American Philosophical Society
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1Name:  Dr. Daron Acemoglu
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1967
   
2Name:  Dr. Anna Katherine Behrensmeyer
 Institution:  National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  203. Evolution & Ecology, Systematics, Population Genetics, Paleontology, and Physical Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Anna K. “Kay’ Behrensmeyer is a paleontologist and geologist who is recognized as a pioneer in the field of taphonomy and the study of land environments and faunas through geological time, with particular focus on the paleoecology of human evolution in Africa. She is originally from Quincy, Illinois and earned her undergraduate degree in geology from Washington University, St. Louis, and her doctorate in vertebrate paleontology and sedimentology from the Department of Geological Sciences, Harvard University. After post-doctoral positions at UC Berkeley and Yale University and an interval of teaching at UC Santa Cruz, in 1981 she became a Research Curator in Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. She has served as Acting Associate Director for Science at NMNH (1993-96), co-Director of the Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems (ETE) Program since 1988, and Deep Time Initiative Lead Scientist since 2014. Her research uses geology, paleontology, and ecology to investigate the paleoecology of land environments, and she has worked in time intervals ranging from the Permian to the Pleistocene in North America, Africa, and Pakistan. Through experiments and field observations in both modern and past environments, she has built understanding of processes that affect organic remains and control the information content of the fossil record. Much of her work has been collaborative and focused on synergizing team efforts to investigate ecological change through geological time. She has been involved with museum-based education and outreach and was a member of the exhibit core time for the recently renovated Deep Time Fossil Hall at NMNH. Awards include the 2016 R.C Moore Medal (SEPM), the 2018 Romer-Simpson Medal (Society of Vertebrate Paleontology), the 2018 Paleontological Society Medal, and the 2019 G.K. Warren Prize (National Academy of Sciences). She also is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. Kay lives in Arlington, Virginia, and is married to William F. Keyser.
 
3Name:  Dr. David W. Blight
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
David W. Blight is Sterling Professor of History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University. He previously taught at North Central College in Illinois, Harvard University, and Amherst College. He is the author or editor of a dozen books, including Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom; American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era; Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory; American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era; and A Slave No More: Two Post-Civil War Slave Narratives, and annotated editions of Douglass’s first two autobiographiers. He has worked on Douglass most much of his professional life, and been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the Bancroft Prize, the Abraham Lincoln Prize, and the Frederick Douglass Prize, among others. He writes frequently for the popular press, including the Atlantic, the New York Times, and many other journals. His lecture course on the Civil War and Reconstruction Era at Yale is on the internet at https://oyc.yale.edu/history/hist-119. He is an elected member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which award him the Gold Medal in History in 2020. Blight has always been a teacher first. At the beginning of his career, he spent seven years as a high school history teacher in his hometown of Flint, Michigan. Blight maintains a website, including information about public lectures, books, articles and interviews at http://www.davidwblight.com/.
 
4Name:  Dr. Tomiko Brown-Nagin
 Institution:  Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1970
   
 
Tomiko Brown-Nagin is an award-winning legal historian, an expert in constitutional law and education law and policy, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the American Law Institute, a member of the American Philosophical Society, a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, and a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. She has published articles and book chapters on a wide range of topics, including the Supreme Court’s equal protection jurisprudence, civil rights law and history, the Affordable Care Act, and education reform. Her 2011 book, Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement (Oxford), won six awards, including the Bancroft Prize in U.S. History. In her new book, Civil Rights Queen: Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle for Equality (Pantheon, forthcoming January 2022), Brown-Nagin explores the life and times of Constance Baker Motley, the pathbreaking lawyer, politician, and judge. In 2019, Brown-Nagin was appointed chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, which is anchored at the Radcliffe Institute. Brown-Nagin has previously served as faculty director of Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute and as codirector of Harvard Law School’s law and history program, among other leadership roles. She earned a law degree from Yale University, where she served as an editor of the Yale Law Journal; a doctorate in history from Duke University; and a BA in history, summa cum laude, from Furman University. Brown-Nagin held the 2016–2017 Joy Foundation Fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and became dean of the Institute on July 1, 2018.
 
5Name:  Dr. Diana L. Kormos Buchwald
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Diana Kormos Buchwald is the Robert M. Abbey Professor of History at the California Institute of Technology and is married to Jed Z. Buchwald (APS 2011), the Doris and Henry Dreyfuss Professor of History, also at Caltech. She is the Director of the Einstein Papers Project and General Editor of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Under her leadership, the project has published nine volumes with Princeton University Press, in both the original language and in English translation (17 volumes). This ongoing research effort is aimed at making available in print and online Einstein’s massive written legacy, which ranges from his work on the special and general theories of relativity and the origins of quantum theory, to his active involvement with international collaboration and cooperation, human rights, education, and disarmament. More than 10,000 documents have been made available so far. Diana Kormos Buchwald was trained in physical chemistry at the Technion Institute (BSc ’81) and the University of Tel Aviv (MSc ’83) before turning to the study of the history of modern science at Harvard University (Ph.D. ’90). She specializes in 19th and 20th century history of physical sciences, scientific institutions, instruments, and interdisciplinarity. She is a fellow of the AAAS, the American Physical Society, and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and the Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften, Vienna. She has recently joined the Advisory Board of the Global Observatory on Academic Freedom.
 
6Name:  Dr. Kathleen Mary Coleman
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Kathleen Coleman specializes in Latin literature and the social history and material culture of the early Roman empire. She was born in what is now Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1953. After taking degrees at the University of Cape Town and the University of Rhodesia (now the University of Zimbabwe), she received her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 1979. She then returned to the University of Cape Town to join the faculty, before taking up the Chair of Latin (1870) at Trinity College Dublin in 1993. In 1998 she moved to Harvard University, where she was named the James Loeb Professor of the Classics in 2010. She has published editions, with commentary, of Book 4 of the Siluae of Statius and the Liber spectaculorum of Martial, both with Oxford University Press. In tackling the latter project, she undertook an extensive investigation of Roman spectacle and punishment, for which much of the evidence survives in inscriptions and artefacts, rather than in literary sources. The result has been a long series of articles on various aspects of the culture and mentality that fueled the displays of the Roman amphitheatre. The combination of literature, epigraphy, and material culture has become a major focus of her research, leading her to such diverse topics as the ancient schoolroom, Roman mosaics, and the gardens of the Mediterranean world. She has also published articles on sociolinguistic features of Latin texts - specifically on parenthetical remarks in poems composed by Statius to honor his patrons and on bureaucratic language in official correspondence between the younger Pliny and the emperor Trajan - and she has published several studies of classical resonances in the work of the twentieth-century South African poet, Douglas Livingstone. She has delivered lectures on five continents, including the Jerome Lectures at the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (2010), and memorial lectures in honor of Sir Ronald Syme in Wellington, New Zealand (2008) and Oxford (2018). She has held fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (1987-88, 1992), the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2013-14), and the Institute for Advanced Study (2017-18). In 2012 she was elected a Corresponding Member of the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften and in 2020 a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. In 2011 she served as the President of the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and in 2020 she was elected President of the Internationale Thesaurus-Kommission, the international committee that oversees the publication of the Thesaurus linguae Latinae, which was begun in 1894 and comprises the most comprehensive lexicon of the Latin language ever undertaken. At Harvard, she has received multiple awards for teaching and mentoring: a Harvard College Professorship (2003-08); the Joseph R. Levenson Teaching Prize for Senior Faculty, awarded by the Undergraduate Council (2005); the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2019); and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Graduate Student Council (2020). Her greatest ambition is to visit every Roman province.
 
7Name:  Ms. Lydia Davis
 Institution:  SUNY Albany
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
8Name:  Dr. Philip J. Deloria
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Philip J. Deloria is the Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University, where his research and teaching focus on the social, cultural and political histories of the relations among American Indian peoples and the United States, as well as the comparative and connective histories of indigenous peoples in a global context. He is the Chair of the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), traced the tradition of white “Indian play” from the Boston Tea Party to the New Age movement, while his 2004 book Indians in Unexpected Places examined the ideologies surrounding Indian people in the early twentieth century and the ways Native Americans challenged them through sports, travel, automobility, and film and musical performance. He is the co-editor of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (with Neal Salisbury) and C.G. Jung and the Sioux Traditions by Vine Deloria (with Jerome Bernstein). Co-authored with Alexander Olson, American Studies: A User’s Guide (2017), offers a comprehensive treatment of the historiography and methodology of the field of American Studies. His most recent book is Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract (2019), which reclaims a previously unknown Native artist while offering a new exploration of American Indian visual arts of the mid-twentieth century. Deloria received the Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in 1994, taught for six years at the University of Colorado, and then at the University of Michigan from 2001 to 2017, before joining the faculty at Harvard in January 2018. At Michigan, he served as the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, Director of the Program in American Culture, and of the Native American Studies Program, and held the Carroll Smith-Rosenberg Collegiate Chair. His courses have included American Indian history, Environmental history, the American West, and American Studies methods, as well as Food Studies, Songwriting, and Big History. Deloria is a trustee of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, where he served for many years as chair of the Repatriation Committee. He is former president of the American Studies Association, an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the recipient of numerous prizes and recognitions and will serve as president of the Organization of American Historians in 2022.
 
9Name:  Dr. Ronald Egan
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Ronald Egan is Confucius Institute Professor of Sinology in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in Chinese literature from Harvard University, writing a dissertation on the early historical work Zuo zhuan under the direction of James Robert Hightower. His research focuses on Chinese literature, aesthetics, and cultural history of the Tang-Song period. His publications include books on the literary works and lives of Ouyang Xiu and Su Shi, the latter entitled Word, Image, and Deed in the Life of Su Shi. He has also published a general study of innovations in Song dynasty aesthetic thought, entitled The Problem of Beauty: Aesthetic Thought and Pursuits in Northern Song Dynasty China, now available in a Chinese edition from Shanghai Ancient Books Publishing Company. He is also the translator of selected essays from Qian Zhongshu’s Guanzui biani, which appeared as Limited Views: Essays on Ideas and Letters by Qian Zhongshu. A recent study concerns the works and reception history of the great woman poet of the twelfth century, Li Qingzhao, entitled The Burden of Female Talent: The Poet Li Qingzhao and Her History in China (Harvard University Press, 2013), also now available in a Chinese edition from Shanghai Ancient Books. Subsequently, he published a complete new translation of Li Qingzhao writings, available in a bilingual edition in the Library of Chinese Translations series (De Gruyter, 2019). He previously taught at the Harvard University, Wellesley College, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and UCLA. At UC Santa Barbara, where he taught for twenty-five years, he was the founding chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. He formerly served as Executive Editor of the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies and as President of the American Oriental Society.
 
10Name:  Dr. Elizabeth Anderson
 Institution:  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Elizabeth Anderson is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women’s & Gender Studies at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. In 1987, she earned her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard University, and joined the Philosophy Department at University of Michigan. Professor Anderson designed University of Michigan’s Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program, and was its founding director. She has won fellowships from the ACLS and Guggenheim Foundations, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the British Academy, served as President of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association, and is a 2019 MacArthur Fellow. She is the author of Value in Ethics and Economics (Harvard UP, 1993), The Imperative of Integration (Princeton UP, 2010), Private Government (How Employers Rule our Lives, and Why We Don’t Talk About It) (Princeton UP, 2017) and numerous, widely reprinted articles in journals of philosophy, law, and economics. She specializes in moral and political philosophy, social and feminist epistemology, and the philosophy of the social sciences. She has written extensively on egalitarianism, the interaction of facts and values in social science research, the intersection of democratic theory and social epistemology, and pragmatism. Her current research reconsiders the history of the Protestant work ethic from the 17th century to 21st century neoliberalism.
 
11Name:  Dr. Joseph S. Francisco
 Institution:  University of Pennsylvania; Purdue University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  102. Chemistry and Chemical Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Joseph S. Francisco is the President's Distinguished Professor of Earth and Environmental Science and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. at the University of Texas at Austin, and he received his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Francisco was a Research Fellow at University of Cambridge in England, and a Visiting Associate in Planetary Science at California Institute of Technology. His research has focused on bringing new tools from experimental physical and theoretical chemistry to atmospheric chemical problems to enhance our understanding of chemistry in the atmosphere at the molecular level. This work has led to important discoveries of new chemistries occurring on the interfaces of cloud surfaces as well as fundamental new chemical bonding controlling these processes. He has been an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. He was awarded an Alexander von Humboldt U.S. Senior Scientist Award; appointed a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Bologna, Italy; Professeur Invité at the Université de Paris-Est, France; a Visiting Professor at Uppsala Universitet, Sweden; an Honorary International Chair Professor at National Taipei University, Taiwan; and an Honorary Professor, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China. He served as President of the American Chemical Society in 2010. Dr. Francisco currently serves as Executive and Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society and on the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Joseph S. Francisco was elected, to the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, as well as, a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2021.
 
12Name:  Ms. Denyce Graves
 Institution:  Denyce Graves Foundation; Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1964
   
 
Recognized worldwide as one of today's most exciting vocal stars, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves continues to gather unparalleled popular and critical acclaim in performances on four continents. USA Today identifies her as "an operatic superstar of the 21st Century," and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution exclaims, "if the human voice has the power to move you, you will be touched by Denyce Graves." Her career has taken her to the world's great opera houses and concert halls. The combination of her expressive, rich vocalism, elegant stage presence and exciting theatrical abilities allows her to pursue a wide breadth of operatic portrayals and to delight audiences in concert and recital appearances. Denyce Graves has become particularly well-known to operatic audiences for her portrayals of the title roles in Carmen and Samson et Dalila. These signature roles have brought Ms. Graves to the Metropolitan Opera, Vienna Staatsoper, Royal Opera - Covent Garden, San Francisco Opera, Opéra National de Paris, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Washington Opera, Bayerische Staatsoper, Arena di Verona, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Opernhaus Zürich, Teatro Real in Madrid, Houston Grand Opera, Dallas Opera, Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Los Angeles Opera and the Festival Maggio Musi- cale in Florence. Ms. Graves’s 2012-2013 season includes two world premieres; she creates the roles of Mrs. Miller in Minnesota Opera’s New Works Initiative commission of Doubt, composed by Douglas J. Cuomo and directed by Kevin Newbury, and of Emelda in Cham- pion by Terence Blanchard at the Opera Theatre of St. Louis. The season also marks two role debuts for Ms. Graves as Herodias in Strauss’ Salome at Palm Beach Opera, and Katisha in Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Mikado with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City. Ms. Graves makes numerous concert and recital performances including at Opera Carolina, Arizona Musicfest, National Philhar- monic, San Diego Symphony and several prestigious universities throughout the nation. As Ms. Graves’s dedication to teaching the singers of the next generation continues to be an important part of her career, she joins the voice faculty of the Peabody Con- servatory of Music in Baltimore. Denyce Graves made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in the 1995–1996 season in the title role of Carmen. She returned the following season to lead the new Franco Zeffirelli production of this work, conducted by James Levine, and she sang the opening night performance of the Metropolitan Opera's 1997–1998 season as Carmen opposite Plácido Domingo. She was seen again that season as Bizet's gypsy on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera for Domingo's 30th Anniversary Gala, and she made her debut in Japan as Carmen, opposite the Don José of Roberto Alagna. Ms. Graves appeared in a new production of Samson et Dalila opposite Plácido Domingo at the Metropolitan Opera, and she performed Act III of this work opposite Mr. Domingo to open the Met’s season in 2005. She was partnered again with Mr. Domingo in the 1999 season-opening performances of this work for Los Angeles Opera. She was seen as Saint-Saëns’ seductress with Royal Opera – Covent Garden and Washington Opera, both opposite José Cura, the latter under the baton of Maestro Domingo, as well as with Houston Grand Opera. Her debut in this sig- nature role came in 1992 with the Chicago Symphony at the Ravinia Festival under the direction of James Levine and opposite Mr. Domingo and Sherrill Milnes, and she made a return engagement to the Festival in this same role in 1997. Ms. Graves appears continually in a broad range of repertoire with leading theaters in North America, Europe and Asia. Highlights have included a Robert Lepage production of The Rake’s Progress at San Francisco Opera, the title role in Richard Danielpour’s Margaret Garner in the world premiere performances at Michigan Opera Theatre with further performances at Cincinnati Opera, Opera Carolina and the Opera Company of Philadelphia, the role of Charlotte in Werther for Michigan Opera Theatre opposite the Werther of Andrea Bocelli in his first staged operatic performances and Judith in a William Friedkin production of Bartok’s Blue- beard’s Castle in her return to Los Angeles Opera: she also has sung Judith at the Washington National Opera and for the Dallas Opera. Highlights of the mezzo-soprano’s other recent appearances include Azucena in Il trovatore, Nicklausse in Les contes d’Hoffmann and Dulcinée in Massenet's Don Quichotte with Washington Opera; Giovanna Seymour in a new production of Anna Bolena for Dallas Opera; the title role in La Périchole with the Opera Company of Philadelphia; a rare double-bill of El amor brujo and La vida breve specifically mounted for her by Dallas Opera; Federica in the Metropolitan Opera’s new production of Luisa Miller, led by James Levine; and Amneris in Aida with Cincinnati Opera. Ms. Graves’s debut with the Théâtre Musical de Paris – Chatelet was as Baba the Turk in a Peter Sellars/Esa-Pekka Salonen production of The Rake's Progress, and she returned to Covent Garden as Cuniza in Verdi's Oberto after her debut performances as Carmen. Her debut at Teatro alla Scala was as the High Priestess in La vestale led by Riccardo Muti, and she soon returned as Giulietta in a new production of Les contes d'Hoff- mann and as Mère Marie in the Robert Carsen production of Dialogues des Carmélites. She appeared at Teatro Bellini in Catania in the title role of La favorita, and audi- ences in Genoa saw her first performances of Charlotte soon after her debut there as Carmen. Her debut in Austria came as Carmen with the Vienna Staatsoper, and she has also been seen in this role with Grand Théâtre de Genève, Genoa’s Teatro Carlo Felice, the Bregenz Festival and festivals in Macerata, Italy and San Sebastian, Spain. Ms. Graves gave her first performances of Adalgisa in Norma for Opernhaus Zürich. Denyce Graves has worked with leading symphony orchestras and conductors throughout the world in a wide range of repertoire. She has performed with Riccardo Chailly, Myung-Whun Chung, Charles Dutoit, Christoph Eschenbach, James Levine, Zubin Mehta, Lorin Maazel, Kurt Masur, Riccardo Muti and Mstislav Rostropovich. Ms. Graves has appeared with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo and National Symphony Orchestra among a host of others. One of the music world's most sought-after recitalists, Ms. Graves combines her expressive vocalism and exceptional gifts for communication with her dynamic stage presence, enriching audiences around the world. Her programs include classical repertoire of German lieder, French mélodie and English art song, as well as the popular music of Broadway musicals, crossover and jazz together with American spirituals. For her New York recital debut, The New York Times wrote, "[h]er voice is dusky and earthy. She is a strikingly attractive stage presence and a communicative artist who had the audience with her through four encores." In 2001, Ms. Graves gave a series of appearances in response to the tragic events in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Shanksville, Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. Ms. Graves was invited by President Bush to participate in the National Prayer Service in Washington's National Cathedral in which she sang “America, the Beauti- ful” and “The Lord’s Prayer.” This event was televised worldwide and was followed by Ms. Graves’ appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show in a live musical program of “Healing through Gospel Music.” Ms. Graves has since participated in numerous other benefit concerts, and RCA Records released a recording of patriotic songs by Denyce Graves, the proceeds of which benefit various groups who have been affected by the events of September 11. Ms. Graves recently continued her patriotic activi- ties when she sang for President and Mrs. Bush, among other dignitaries, at “An American Celebration at Ford’s Theatre” to benefit U.S. soldiers in Iraq. This concert was taped for television and aired on the ABC network on July 4, 2005. In 2003, Denyce Graves was appointed as a Cultural Ambassador for the United States, and she now travels around the world under the auspices of the State Department appearing in good-will missions of musical performances, lectures, and seminars. Her first trips in 2003 brought her to Poland, Romania and Venezuela. Ms. Graves appears regularly on radio and television as a musical performer, celebrity guest, and as the subject of documentaries and other special programming. In 1997 PBS Productions released a video and audio recording titled, Denyce Graves: A Cathedral Christmas, featuring Ms. Graves in a program of Christmas music from Washington's National Cathedral. This celebration of music including chorus and orchestra is shown each year on PBS during the Christmas season. She was seen on the Emmy-award winning BBC special “The Royal Opera House,” highlighting Ms. Graves’s debut performances there, and in a program of crossover repertoire with the Boston Pops, which was taped for national television broadcast. In December 1999 Ms. Graves participated in a concert given at the Nobel Peace Prize Awards in Oslo, Norway, which was televised throughout Europe. As the only classical music artist to be invited for this event, she performed selections from her RCA Red Seal release alongside performances by Sting, Paul Simon, Tina Turner and others. She has been a frequent guest on television shows including Sesame Street, The Charlie Rose Show and Larry King Live. In 1996, she was the subject of an Emmy-award winning profile on CBS's 60 Minutes. In 1999, Denyce Graves began a relationship with BMG Classics/RCA Red Seal. That same year Voce di Donna, a solo recording of opera arias, was released on RCA Red Seal. The Lost Days, a recording with jazz musicians of Latin songs in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, was released in January 2003. In June 2003, Church was released – this recording, developed by Denyce Graves, brings together African-American divas from various forms of music, all of whom were first exposed to music through their upbringing in church. Participants recorded music of their choice and include Dr. Maya Angelou, Dionne Warwick, En Vogue, Patti LaBelle and others. Other recordings of Ms. Graves include NPR Classics’ release of a recording of spirituals, Angels Watching Over Me, featuring the mezzo-soprano in performance with her fre- quent partner, Warren Jones and an album of French arias, Héroïnes de l'Opéra romantique Français, with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo under Marc Soustrot. Her full opera recordings include Gran Vestale in La vestale, recorded live from La Scala with Riccardo Muti for Sony Classical; Queen Gertrude in Thomas’s Hamlet for EMI Classics; Maddalena in Rigoletto with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra under James Levine; and Emilia in Otello with Plácido Domingo and the Opéra de Paris, Bastille Orchestra under Myung-Whun Chung, both for Deutsche Grammophon. Denyce Graves is a native of Washington, D.C., where she attended the Duke Ellington School for the Performing Arts. She continued her education at Oberlin Col- lege Conservatory of Music and the New England Conservatory. In 1998, Ms. Graves received an honorary doctorate from Oberlin College Conservatory of Music. She was named one of the "50 Leaders of Tomorrow" by Ebony magazine and was one of Glamour magazine's 1997 "Women of the Year." In 1999, WQXR Radio in New York named her as one of classical music's "Standard Bearers for the 21st Century." Denyce Graves has been invited on several occasions to perform in recital at the White House, and she provides many benefit performances for various causes special to her throughout each season. Denyce Graves has been the recipient of many awards, including the Grand Prix du Concours International de Chant de Paris, the Eleanor Steber Music Award in the Opera Columbus Vocal Competition and a Jacobson Study Grant from the Richard Tucker Music Foundation. In 1991, she received the Grand Prix Lyrique, awarded once every three years by the Association des amis de l’opéra de Monte-Carlo, and the Marian Anderson Award, presented to her by Miss Anderson. In addition, Ms. Graves has received honorary doctorates from Oberlin College, College of Saint Mary and Centre College.
 
13Name:  Ms. Joy Harjo
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
14Name:  Dr. Kristen Hawkes
 Institution:  Univresity of Utah
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  203. Evolution & Ecology, Systematics, Population Genetics, Paleontology, and Physical Anthropology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Kristen Hawkes is Distinguished Professor in Anthropology at the University of Utah who continues to investigate human life history evolution. That began with ethnographic behavioral ecology in two hunter-gatherer communities where hunters fail daily but successes are bonanzas for all. Those findings suggested men’s risky hunting may be better explained as status competition than as paternal provisioning. Quantitative observations showed savanna hunter-gatherers’ day-to-day reliance on resources that infants and children are too small to acquire for themselves. In contrast, our great ape cousins rely on foods that infants pick and eat while still nursing. That contrast, combined with evolutionary theory to explain mammalian life history variation, highlighted the importance of Hadza grandmothers’ dependable foraging productivity. Their reliable subsidies for dependent juveniles allow mothers to bear next babies sooner. The same tradeoffs that modern Hadza face likely confronted ancestral hominin populations colonizing the expanding savannas in ancient Africa. Mathematical modeling to explore likely consequences shows that given mammalian regularities, great ape-like life histories plus grandmothers’ subsidies evolve human-like postmenopausal longevity, slower maturation, shorter birth intervals and male-biased sex ratios in the fertile ages. Initially aimed to explain the evolution of postmenopausal longevity, a grandmother hypothesis now helps explain other distinctly human features, including pair bonding, bigger brains, and preoccupation with engaging others that begins in infancy. Hawkes received a BS from Iowa State, MA and PhD from the University of Washington in Cultural Anthropology, and a long (informal) postdoc in Evolutionary Ecology after joining the Utah Anthropology faculty. A member of the Scientific Executive Council of the Leakey Foundation, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
 
15Name:  Dr. Arlie Russell Hochschild
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  301. Anthropology, Demography, Psychology, and Sociology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Educated at Swarthmore College (BA 1962) and UC Berkeley (MA 1965, PhD 1969), Arlie Russell Hochschild is a sociologist whose body of work is ethnographic in method, theoretical in focus, and broad-reaching in its areas of concern. Method: While virtually all of her work is based on close-up observations and interviews, her topics have varied widely. For example, dual-job families raising young children (The Second Shift), love coaches, bereavement assistants, and gestational surrogates at a clinic in Gujarat, India (The Outsourced Self), occupants of a low-incoming housing project for the elderly (The Unexpected Community) and Tea Party and Trump enthusiasts living in the showdown of the Louisiana petrochemical industry (Strangers in Their Own Land). In what will be her tenth book, she’s currently doing interviews with poor whites conservatives and liberals in Appalachian Kentucky. Purpose: How much and how, she has asked, is emotion shaped by social life? More than we have imagined, she suggests, and in a wide variety of ways. For example, our social and cultural circumstances help shape how we recognize or ignore, label, interpret and judge emotion. We are virtually always applying “feeling rules” she argues, to whatever it is we feel. In any given circumstance, we ask ourselves, does an emotion feel normal? Understandable? Fitting or right? Given such feeling rules, we then manage emotion in socially various ways in both private or public life. All of this shows how “deep the social cuts” and therefore how consequential are our cultural beliefs and social arrangements in family, economic and political life. She recently applied this approach to care workers managing the crisis of Covid-19. Other scholars, too, have used and developed the concept of emotional labor, which has, like the idea of a “second shift,” gone mainstream. The American Sociological Association now has an organized section for the study of emotions. Outreach: Throughout her career, she has striven to speak to both a professional and public audience. A number of her books have been New York Times bestsellers. To date, Strangers in Their Own Land has sold a quarter of a million copies, and a four-part documentary based on it is currently in production. Plays have been based on The Time Bind ( “Work Will Make You Free” by the Royal Danish Theatre) and a musical, “One State, Two State, Red State, Blue State” based on Strangers was performed at Suffolk University in Boston. She has written book reviews for the New York Review of Books, the New York Times, and opinion pieces for the Times, the Guardian, and other newspapers. She has also authored a children’s book, Colleen, the Question Girl. Hochschild holds eight honorary doctorates from such institutions as Harvard University (2021), the University of Lausanne (2018), the University of Oslo (2000), and Swarthmore College (1993), as well as the Ulysses Medal from the University College Dublin, (2015). She has won Guggenheim, Mellon, Ford, Sloan and Fulbright fellowships as well as five awards bestowed by the American Sociological Association. These include the Charles Cooley Award (for The Managed Heart), the Jessie Bernard Award (for The Second Shift, The Time Bind, and Global Woman), and the Award for Public Understanding of Sociology (for lifetime achievement). In awarding her the Jessie Bernard Award, the citation observed her "creative genius for framing questions and lines of insight, often condensed into memorable, paradigm-shifting words and phrases." Strangers in Their Own Land was a finalist for the National Book Award and her work appears in 17 languages.
 
16Name:  Dr. Barbara V. Jacak
 Institution:  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  106. Physics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
17Name:  Dr. Sheila Sen Jasanoff
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
SHEILA JASANOFF is Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Previously, she was founding chair of Cornell University’s Department of Science and Technology Studies. At Harvard, she founded and directs the Program on Science, Technology and Society; she also founded and coordinates the Science and Democracy Network. Jasanoff’s research centers on the interactions of law, science, and politics in democratic societies. She has written more than 130 articles and book chapters and authored or edited more than 15 books, including The Fifth Branch, Science at the Bar, and Designs on Nature. An edited volume, Dreamscapes of Modernity, was published in 2015. Her most recent books, The Ethics of Invention and Can Science Make Sense of Life?, appeared in 2016 and 2019, respectively. Her work has been translated into multiple languages. Jasanoff has held distinguished professorships in the US, Europe, Australia, and Japan. She was a Fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and Karl W. Deutsch Guest Professor at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin. Her awards include a Guggenheim fellowship, the 2018 A. O. Hirschman prize of the Social Science Research Council, the Reimar-Lüst Prize of the Humboldt Foundation, the Austrian Government’s Ehrenkreuz, and the Bernal award of the Society for Social Studies of Science. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations, and a foreign member of the British Academy and the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. She holds an A.B. in Mathematics from Harvard College, a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School, as well as honorary doctorates from the Universities of Twente and Liège.
 
18Name:  Dr. Marc Kirschner
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  202. Cellular and Developmental Biology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
19Name:  Dr. Trudy F. C. Mackay
 Institution:  Clemson University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  207. Genetics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Trudy Mackay received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. from Dalhousie University, Canada and her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh. She has been a faculty member at the University of Edinburgh and North Carolina State University. Currently, she is the Director of the Center for Human Genetics, the Self Family Endowed Chair of Human Genetics and Professor of Genetics and Biochemistry at Clemson University. Her laboratory focuses on understanding the genetic and environmental factors affecting variation in quantitative traits, using Drosophila as a translational model system. Her laboratory seeks to identify the genetic loci at which segregating and mutational variation occurs, allelic effects and environmental sensitivities, and the causal molecular variants. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Society, a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, the 2016 Wolf Prize Laureate for Agriculture and the 2018 Dawson Prize recipient, Trinity College, Dublin.
 
20Name:  Dr. Mary Miller
 Institution:  Getty Research Institute
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Mary Miller became Director of the Getty Research Institute on January 1, 2019. She was Sterling Professor of History of Art at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College from 2008-2014. Mary Miller has held many administrative posts at Yale and served as Dean of Yale College 2008-2014. From 2016-18, she was Senior Director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage on Yale’s West Campus. In that capacity, she advanced the sustainable care, study, and use of the world’s cultural heritage through multidisciplinary research, innovation in technology and conservation practice, education, and advocacy. Professor Miller is a specialist of the art of the ancient New World and has been recognized for both her scholarly contributions and her curatorial expertise. She curated The Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in 2004 and co-curated landmark exhibition The Blood of Kings with Linda Schele at the Kimbell Art Museum in 1986. For both exhibitions, she co-wrote the catalogues of the same title, the former with Simon Martin, and the latter with Linda Schele. Among her many books are The Murals of Bonampak, The Art of Mesoamerica (now entering its 6th edition), Maya Art and Architecture (with Megan O’Neil), The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (with Karl Taube), and A Pre-Columbian World (co-edited with Jeffrey Quilter). With Barbara Mundy, Miller edited Painting a Map of Mexico City, a study of the rare indigenous map in the Beinecke Library (2012); and with Claudia Brittenham, she wrote The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (2013). For her work on ancient Mexico and the Maya, Miller has won national recognition including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Getty Grant. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. She delivered the Fifty-ninth A W Mellon lectures at the National Gallery of Art in 2010 and the Slade Lectures at Cambridge University in 2015. A national Phi Beta Kappa lecturer in 2016-17, she will be OCAT lecturer in Beijing later in 2021.
 
Election Year
2021[X]
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