed by a profound humanity and generosity of spirit, qualities which have made her an inspiring teacher and mentor to many students and younger scholars. She was the Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Dr. Nochlin has also taught at Yale University (1990-92), Vassar College (1963-80) and the City University of New York (1980-90). She is the author of books including Realism (1972); Gustave Courbet: A Study of Style and Society (1976); Art and Architecture in the Service of Politics (1978); Courbet Reconsidered (1988); Women, Art, Power & Other Essays (1988); and The Politics of Vision (1990). Linda Nochlin died October 29, 2017, at the age of 86 in Manhattan.
 
10Name:  Dr. Ronald G. Witt
 Institution:  Duke University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1932
 Death Date:  March 15, 2017
   
 
Ronald Witt was a distinguished scholar of Renaissance humanism with an extensive publication record. His book In the Footsteps of the Ancients is considered the most important book on the medieval origins of Renaissance humanism in the past fifty years, and it has gained widespread international recognition as a ground-breaking contribution to the early history of the humanist movement in Italy. He is a recipient of the American Philosophical Society's Jacques Barzun Prize in Cultural History and of the American Historical Society's Marraro Prize, given for the best book in Italian studies. His election as vice president (with automatic succession to the office of president) of the Renaissance Society of America was further testimony to his leadership in the field of Renaissance studies. At the time of his death on March 15, 2017, at age 84, he was William B. Hamilton Professor of History Emeritus at Duke University, where he had taught since 1971, Dr. Witt received his Ph.D. from Harvard University (1965). He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2004.
 
11Name:  Dr. Michael Wood
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
As the list of his publications suggests, Michael Wood is a critic of astonishing range, working with literature in several languages and from several periods. He has also written screenplays. His books have been enthusiastically reviewed, and many of them have won more than academic readership. He writes and speaks with perspicacity, wit and penetration, and he concerns himself with large issues (the importance of literature; the social and moral meanings of film; the need for knowledge of diverse cultures) as well as small ones (the texture of prose, the function of an image). Also brilliantly successful as a teacher and administrator, Dr. Wood has been the Charles Barnwell Straut Professor of English at Princeton University since 1995. Born in England, he holds a Ph.D. from Cambridge University (1961) and has also taught at Columbia and Exeter Universities. A member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the Royal Society of Literature, he has authored many books, including Stendhal (1971); America in the Movies, or "Santa Maria, It had Slipped My Mind" (1989); Gabriel Garcia Marquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude (1990); The Magician's Doubts: Nabokov and the Risks of Fiction (1995); Children of Silence: On Contemporary Fiction (1998); and The Road to Delphi: The Life and Afterlife of Oracles (2003).
 
12Name:  Dr. Ying-shih Yu
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1930
 Death Date:  August 1, 2021
   
 
An influential teacher and prolific author, Ying-shih Yu has long earned international recognition as the pre-eminent scholar of Chinese history. The breadth of his research, ranging from views of life and death in first and second-century China, through intellectual history and political culture of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, to eighteenth through twentieth-century Chinese intellectual history, is staggering. In his work he combines close and subtle scrutiny of fresh source materials to broad generalization about main themes in Chinese history and culture. His research on a merchant ethos in Chinese society from the sixteenth through the nineteenth century, for example, has been influential in articulating the belief in a Confucian work ethic in modern East Asian countries. In May 2001 a group of his former students gathered in Princeton for an unusually stimulating two-day conference on topics ranging over more than two thousand years of Chinese history. Born in China in 1930, Dr. Yu received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1962 and served as assistant professor there from 1969-77 before moving to Yale University as Charles Seymour Professor of History. In 1987 he joined the faculty of Princeton University as Professor of Chinese Studies and History and became Gordon Wu '58 Professor of Chinese Studies Emeritus in 2001. Dr. Yu's many written works include Views of Life and Death in Late Han China (1962); Trade and Expansion in Han China: A Study in the Structure of Sino-Barbarian Economic Relations (1967); Fang I-chih wan chieh k'ao (The Death of Fang I-chih), 1611-1671 (1972); "Intellectual Breakthroughs in the Tang-Sung Tradition"; "'O Soul, Come Back!' A Study in the Changing Conceptions of the Soul and Afterlife in Pre-Buddhist China"; Intellectual History in Late Imperial China: Modern Interpretations (1984); Shih yu Chung-kuo wen-hua (History of Chinese Culture) (1987); and The Radicalization of China in the Twentieth Century. With fellow APS member John Hope Franklin, Dr.Yu shared the 2006 John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanity. He was elected a member of the Academia Sinica, Taiwan in 1974 and of the American Philosophical Society in 2004. He died on August 1, 2021 in Princeton, NJ.
 
Election Year
2004[X]