American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Resident[X]
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
406. Linguistics[X]
1Name:  Dr. Brian Joseph
 Institution:  Ohio State University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Brian Daniel Joseph is currently Distinguished University Professor, Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of Slavic Languages and Linguistics, Professor of Linguistics, at the Ohio State University. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1978 before beginning his career at Ohio State. Brian Joseph’s illuminating introductory paper from our Spring 2017 meeting (now published in Proceedings 162, 1) synthesized the issues in reconciling the linguistic and DNA-derived evidence of the peopling of Europe with languages of the Indo-European family. His own prodigious research and publication as an Indo-Europeanist and Balkanologist has centered on the prehistory and history of Greek over its 3500 years and its complex, now millennium-old relations to languages of the other families of the region, principally Albanian, South Slavic, and Turkish. Bringing to this work a profound mastery of contemporary morphological and syntactic theory, his scholarship has decisively rejuvenated linguists’ sense of the unique internal coherence of language as a grammatical structure, yet one ever adapting to the sometimes complex, multilingual social conditions that sustain it. He is the defining master in his generation of theoretically informed historical linguistics. Author or co-author of over 250 substantial journal articles and book chapters, of seven published books and 19 edited volumes or special journal issues, Joseph has also served the entire field of linguistics as editor of its flagship journal, Language. He is the author of: The Synchrony and Diachrony of the Balkan Infinitive: A Study in Areal, General, and Historical Linguistics, 1983 (reprint 2009); Morphology and Universals in Syntactic Change: Evidence from Medieval and Modern Greek, 1990; (with H. Hock) Language Change, Language History, and Language Relationship: An Introduction to Historical Linguistics, 1996; The Modern Greek Weak Subject Pronoun τος, 2015; (with P. Pappas) Modern Greek – A Grammatical Sketch, 2016; (with V. Friedman) The Balkan Languages, 2018. He has edited: (with P. Postal) Studies in Relational Grammar 3, 1990; (with R. Janda) Handbook of Historical Linguistics, 2003; (with A. Ralli, M. Janse) Studies in Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory, 2011. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2004), American Association for the Advancement of Science (2007), Linguistic Society of America (2010) (vice-president/president-elect, 2018). Brian Joseph was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
2Name:  Dr. Jonathan Lear
 Institution:  Universiy of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Jonathan Lear is currently John U. Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought and Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University in 1978. He started his career in Clare College at University of Cambridge and moved to Yale University, including as Kingman Brewster Professor of the Humanities, before ending up at the University of Chicago. Jonathan Lear has, over the last twenty years, consistently been the leading defender of the philosophical dimensions of psychoanalytic theory, bringing out a level of sophistication and rigor in Freud’s thought often neglected in conventional criticisms. One might say that his major topic in a great deal of his work has been how to account for human irrationality in thought and action, and the bearing of the inescapable fact of irrationality on conceptions of how to live well. Both inside and outside philosophy he is probably best known for his extraordinary 2006 book, Radical Hope, on one level an investigation about how the Crow nation survived the dissolution of their traditional way of life, and on another level an exploration of what a collective form of life could be that it could “die out,” and what one might be called on to do in situations of potential cultural despair. His honors and awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987-88) and a Distinguished Achievement Award in the Humanities from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (2011-14). He is a member of American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2017). He has authored: Aristotle and Logical Theory, 1980, 2010; Aristotle: The Desire to Understand, 1988; Love and its Place in Nature: A Philosophical Interpretation of Freudian Psychoanalysis, 1990, 1999; Open Minded: Working Out The Logic of the Soul, 1998; Happiness, Death and the Remainder of Life, 2000; Therapeutic Action: An Earnest Plea for Irony, 2003; Freud, 2005, 2015; Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation, 2006; The Idea of a Philosophical Anthropology: The Spinoza Lectures, 2017; Wisdom Won From Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis, 2017. Jonathan Lear was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
Election Year
2019[X]