American Philosophical Society
Member History

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International (2)
Resident (6)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
1Name:  Dr. Teodolinda Barolini
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Teodolinda Barolini is one of the leading Dante scholars of our time, perhaps best known for her book The Undivine 'Comedy': Detheologizing Dante, which moves beyond Dante's own determination of the reader's experience to search for the poet's real narrative techniques. She was awarded the Howard R. Marraro Prize of the Modern Language Assosication and the John Nicholas Brown Prize of the Medieval Academy of America for her book Dante's Poets: Textuality and Truth in the 'Comedy'. She also has a wide range of interests in Medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, particularly poetry, and she is currently preparing a commentary to Dante's lyrics for the Biblioteca Universale Rizzoli. Teodolinda Barolini received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1978 and served as assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley until 1983 when she moved to New York University. In 1992, she joined the faculty of Columbia University, where she is currently the Lorenzo Da Ponte Professor of Italian. From 1992-2004 she led Columbia's Italian Department as chair and director of graduate studies, while at the same time serving as president of the Dante Society of America from 1997-2003. In 1996 she received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia. Dr. Barolini is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
2Name:  Dr. Victoria Reifler Bricker
 Institution:  Tulane University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Victoria R. Bricker received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1968. She joined the faculty of Tulane University in 1969 and became professor emerita of anthropology in 2006. Dr. Bricker's brilliant research has focused on the cultural and linguistic structure of the Maya, ancient and contemporary, with path-breaking studies of three domains: the forms of ritual humor found in modern Mayan cultures (1973); comparative analysis of Mayan insurrections against Spanish rule during the colonial and modern periods (1981); and the grammar of Mayan hieroglyphs (1986). More recently, she has focused her research on the hieroglyphs and iconography found in the Mayan codices - painted bark-cloth books - (1992), and she is now universally recognized as a preeminent world authority in this scholarly field. Dr. Bricker has been the series editor of the Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians since 1977. She was an editor for American Ethnologist (1973-76) and book review editor of the American Anthropologist (1971-73). She is the author of Ritual Humor in Highland Chiapas (1973); The Indian Christ, the Indian King: The Historical Substrate of Maya Myth and Ritual (1981); A Grammar of Maya Hieroglyphs (1986); Papers on the Madrid Codex (1997); A Dictionary of the Mayan Language as Spoken in Hocaba, Yucatan (1988); (with H. Bricker) "Zodiacal References in the Maya Codices," in The Sky in Mayan Literature (1992); "Color and texture in the Maya language of Yucatan," Anthropological Linguistics (1999), (with Helga Maria Miram) "An Encounter of Two Worlds: The Book of Chilam Balam of Kaua (2002), and (with Harvey Bricker) Astronomy in the Maya Codices (2011). Victoria and Harvey Bricker are the 2011 recipients of the American Philosophical Society's John Frederick Lewis Award for Astronomy in the Maya Codices. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Anthropological Association, serving on its executive board from 1980-83. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
3Name:  Professor Paolo Galluzzi
 Institution:  Istituto e Museo Nazionale di Storia della Scienza, Florence; University of Florence
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Paolo Galluzzi is a prominent figure in the scientific and cultural life of Italy and a well known collaborator on international projects. He is a teacher-scholar, the author of several books on the science and technology of the Renaissance and other aspects of the history of science in Italy and the creator of widely acclaimed exhibitions that unite period machines with beautifully reconstructed working models. He is a master at designing and using information technology for instruction and research; a member of several commissions to conserve Italy's cultural heritage; and a tireless innovator of ways to interest high-school students and their parents in the history and culture of science and technology. Paolo Galluzzi has directed the Istituto e Museo Nazionale di Storia della Scienza, Florence since 1982 and has been Professor of the History of Science at the University of Florence since 1994.
 
4Name:  Dr. Paul F. Grendler
 Institution:  University of Toronto
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Paul Grendler received a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin in 1964. In 1965 he went to the University of Toronto as an assistant professor and remained there throughout his career. He became professor emeritus in 1998. He is the author of Critics of the Italian World, 1530-1560, 1977; The Roman Inquisition and the Venetian Press, 1540-1605, 1977; Culture and Censorship in Late Renaissance Italy and France, 1981; Schooling in Renaissance Italy, 1989; Books and Schools in the Italian Renaissance, 1995; The Universities of the Italian Renaissance, 2002; Renaissance Education Between Religion and Politics, 2006; and The European Renaissance in American Life, 2006. He was Editor in Chief of The Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, 6 volumes, in 1999, and The Renaissance, an Encyclopedia for Students, 4 volumes, in 2004. He was articles editor for Renaissance Quarterly from 2000 to 2003. Paul Grendler is one of the most distinguished American scholars studying the Italian Renaissance. He is as recognized and esteemed in Italy as in North America. His book on Venice and the Inquisition was a pioneering study that has become a classic. His masterpiece, however, is his Schooling in Renaissance Italy, which after all these centuries finally told us what went on in those schools from which secondary education in the Western world was derived. His book on the universities of the Italian Renaissance is the first comprehensive study in any language of all Italian universities between 1400 and 1600 while The European Renaissance in American Life examines how Americans re-create the Renaissance or portray it in fiction and film. His books have won prizes from the American Historical Association, the American Catholic Historical Association, the American Library Association, and the Sixteenth Centuries Studies Conference. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Italian Historical Studies in 1998, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Renaissance Society of America in 2017, and the George E. Ganss, S.J., Award in 2018. Dr. Grendler was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1978-79 and has received many other fellowships. Dr. Grendler was president of the American Catholic Historical Association in 1984, the Renaissance Society of America from 1992 to 1994, and the Society for Italian Historical Studies from 2003 to 2005. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
5Name:  Dr. Joseph Kerman
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404. History of the Arts, Literature, Religion and Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  March 17, 2014
   
 
Joseph Kerman was a central figure in American musicology during the discipline's ascendancy in the second half of the twentieth century. He was a student of Oliver Strunk at Princeton; major influences were D.F. Tovey, William Arrowsmith, and E.T. Cone. After joining the University of California, Berkeley in 1951, he worked to consolidate its leading position in musicological studies. In 1972-74 he held the Heather Professorship of Music at Oxford and in 1987-88 delivered the Charles Eliot North Lectures at Harvard (published as Concerto Conversations). A self-described "critic and musicologist", he always addressed general readers as well as specialists; his first book, Opera as Drama, reached a broad readership. He wrote for general readers in Hudson Review (1948-62) and New York Review (1970-). He also urged that criticism should assume a role within "official" musicology; the hasty evolution of the discipline in the 1980s was spurred both by his polemical book Contemplating Music and his editorship of the innovative journal 19th Century Music. He wrote on a variety of topics in classical music up to the twentieth century, with specialties in Elizabethan music and the music of Beethoven (books: The Elizabethan Madrigal and The Masses and Motets of William Byrd; Beethoven, with Alan Tyson, and The Beethoven Quartets). Other books are The Art of Fugue, a critical edition of Beethoven's "Kafka" sketchbook, the long-running textbook Listen, and the essay collections Write All These Down and Opera and the Morbidity of Music. Joseph Kerman died March 17, 2014, at the age of 89 in Berkeley, California. He had been elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
6Name:  Dr. John Lukacs
 Institution:  Chestnut Hill College
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1924
 Death Date:  May 6, 2019
   
 
John Lukacs was one of the master interpreters of the modern era, that is, of Western Civilization since 1500. His knowledge of politics and society in Europe and America was unrivalled for breadth and suffused with philosophic imagination. He at home in the wide survey (The Passing of the Modern Age), the local study (Philadelphia: Patricians & Philistines), and the cultural inquiry (Historical Consciousness), these being three of his distinctive contributions. He could conjure before us a city (Budapest: 1900) or the conflict of titans (The Duel: Churchill and Hitler, May-July 1940). By their conception and execution every one of Dr. Lukacs's works fills a gap in our intelligence of the world we live in. Born in Hungary, Dr. Lukacs was a graduate of Palatine Joseph University, Budapest (Ph.D., 1946). For over fifty years he served on the faculty of Chesnut Hill College, becoming Professor Emeritus after 1994. He remained at work into the latest year of his life, publishing his final book, "We at the Center of the Universe," in 2017. John Lukacs died on May 6, 2019 in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania at the age of 95.
 
7Name:  Professor Erika Simon
 Institution:  University of Würzburg
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1927
 Death Date:  February 15, 2019
   
 
Erika Simon was born in Ludwigshafen (then in the suburb Rheingönheim), and from 1930 she lived in Aschaffenburg/Main (not far from Frankfurt) where she attended high school. Then from 1947 on she was a student at Heidelberg University and Munich University. From 1953-59 she was an assistant at Mainz University, and from 1959-63 she was a Docent at Heidelberg University. She had a visiting position from 1961-62 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. From 1964-94 she was Professor of Classical Archaeology at Würzburg University and Director of the Antiquities in Martin-von-Wagner Museum. She has been professor emerita since 1994. Dr. Simon is the author of Die Götter der Griechen (1969); Das antike Theater (1972); Pergamon und Hesiod (1975); Festivals of Attica, An Archaeological Commentary (1983); Die konstantinischen Deckengemälde in Trier (1986); Die Götter der Römer (1990); and Ausgewahlte Schriften I/II (1998). She is a member of the German Archaeological Institute and has honorary doctorates at Athens and Thessaloniki Universities.
 
8Name:  Dr. Christoph Wolff
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Christoph Wolff received a Dr.Phil. at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen, in 1966, where he was an instructor at the Institute for Sacred Music (1963-65) and a lecturer in the Department of Music (1965-69). Later he served as an assistant professor of music at the University of Toronto and as professor of music at Columbia University before moving to Harvard University in 1976. He is currently the Adams University Professor at Harvard. Christoph Wolff is one of the foremost musicologists of our time, and without peer as a scholar of Johann Sebastian Bach. In addition to his work as editor and archivist, in 2000 he published a widely-praised biography of Bach aimed at a general audience, now in its fourth printing and translated into eight languages. His amazing discovery in 1999 of a trove of Bach family manuscripts in Kiev drew international attention. He has served widely on professional bodies and has also been a successful academic administrator at Harvard, where for eight years he was Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. His list of books include The Bach Family (principal author, 1983); Bach: Essays on His Life and Music (1991); Mozarts Requiem: Historical and Analytical Studies-Documents-Score (1994); and Johann Sebastian Bach: The Learned Musician (2000). Dr. Wolff is the recipient of the Dent Medal of the Royal Musical Association, London (1978) and an Honorary Professor of the University of Freiburg since 1990. He currently serves on the board of directors of the the Packard Humanities Institute and chairs the executive board of the Bach Archive in Leipzig, Germany. Dr. Wolff is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the Saxon Academy of Sciences at Leipzig. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
Election Year
2002[X]