American Philosophical Society
Member History

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502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions[X]
1Name:  Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella
 Institution:  Supreme Court of Canada
 Year Elected:  2018
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Justice Rosalie Abella, born in a displaced persons’ camp to survivors of Theresienstadt and Buchenwald and brought to Canada as a young child, has been honored around the world as a leading voice for human rights among judges of the world’s high courts. Abella is an expert on human rights law and has taught at McGill Law School. She has authored several books and over 75 articles. She was called to the Ontario bar in 1972 and appointed to the Canadian Supreme Court in 2004. Her 14 years on the Canadian Supreme Court have been distinguished for the clarity and wisdom of her opinions. At an earlier phase of her career, her work on equal employment opportunity established an analytical framework that the Canadian Supreme Court and courts around the world have adopted. In the past she has been a member of the Human Rights Commission of Ontario, of the Ontario Public Service Labour Relations Tribunal, and was the first woman chair of the Ontario Labour Relations Board. Rosalie Silberman Abella was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2018.
 
2Name:  The Honorable Shirley S. Abrahamson
 Institution:  Supreme Court of the State of Wisconsin
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1933
 Death Date:  December 19, 2020
   
 
Shirley S. Abrahamson was the Chief Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. She was initially appointed to that body by Governor Patrick Lucey in 1976 and was subsequently elected in 1979, 1989 and 1999. She became the Chief Justice on August 1, 1996 and is the first woman to serve as either Justice or as Chief Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Born and raised in New York City, Chief Justice Abrahamson received a bachelor's degree from New York University in 1953, a law degree from Indiana University Law School in 1956 and a doctor of law in American legal history in 1962 from the University of Wisconsin Law School. She is the recipient of 15 honorary doctor of laws degrees and the Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining the court, Chief Justice Abrahamson practiced law in Madison, Wisconsin and taught at the University of Wisconsin Law School. She is the past president of the National Conference of Chief Justices and past chair of the board of directors of the National Center for State Courts. She also served as chair of the National Institute of Justice's National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence. She was a member of the Council of the American Law Institute and the board of directors of New York University School of Law Institute of Judicial Administration. She died on December 19, 2020.
 
3Name:  Ms. Jill Abramson
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
 
Jill Abramson has been a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at Harvard University since 2014. She was the executive editor of The New York Times from September 2011 to May 2014. Previously she was managing editor of the paper from August 2003 until August 2011. As managing editor, Ms. Abramson helped supervise coverage of two wars, four national elections, hurricanes and oil spills. She also wrote about politics, in the Week in Review and Book Review sections. She served as Washington bureau chief from December 2000 until July 2003. She joined the newspaper in September 1997 and became Washington editor in 1999. Previously, Ms. Abramson worked at The Wall Street Journal from 1988 to 1997. While there, she served as deputy bureau chief in its Washington, D.C., bureau and investigative reporter, covering money and politics. Ms. Abramson is the author of Merchants of Truth, published in 2019. She is also the co-author of Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas, published in 1994, and Where They Are Now: The Story of the Women of Harvard Law 1974, published in 1986. Strange Justice, a non-fiction finalist for the National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award in 1994, details the circumstances surrounding the confirmation hearings of Justice Clarence Thomas. Where They Are Now is a study of the 71 women in the Harvard Law School class of 1974. Ms. Abramson won the National Press Club award for national correspondence in 1992 for political coverage of money and politics.in 2018 she was appointed Adjunct Professor at Dublin City University's School of Communications. Ms. Abramson is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She serves on the Journalism Advisory Board of ProPublica, an independent, non-profit newsroom that produces investigative journalism in the public interest. She also serves on the board of visitors of Columbia University's School of Journalism. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2012.
 
4Name:  The Honorable Arlin M. Adams
 Institution:  Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis
 Year Elected:  1979
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1921
 Death Date:  December 22, 2015
   
 
Arlin M. Adams was a Court of Appeals Judge, having served from 1969 to 1987. He was of counsel at one of Philadelphia's largest law firms, Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis, where he spent a significant amount of time on issues of public interest. Judge Adams earned his undergraduate degree from Temple University. He received his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, serving as Editor-in-Chief of Penn Law Review. Later, he served on the school's faculty. Prior to his appointment to the Federal bench by President Richard M. Nixon, Judge Adams had a long history of public service, including a term as Secretary of Public Welfare of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from 1963 to 1966. He was also the author of books and many articles on law and religion, including (with C. Emmerich and W. Burger) Nation Dedicated to Religious Liberty: The Constitutional Heritage of the Religious Clauses (1990) and (with W. Miller and M. Marty) Religion and the Public Good: A Bicentennial Forum (1989). Judge Adams was President of the American Judicature Society and chairman of the U.S. Supreme Court Fellows. In 1997 he received the Philadelphia Award, the highest award for civic service in the Delaware Valley. In addition to his having received numerous honorary degrees, the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Drexel University created professorships in his name in 2005 and 2007, respectively, and in 2001, Susquehanna University named a law center in his honor. Judge Adams served as trustee for numerous boards, including the University of Pennsylvania, Bryn Mawr College, Einstein Medical Center, the Philadelphia Diagnostic Center, and the National Constitution Center. Arlin Adams was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1979 and served as its President from 1993 to 1999. He died December 22, 2015, at the age of 94 in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania.
 
5Name:  Mr. David Adjaye
 Institution:  Adjaye Associates
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1966
   
 
Adjaye Associates was established in June 2000 by founder and principal architect, David Adjaye OBE. Receiving ever-increasing worldwide attention, the practice's largest commission is the design of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Further projects range in scale from private houses, exhibitions and temporary pavilions to major arts centres, civic buildings and masterplans in Europe, North America, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Renowned for an eclectic material and color palette and a capacity to unfold cinematically, the buildings differ in form and style, yet are unified by their ability to challenge typologies and to generate a dynamic cultural discourse.
 
6Name:  Mr. S. James Anaya
 Institution:  University of Colorado Law School, Boulder
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
 
S. James Anaya is currently Dean and Charles Inglis Thomson Professor at the University of Colorado Law School. He earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1983. Prior to coming to the University of Colorado, he worked with the National Indian Youth Council, at the University of Iowa College of Law, as Special Rapporteur for Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations, and the University of Arizona Regents’ and James J. Lenoir Professor of Human Rights Law and Policy at the James E. Rogers College of Law of the University of Arizona. James Anaya teaches, writes, and litigates in the areas of international human rights, constitutional law, and the rights of indigenous peoples. He occupies a unique position in international indigenous rights and at the United Nations, and is internationally acknowledged as an articulate spokesperson. In 2014, he completed two terms as the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Prior to working at the U.N., he helped indigenous peoples win groundbreaking cases before the Organization of American States and he produced important and innovative scholarship on indigenous international rights. He helped shape and influence the development of international law. As the Rapporteur, he reported on the conditions of indigenous peoples worldwide and responded to allegations of human rights violations. His work included visiting affected countries and writing official reports, and direct contacts with governments and indigenous peoples. He also helped draft the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Among his awards are: the Haywood Burns / Shanara Gilbert Award of the Northeast People of Color Conference (2009); the Bernard S. Rodey Award of the University of New Mexico Alumni Association (2014); and the Goler T. Butcher Award of the American Society of International Law (2016). He is the author of: Indigenous Peoples in International Law, 1996; International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples, 2009; (with H. Hannum, D. Shelton) International Human Rights: Problems of Law, Policy and Practice, 2011. James Anaya was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
7Name:  Ms. Natalie Marie Angier
 Institution:  The New York Times
 Year Elected:  2005
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Fascinated by science since her youth and endowed with a unique facility for words, Natalie Marie Angier writes with a lucidity and enthusiasm that have identified her as a most gifted and respected science writer. A science correspondent for The New York Times since 1990, she has also written for Discover and Time magazines and worked in journalism education, most recently as a visiting professor at Cornell University. Ms. Angier has a captivating way of seducing her readers into understanding complex scientific concepts without sacrificing the truth. Her first book, Natural Obsessions, disseminated an accurate understanding of the profound significance of the oncogene concept to scientists and nonscientists alike and earned her a Pulitzer Prize. Her writing is visual and kinetic, colorful and festive, while at the same time playful and full of surprises. Each scientific story reads like an exciting novel, difficult to put down. But she combines this skill in storytelling with an originality of thinking, and the unusual capacity for synthesizing seemingly unrelated facts into original perspectives. In the essays collected in The Beauty of the Beastly, she finds poetry in the "seamy" side of nature: in parasites; in animal deceit and brutality. In Woman: An Intimate Geography, she breaks out from stereotypic views of women. In the L.A. Times, it was described as "…a classic - a text so necessary and abundant and true that all efforts of its kind, for decades before and after, will be measured by it." Ms. Angier's latest book is entitled The Canon: A Whirligig Tour Through the Beautiful Basics of Science, which "sparkles with wit and charm" and "refines everything you've ever wanted to know about science into an entertaining and accessible guide."
 
8Name:  The Honorable Robert Badinter
 Institution:  Paris University I, Pantheon Sorbonne; French Council
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1928
   
 
Robert Badinter is the President of the OSCE Court of Conciliation and Arbitration, a Senator in the Senate of France, and a Professor of Law Emeritus at the Paris University I, Panthéon Sorbonne. He has served as the President of the Arbitration Commission for the Former Yugoslavia, a member of the Brussels Convention for the European Constitution, and a member of the United Nations High Level Panel. Robert Badinter has dedicated his long career to a more human justice and fundamental freedoms. As Minister of Justice, he was the author of the bill of abolition of the death penalty in France in 1981. He has been active in the creation of the international tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in the Hague and the International Criminal Court. He is the author of many books, including: The Execution, 1973; Libertés, Libertés, 1975; (with E. Badinter) Condorcet: An Intellectual in Politics, 1988; Free and Equals: The Emancipation of the Jews (1789-1791), 1989; Another Justice, 1990; The Penitentiary System of the Republic, 1992; The Republican Prison (1873-1914), 1993; Ordinary Antisemitism: Vichy and the Jewish Lawyers, 1997; The Abolition, 2000; A European Constitution, 2002; The Greatest Good, 2004; Against Death Penalty, 2006. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2006.
 
9Name:  The Honorable Michael Boudin
 Institution:  U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Since 1992, Michael Boudin has been a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston, serving as chief judge from 2001 to 2008. After graduating from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, where he served as President of the Harvard Law Review, he clerked for Judge Henry Friendly and then for Justice John Harlan. He practiced law, first as associate and then as partner, at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C (1965-87); held office as deputy assistant attorney general in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice (1987-90); and served on the federal district court in Washington, D.C. (1990-92). Since 1982, he has generally taught antitrust law and other subjects part time at Harvard Law School and, in one semester, at University of Pennsylvania Law School. For many years, he served as a member of the Council of the American Law Institute, taking emeritus status at the end of 2009. He is also the author of sundry law journals articles and book reviews.
 
10Name:  The Honorable Stephen Breyer
 Institution:  United States Supreme Court
 Year Elected:  2004
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1938
   
 
Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice, was born in San Francisco on August 15, 1938. He married Joanna Hare in 1967. They have three children, Chloe, Nell and Michael. He is a graduate of Stanford University, Oxford University (Magdalen College), and Harvard Law School. During the United States Supreme Court's 1964 term he was a law clerk to Justice Arthur J. Goldberg. From 1965-67 he worked as a special assistant to the head of the Justice Department's Antitrust Division. From 1967-80 he taught at Harvard University, as professor of law and at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. He also worked as an Assistant Watergate Special Prosecutor (1973), as a Special Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee (1975), and as the Judiciary Committee's Chief Counsel (1979-80). In 1980 he was appointed Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He became the Circuit's Chief Judge in 1990. He has also served as a Member of the Judicial Conference of the United States and of the United States Sentencing Commission. He has written books and articles in the field of administrative law and government regulation. President Clinton nominated him as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and he took office in August 1994. He recently wrote Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View (2010).
 
11Name:  Ms. Denise Scott Brown
 Institution:  Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates
 Year Elected:  2006
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1931
   
 
As an architect, planner, author and educator, Denise Scott Brown has helped to redirect the mainstream of modern architecture since the mid-1960s. No architect studying or in practice can have avoided her work or missed her call to broaden architecture to include ideas on pluralism and multiculturalism; social concern and activism; Pop Art, popular culture, and the everyday landscape; symbolism, iconography and context; the uses and misuses of history; electronic communication; the patterns of activities; the doctrine of functionalism; the relevance of mannerism; the role of generic building; and uncomfortably direct and uncomfortably indirect design--all these, in the making of architecture and urbanism today. Ms. Scott Brown feels she owes her views to a childhood and first architecture training at Witwatersrand University in South Africa in the 1940s and early 1950s, followed by London and the Architectural Association, 1952-55, and the University of Pennsylvania, 1958-1965. She received masters degrees in city planning and architecture from Penn and spent five years on the faculty while the social planning movement was being initiated there. She has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley, UCLA and Yale, Harvard and Princeton Universities and has lectured and advised world wide on architecture, urbanism and education. When she joined Robert Venturi in practice, she was well known for her contributions to theoretical research and education on the nature of cities. The early fruits of their collaboration were the research studies, "Learning from Las Vegas" and "Learning from Levittown." These projects and the book "Learning from Las Vegas (1972 by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, and Steven Izenour) challenged architects to study the human use and social context of architecture, the role of perception and memory in architecture, and the communicative possibilities of architecture. A primary focus had to do with symbolism and iconography. This turned the authors once again to history, to rediscover facets of architecture forgotten by the Modern Movement. Since 1967, as a leader of the firm now called Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, Denise has participated in a broad range of the firm's projects, including the Sainsbury Wing of the National Gallery in London, the Conseil Général complex in Toulouse, and the Mielparque Nikko Kirifuri hotel and spa near Nikko, Japan. As principal-in-charge for urban planning, urban design, and campus planning, her work has included urban planning for South Street, Philadelphia, Miami Beach, and Memphis, Tennessee; programming for the National Museum of the American Indian; and a plan for the Bouregreg Valley in Morocco. Today, Scott Brown focuses on urban university planning and design, where she employs tools evolved by melding the methods of planning and architecture. Her projects have included campus planning for Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania, Williams College, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard and the University of Kentucky. She directed the University of Michigan campus master plan and plans for several of its sub-campuses. In this role, she evolved the design concepts for the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, the Perelman Quadrangle precinct at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Life Sciences complex at the University of Michigan, and was able to exert guidance over these projects from campus planning, through design and construction, to successful use. Scott Brown has recently written on urban planning and design for the World Trade Center site, Philadelphia's Penn's Landing, and New Orleans and has a new book of collected essays out: Having Words. She has worked on a campus life plan and campus center for Brown University, a master plan update for Tsinghua University in Beijing, and a proposal for rehabilitating the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Among her awards are the Anne d'Harnoncourt Award for Artistic Excellence from the Arts & Business Council of Philadelphia (with Robert Venturi, 2010); the Vilcek Prize, awarded to a foreign-born American for outstanding achievement in the arts (architecture) and for contributions to society in the U.S., from the Vilcek Foundation (2007); the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum's National Design Mind Award (with Robert Venturi, 2007); the ACSA-AIA Topaz Medallion for distinguished teaching in architecture (1996); the Royal Society for the Encouragement of the Arts' Benjamin Franklin Medal (1993); the National Medal of Arts (1992); the Republic of Italy's Commendatore of the Order of Merit (1987); the Chicago Architecture Award (1987); the AIA Gold Medal (with Robert Venturi, 2016); and the Jane Drew Prize (2017).
 
12Name:  Mr. William T. Coleman
 Institution:  O'Melveny & Myers
 Year Elected:  2001
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1920
 Death Date:  March 31, 2017
   
 
William T. Coleman, Jr., was a Senior Partner and the Senior Counselor in O'Melveny & Myers LLP's Washington, D.C. office. He received his undergraduate education at the University of Pennsylvania and his law degree from Harvard University Law School in 1946, where he was an editor of the Law Review. As a member of Thurgood Marshall's legal team at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Mr. Coleman was a main architect of the legal strategy leading to Brown v. Board of Education and the desegregation of schools and other public facilities throughout the United States. He has played a leading role for nearly half a century in the effort to give reality to the principle of equality under the law. Mr. Coleman had extensive litigation experience in the corporate, antitrust, natural gas and constitutional law fields; foreign trade and other international matters; and the handling of corporate acquisitions and divestitures. In addition to his active practice of the law, he became president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund in 1971 - later serving as its chair - as well as adviser to six presidents, including Gerald Ford, who appointed him Secretary of Transportation in 1975. William T. Coleman was the recipient of numerous honors including the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1995), an officer of the French Legion of Honor (1979), the NAACP's Thurgood Marshall Lifetime Achievement Award (1997) and the Judge Henry J. Friendly Medal of the Council of the American Law Institute (2000). His autobiography, Counsel for the Situation, was released in 2010. Mr. Coleman was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2001. He died March 31, 2017, at the age of 96.
 
13Name:  The Honorable Sandra Day O'Connor
 Institution:  United States Supreme Court
 Year Elected:  1992
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1930
   
 
Sandra Day O'Connor received her B.A. and LL.B. from Stanford University. She served as Deputy County Attorney of San Mateo County, California, from 1952-53, and as a civilian attorney for Quartermaster Market Center, Frankfurt, Germany, from 1954-57. From 1958-60 she practiced law in Arizona and served as Assistant Attorney General of Arizona from 1965-69. She was appointed to the Arizona State Senate in 1969 and was subsequently reelected to two two-year terms. In 1975 she was elected Judge of the Maricopa County Superior Court and served until 1979, when she was appointed to the Arizona Court of Appeals. President Reagan nominated her as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and she took her seat in 1981, the first woman to sit on the Court. She retired from the Court in 2006. Justice O'Connor is the author of two books. Her first book, Lazy B: Growing Up on a Cattle Ranch in the American Southwest, written with her brother H. Alan Day and released in 2002, is described by the New York Times Book Review as "a loving but clear-eyed portrait of a distinctive and vanished American way of life." Her book In the Majesty of the Law explores the law, her life as a Justice, and how the Court has evolved as an American institution. In 2013 she wrote Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court. In cooperation wtih Georgetown University Law Center and Arizona State University, Justice O'Connor is also currently helping to develop Our Courts, a Web site and interactive civics curriculum for seventh, eighth and ninth grade students. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Justice O'Connor was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1992. She was awarded the Society's Benjamin Franklin Medal for Distinguished Public Service in 2003. The citation reads, "In recognition of her lifelong commitment to public service, including service in all three branches of State government in her native Arizona and, now for nearly twenty-two years, membership on the Supreme Court of the United States, and in recognition of the trailblazing example she has set for others as the first woman Majority Leader of a State Senate and as the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, and in recognition of her contributions to the work of the Court in thoughtful and well-written opinions, and in recognition of her valuable participation in the efforts of American lawyers and judges to promote the rule of law in Central and Eastern Europe."
 
14Name:  Dr. Morris Duane
 Institution:  Duane, Morris & Heckscher
 Year Elected:  1940
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1901
 Death Date:  7/18/92
   
15Name:  Lewis H. Van Dusen
 Institution:  Drinker, Biddle & Reath
 Year Elected:  1987
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1910
 Death Date:  November 16, 2004
   
16Name:  Mr. William H. Frederick
 Institution:  Private Gardens Incorporated
 Year Elected:  1995
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  August 15, 2018
   
 
William H. Frederick, Jr. gardened in Delaware from the age of eight. He was a registered landscape architect (Private Gardens, Incorporated), specializing in residential garden design, and a member of the Board of Longwood Gardens (Kennett Square, Pennsylvania). He was the author of 100 Great Garden Plants (1975, reprinted 1986) and The Exuberant Garden and the Controlling Hand (1992) and a contributor to Denise Magnani's The Winterthur Garden, Henry Francis du Pont's Romance with the Land. Frederick shared his knowledge of plants and design by serving as member of the Gibraltar Garden Restoration Committee, member of the Planning Review Committee of the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, and curator of the American Philosophical Society's Jefferson Garden. His achievements earned him awards including the Distinguished Achievement Medal, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 1980; The Henry Francis duPont Award for Garden Design, from Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library, 2001; and the Veitch Memorial Gold Medal, The Royal Horticultural Society, 2005.
 
17Name:  Mr. Thomas L. Friedman
 Institution:  The New York Times
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
For 20 years, sophisticated readers have turned to Thomas Friedman's reporting and commentary for guidance on major world events. As foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times since 1995, he has won three Pulitzer Prizes: two for international reporting (from Lebanon, 1983, and from Israel, 1988) and one for distinguished commentary, the latter of which, in 2002, commended his "clarity of vision based on extensive reporting." His From Beirut to Jerusalem has become a standard text on the Middle East. Mr. Friedman earned an M.A. in Modern Middle East Studies from Oxford University (1978) and has been a foreign correspondent and bureau chief in Beirut (1979-81, 1982-84) for United Press International and Jerusalem bureau chief (1984-88) and chief White House correspondent (1992-94) for The New York Times, among other positions. His most recent books are Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution - and How It Can Renew America (2008) and That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back (2011).
 
18Name:  The Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg
 Institution:  United States Supreme Court
 Year Elected:  2006
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1933
 Death Date:  September 18, 2020
   
 
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's remarkable career in the law encompassed three distinct roles: law professor; Supreme Court advocate; and jurist. In 1963 - four years after graduating from Columbia Law School - Justice Ginsburg was appointed to the faculty of the Rutgers Law School. In 1972 her Columbia teachers persuaded her to return as a colleague. A year after joining the Columbia faculty, Justice Ginsburg took on the added duties of counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). From then until 1980 she was concurrently a scholar/teacher at Columbia and the architect-plus-field commander of the ACLU's campaign to establish gender equality under law. In furtherance of that campaign Justice Ginsburg won a series of major victories in the Supreme Court. In 1980 President Carter appointed her to the bench as a Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In 1993, President Clinton appointed her to the Supreme Court. In Justice Ginsburg's more than fifteen years of service on the highest court, her luminous opinions have brought sharper definition to the interconnections and inter-independencies of the three branches of the national government, and to the relations between the nation and the states, and have measurably strengthened the constitutional rights and freedoms of us all. Her recent awards include: the Radcliffe Medal (2015), the Genesis Prize (2017), the American Law Institute's Henry J. Friendly Medal (2018), University of Chicago's Harris Dean's Award (2019), the Berggruen Prize (2019), and the Liberty Medal of the National Constitution Center (2020). She died at her home in Washington DC at the age of 87 on September 18, 2020.
 
19Name:  Ms. Linda Greenhouse
 Institution:  Yale Law School
 Year Elected:  2001
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Linda Greenhouse is a senior research scholar at Yale Law School, where she has taught since 2009. For 30 years before that, she was the Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for her reporting. In 2005 she was awarded the American Philosophical Society's Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities in recognition of her paper "'Because We Are Final': Judicial Review Two Hundred Years after Marbury," delivered as part of the symposium "The Two Hundredth Anniversary of Marbury v. Madison," at the Society's 2003 April Meeting and published in the March 2004 Proceedings. She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2001, became a Vice President of the Society in 2012, and was elected its President in 2017. She is a graduate of Radcliffe College, Harvard University, and earned the degree of Master of Studies in Law from Yale Law School, which she attended on a Ford Foundation Fellowship. Among numerous awards during a 40-year career in journalism were the Pulitzer Prize (1998); the Henry J. Friendly Medal from the American Law Institute, of which she is an honorary member; and the Carey McWilliams Award from the American Political Science Association for "a major journalistic contribution to our understanding of politics." In 2020 she received the Franklin Founder Award from "Celebration! of Benjamin Franklin, Founder," a consortium of representatives of Franklin-related institutions. Among her publications are Becoming Justice Blackmun (2005); (with Reva B. Siegel) Before Roe v. Wade: Voices That Shaped the Abortion Debate Before the Supreme Court's Ruling (2010); The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction (2012); and (with Michael J. Graetz) The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right (2016); Just A Journalist: On the Press, Life, and the Spaces Between (2017); and Justice on the Brink: The Death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Rise of Amy Coney Barrett, and Twelve Months That Transformed the Supreme Court. She is a former member of the Harvard University Board of Overseers and currently serves on the Senate of Phi Beta Kappa and the Council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
 
20Name:  Dame Zaha Hadid
 Institution:  Zaha Hadid Architects
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1950
 Death Date:  March 31, 2016
   
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