American Philosophical Society
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1Name:  Mr. S. James Anaya
 Institution:  University of Colorado Law School, Boulder
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
 
S. James Anaya is currently Dean and Charles Inglis Thomson Professor at the University of Colorado Law School. He earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1983. Prior to coming to the University of Colorado, he worked with the National Indian Youth Council, at the University of Iowa College of Law, as Special Rapporteur for Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations, and the University of Arizona Regents’ and James J. Lenoir Professor of Human Rights Law and Policy at the James E. Rogers College of Law of the University of Arizona. James Anaya teaches, writes, and litigates in the areas of international human rights, constitutional law, and the rights of indigenous peoples. He occupies a unique position in international indigenous rights and at the United Nations, and is internationally acknowledged as an articulate spokesperson. In 2014, he completed two terms as the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Prior to working at the U.N., he helped indigenous peoples win groundbreaking cases before the Organization of American States and he produced important and innovative scholarship on indigenous international rights. He helped shape and influence the development of international law. As the Rapporteur, he reported on the conditions of indigenous peoples worldwide and responded to allegations of human rights violations. His work included visiting affected countries and writing official reports, and direct contacts with governments and indigenous peoples. He also helped draft the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Among his awards are: the Haywood Burns / Shanara Gilbert Award of the Northeast People of Color Conference (2009); the Bernard S. Rodey Award of the University of New Mexico Alumni Association (2014); and the Goler T. Butcher Award of the American Society of International Law (2016). He is the author of: Indigenous Peoples in International Law, 1996; International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples, 2009; (with H. Hannum, D. Shelton) International Human Rights: Problems of Law, Policy and Practice, 2011. James Anaya was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
2Name:  Dr. Larry M. Bartels
 Institution:  Vanderbilt University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Larry M. Bartels is Professor of Political Science, May Werthan Shayne Chair of Public Policy and Social Science, and Co-director of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions at Vanderbilt University. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of California in 1983. He started his career at the University of Rochester, then moved to Princeton University as Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs of the Woodrow Wilson School, followed by the Donald E. Stokes Professor of Public and International Affairs. Larry Bartels is a leading scholar of US politics, having made landmark contributions to the study of public opinion, electoral politics, public policy, and political representation. His recent books include Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age and Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government (with Christopher Achen). Unequal Democracy demonstrates with great care the emergence of a partisan political pattern to the size of the gap between the rich and the poor. Republican presidents have allowed income inequality to expand, while Democratic presidents generally have not. In Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government, Bartels challenges the popular version of democracy that presumes that voting is undertaken by the omnipotent, sovereign citizens. Instead, he argues that voters tend to base their decision-making on partisan loyalties, leaving the current democratic system open to exploitation by powerful, unscrupulous actors. He has won the Gladys M. Kammerer Award in 2009 and the Warren E. Miller Prize in 2014, both from the American Political Science Association, the David O. Sears Award of the International Society of Political Psychology in 2017, and the Earl Sutherland Prize for Career Achievement in Research from Vanderbilt University in 2017. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1995), the American Academy of Political and Social Science (2010), and the National Academy of Sciences (2012). In addition to the above, he is the author of Primaries and the Dynamics of Public Choice (1988) and editor of (with L. Vavreck) Campaign Reform: Insights and Evidence. Larry Bartels was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
3Name:  Dr. David L. Donoho
 Institution:  Stanford University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  104. Mathematics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
 
David L. Donoho is currently Professor of Statistics and Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1984. Prior to moving to Stanford, he worked for a decade at the University of California, Berkeley. Dramatic developments in technology present fundamental new challenges in theoretical and applied mathematical statistics. David Donoho has played a major role in building powerful new mathematical and statistical tools to deal with these problems, ranging from how best to extract information from large data-sets in high dimensions to how to deal with contamination by noise. His work provides fast, efficient, and often optimal algorithms that are founded on rigorous mathematical analysis. He introduced many now standard techniques that overcome difficulties caused by noise with very little loss of efficiency or reliability. Along the way, he demonstrated the power of the mathematical theory of wavelets in dealing with such problems in statistics. He also developed efficient techniques for sparse representation and recovery in large data-sets. Among his awards are a MacArthur Fellowship in 1991, the John von Neumann Prize of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2001, the Weiner Prize of AMS-SIAM in 2011, and the Shaw Prize in 2013. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1998), French Academy of Sciences (2009), and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2012). David Donoho was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
4Name:  Mr. William Drayton
 Institution:  Ashoka: Innovators for the Public
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
As the Founder and CEO of Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, Bill Drayton has pioneered the field of social entrepreneurship, growing a global association of over 3,900 leading social entrepreneurs who work together to create an “Everyone a Changemaker” world and bring big systems-change to the world’s most urgent social challenges. Bill also chairs Get American Working!, Youth Venture, and Community Greens. He earned his BA from Harvard, an MA from Balliol College in Oxford University, and is a graduate of Yale Law School. Drayton had a 10-year career with McKinsey and Company, taught at Stanford Law School and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and served as Assistant Administrator for the EPA during the Carter Administration. Bill has been selected as one of America’s Best Leaders by US News & World Report and Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership. In 2011, Drayton won Spain’s prestigious Prince of Asturias Award, commonly described as Spain’s Nobel, for his work in social entrepreneurship. Other awards include Honorary Doctorates from Yale, NYU, and more; the Yale Law School’s highest alumni honor; an Honorary Fellow at Oxford’s Balliol College; the National Wildlife Federation’s Conservation Achievement Award International; the National Academy of Public Administration National Public Service Award; and the Harvard Kennedy School Richard E. Neustadt Award for Public Policy.
 
5Name:  Dr. Catherine Dulac
 Institution:  Harvard University; Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  208. Plant Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1963
   
 
Catherine Dulac is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. Her work explores the identity and function of neural circuits underlying instinctive social behaviors in mice, and the role of genomic imprinting in the adult and developing brain. She grew up in Montpellier, France, graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, and received her PhD from the University of Paris VI. She was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University and joined the faculty of Harvard as a junior faculty in 1996, before becoming full professor in 2001, and Chair of Harvard's Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology from 2007 until 2013. She is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and of the French Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a recipient of multiple awards including the Richard Lounsbery Award, the National Academy’s Pradel Research Award, the Edward M. Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award from the American Philosophical Society, and the 2021 Breakthrough Prize for Life Sciences.
 
6Name:  Dr. Kathy Eden
 Institution:  Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Kathy Eden, Chavkin Family Professor of English and Professor of Classics at Columbia University, studies the history of rhetoric, Renaissance humanism, and the way the rediscovery of ancient Greek and Roman works of literature and literary theory impacted the reading and writing practices of early modern Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. Her research has been supported by a number of foundations and institutions, including the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C., the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and All Souls, University of Oxford. In addition to publishing articles on texts as wide-ranging as Aristotle’s Poetics, Augustine’s On Christian Doctrine, Erasmus’ De copia, and Shakespeare’s King Lear, she is the author of a number of books, including Poetic and Legal Fiction in the Aristotelian Tradition (1986), Hermeneutics and the Rhetorical Tradition: Chapters in the Ancient Legacy and Its Humanist Reception (1997), Friends Hold All Things in Common: Tradition, Intellectual Property and the “Adages” of Erasmus (2001), winner of the Roland H. Bainton Prize for Literature, and The Renaissance Rediscovery of Intimacy (2012). Between 2008 and 2012 she served as editor of the Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook. At Columbia, where Eden also served as chair of the program of Literature Humanities, she has won several teaching awards, including the Mark Van Doren Award, the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching, and the Great Teachers’ Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. Eden received her B.A. from Smith College and her Ph.D. from Stanford University.
 
7Name:  Dr. Kerry Emanuel
 Institution:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Dr. Kerry Emanuel is the Cecil and Ida Green professor of atmospheric science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been on the faculty since 1981, after spending three years on the faculty of UCLA. Emanuel’s initial focus was on the dynamics of rain and snow banding in winter storms, but his interests gradually migrated to the meteorology of the tropics and to climate change. His specialty is hurricane physics and he was the first to investigate how long-term climate change might affect hurricane activity, an issue that continues to occupy him today. His interests also include cumulus convection, and advanced methods of sampling the atmosphere in aid of numerical weather prediction. Emanuel is the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and three books, including Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes, published by Oxford University Press and aimed at a general audience, and What We Know about Climate Change, published by the MIT Press and now entering its third edition. He is a co-director of MIT’s Lorenz Center, a climate think tank devoted to basic, curiosity-driven climate research.
 
8Name:  Dr. Erin K. O'Shea
 Institution:  Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  201. Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1965
   
 
Erin O’Shea is president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), a top biomedical philanthropy. HHMI is known for driving science forward by investing in scientists, educators and students with the potential to make transformative change. O’Shea is the first woman to lead HHMI. A leader in the scientific fields of gene regulation, signal transduction, and systems biology, O’Shea maintains a research lab at HHMI’s Janelia Research Campus. She previously served as the Institute’s Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer and has been an HHMI investigator since 2000. Prior to joining HHMI, O’Shea was the director of Harvard University’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences Center for Systems Biology and its Paul C. Mangelsdorf Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Chemistry and Chemical Biology. O’Shea has also served on the faculty at the University of California, San Francisco. She earned a PhD in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an undergraduate degree in biochemistry from Smith College. O’Shea is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Microbiology. In 2017, Washingtonian magazine named her "one of Washington’s 100 most powerful women."
 
9Name:  Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher
 Institution:  Dana Farber Cancer Institute; Harvard Medical School
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  209. Neurobiology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Laurie H. Glimcher is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She earned her M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1976, where she spent most of her career, including as Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology. Laurie Glimcher has elucidated the molecular pathways that regulate the development and activation of cells in the immune system - pathways critical for both the development of protective immunity and for the pathophysiologic immune responses underlying autoimmune, infectious, allergic, and malignant diseases. She discovered the first Th1-specific transcription factor, T-bet, and demonstrated that it is the master-regulator of Type 1 immunity in cells of both the adaptive and innate immune system. She also discovered XBP1, the first transcription factor required for both plasma cell differentiation and the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress Response. She then demonstrated a link between ER stress and proinflammatory/autoimmune diseases. Most recently she discovered that XBP1 is key in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in triple negative breast cancer. Further, IRE1/XBP1 also controls anti-tumor immunity by disrupting dendritic cell homeostasis. Hence reducing IRE1/XBP1 activity should simultaneously inhibit tumor cell growth and activate type 1 anti-tumor immunity. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1996), the National Academy of Sciences (2002), and the American Association of Immunologists, (president, 2003-04). Laurie Glimcher was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
10Name:  Professor Annette Gordon-Reed
 Institution:  Harvard Law School; Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Annette Gordon-Reed is currently Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School and University Professor and Professor of History at Harvard University. She earned her J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1984. She has taught at a number of institutions, including as Wallace Stevens Professor of Law at New York Law School, Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University, and Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. In the vast library of Thomas Jefferson studies, few scholars have done more to challenge received wisdom than Gordon-Reed. Her first book challenged the dominant view that Jefferson could never have engaged in amorous relations with a woman of mixed African-American descent by carefully identifying the inherently racist and psychologically problematic claims that had long rejected this possibility. Gordon-Reed demonstrated that every source of evidence required equally scruplulous examination, and that the oral histories of the Hemings family were just as valuable than what turned out to be the contrived tales of later Jeffersons. The importance of that approach became evident after the 1998 publication of a study indicating that Hemings descendants were genetically linked to the male Jefferson line. Building on that finding, Gordon-Reed’s second book on The Hemingses of Monticello provided a reconstruction of this family’s life that was at once boldly imaginative yet again rigorously grounded in the evidence. The nuanced portrait of Jefferson that has in turn emerged from these two studies, and which is reflected in the book she recently co-authored with Peter Onuf, has made the field of Jefferson studies even more complicated. Annette Gordon-Reed has won a number of awards, including the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 2008, the Pulitzer Prize for History in 2009, a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010, and the National Humanities Medal in 2010. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, 2011. Her works include Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy (1998), Race on Trial: Law and Justice in American History (2002), The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (2008), Andrew Johnson (2011), with Peter S. Onuf "Most Blessed of the Patriarchs": Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination (2016), and On Juneteenth (2021). Annette Gordon-Reed was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
11Name:  Dr. Jennifer Higdon
 Institution:  Curtis Institute of Music
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1962
   
 
Jennifer Higdon was born on New Year’s Eve, 1962. She didn’t start playing an instrument until she taught herself to play the flute at the age of 15 and began formal studies at 18 when she entered college. Despite this late start, the Pulitzer Prize and two-time Grammy winner has become a major figure in Classical music, and is one of the few individuals in the U.S. who makes her living from commissions. Over the past two decades, Higdon has successfully broken the glass ceiling of Classical music, a musical form that has historically focused on the music of men, and even more restrictively, music from the 18th and 19th centuries. Higdon averages 200 performances a year of her works, in many genres within classical music: from opera to chamber, symphonic to band, solo works to concerti. She has even written works in forms not tackled before: a bluegrass/classical hybrid concerto, a concerto for the entire low brass section of the orchestra, and one that features 6 soloists. After receiving the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for her Violin Concerto, Higdon also won a Grammy for her Percussion Concerto...a singular feat which no other classical composer has ever managed: two of the biggest major awards for two different pieces in one year. Additionally, she has been awarded the prestigious Nemmers Prize in Music Composition from Northwestern University, the Guggenheim Fellowship, two awards from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Koussevitzky Foundation Fellowship, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, an Independence Foundation Grant, funding from the NEA, and ASCAP Awards. A winner of the Van Cliburn Piano Competition’s American Composers Invitational, her Secret & Glass Gardens was performed by the semi-finalists. Her first opera, Cold Mountain, sold out its premiere run in Santa Fe, as well as in North Carolina, and Philadelphia (becoming the third highest selling opera in Opera Philadelphia’s history). Cold Mountain won the prestigious International Opera Award for Best World Premiere in 2016; the first American opera to do so in the award’s history. Her music has been hailed by Fanfare Magazine as having "the distinction of being at once complex, sophisticated but readily accessible emotionally," with the Times of London citing it as "...traditionally rooted, yet imbued with integrity and freshness." The Chicago Sun Times recently cited her music as "both modern and timeless, complex and sophisticated, and immensely engaging in a way that both charms and galvanizes an audience craving something new and full of urgency, yet not distancing." John von Rhein of the Chicago Tribune called her writing, "beautiful, accessible, inventive, and impeccably crafted." Higdon's list of commissioners is extensive and includes The Philadelphia Orchestra, The Chicago Symphony, The Cleveland Orchestra, The Atlanta Symphony, the Munich Philharmonic and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, as well such groups as the Tokyo String Quartet, the Lark Quartet, Eighth Blackbird, and the President’s Own Marine Band. She has also written works for such renowned artists as baritone Thomas Hampson; pianists Yuja Wang and Gary Graffman; and violinists Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, Jennifer Koh, and Hilary Hahn. The demand for her music is such that there is a waiting list of soloists, orchestras and chamber groups who want to commission new works. Higdon has been a featured composer at many festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, Vail, Norfolk, Grand Teton, and Cabrillo. She has served as Composer-in-Residence with many orchestras, including the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Fort Worth Symphony. She was honored to serve as one of the Creative Directors of the Boundless Series for the Cincinnati Symphony. Higdon was honored to serve as the Barr Laureate Scholar at the University of Missouri Kansas City and, as winner of the Eddie Medora King Award, completed a residency at the University of Texas Austin. Her orchestral work, blue cathedral, is one of the most performed contemporary works in the orchestral repertoire, and is widely considered the first work in the 21st century to have become part of the standard repertoire. Higdon’s works have been recorded on more than 70 CDs. Her Percussion Concerto won the Grammy for Best Contemporary Classical Composition in 2010 and her Viola Concerto won in 2018. Her work, All Things Majestic, written for the Grand Teton Music Festival, is part of that national park’s visitor center experience. She received a Bachelor’s Degree in Music from Bowling Green State University, an Artist Diploma from The Curtis Institute of Music, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Higdon has been awarded honorary doctorates from the Hartt School and Bowling Green State University. Dr. Higdon currently holds the Rock Chair in Composition at The Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Her music is published exclusively by Lawdon Press.
 
12Name:  Dr. Martin Jay
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  303. History Since 1715
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Martin Jay is currently Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1971 before beginning his career at Berkeley. Martin Jay is his generation’s most respected and influential scholar of European intellectual history. His fifteen books are read not only by historians, but by artists, museum curators, literary scholars, and philosophers. Jay combines a deep understanding of theoretical questions – about vision, truth, totality, and experience – with an extraordinary ability to interpret in accessible language the answers to these questions articulated by French and German thinkers, whose prose many readers find obscure. Jay’s scholarship endures: a book of more than forty years ago, now translated into fourteen languages, remains the standard work on the Frankfurt School. He has trained more than thirty-five doctoral students, who now hold faculty appointments in many of the leading universities in the United States and Europe. He has welcomed scores of post-doctoral fellows to Berkeley. He regularly delivers invited lectures on every continent. His awards include the Herbert Baxter Adams Award of the American Historical Association in 1973 and the Scientific Prize for Distinction in Art History, the Cultural Sciences or the Human Sciences of the Aby-Warburg Foundation, Hamburg, in 2003. He is a member of the American Academy of Literary Studies (1986) and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1996). He is the author of: The Dialectical Imagination: A History of the Frankfurt School and the Institute of Social Research, 1923-50, 1973; Marxism and Totality: The Adventures of a Concept from Lukács to Habermas, 1984; Adorno, 1984; Permanent Exiles: Essays on the Intellectual Migration from Germany to America, 1985; Fin-de-Siècle Socialism and Other Essays, 1988; Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought, 1993; Force Fields: Between Intellectual History and Cultural Critique, 1993; Cultural Semantics: Keywords of Our Time, 1998; Refractions of Violence, 2003; Songs of Experience: Modern European and American Variations on a Universal Theme, 2004; The Virtues of Mendacity: On Lying in Politics, 2010; Reason After its Eclipse: On Late Critical Theory, 2016. Martin Jay was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
13Name:  Dr. Brian Joseph
 Institution:  Ohio State University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Brian Daniel Joseph is currently Distinguished University Professor, Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of Slavic Languages and Linguistics, Professor of Linguistics, at the Ohio State University. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1978 before beginning his career at Ohio State. Brian Joseph’s illuminating introductory paper from our Spring 2017 meeting (now published in Proceedings 162, 1) synthesized the issues in reconciling the linguistic and DNA-derived evidence of the peopling of Europe with languages of the Indo-European family. His own prodigious research and publication as an Indo-Europeanist and Balkanologist has centered on the prehistory and history of Greek over its 3500 years and its complex, now millennium-old relations to languages of the other families of the region, principally Albanian, South Slavic, and Turkish. Bringing to this work a profound mastery of contemporary morphological and syntactic theory, his scholarship has decisively rejuvenated linguists’ sense of the unique internal coherence of language as a grammatical structure, yet one ever adapting to the sometimes complex, multilingual social conditions that sustain it. He is the defining master in his generation of theoretically informed historical linguistics. Author or co-author of over 250 substantial journal articles and book chapters, of seven published books and 19 edited volumes or special journal issues, Joseph has also served the entire field of linguistics as editor of its flagship journal, Language. He is the author of: The Synchrony and Diachrony of the Balkan Infinitive: A Study in Areal, General, and Historical Linguistics, 1983 (reprint 2009); Morphology and Universals in Syntactic Change: Evidence from Medieval and Modern Greek, 1990; (with H. Hock) Language Change, Language History, and Language Relationship: An Introduction to Historical Linguistics, 1996; The Modern Greek Weak Subject Pronoun τος, 2015; (with P. Pappas) Modern Greek – A Grammatical Sketch, 2016; (with V. Friedman) The Balkan Languages, 2018. He has edited: (with P. Postal) Studies in Relational Grammar 3, 1990; (with R. Janda) Handbook of Historical Linguistics, 2003; (with A. Ralli, M. Janse) Studies in Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory, 2011. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2004), American Association for the Advancement of Science (2007), Linguistic Society of America (2010) (vice-president/president-elect, 2018). Brian Joseph was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
14Name:  Dr. Jonathan Lear
 Institution:  Universiy of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
Jonathan Lear is currently John U. Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought and Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University in 1978. He started his career in Clare College at University of Cambridge and moved to Yale University, including as Kingman Brewster Professor of the Humanities, before ending up at the University of Chicago. Jonathan Lear has, over the last twenty years, consistently been the leading defender of the philosophical dimensions of psychoanalytic theory, bringing out a level of sophistication and rigor in Freud’s thought often neglected in conventional criticisms. One might say that his major topic in a great deal of his work has been how to account for human irrationality in thought and action, and the bearing of the inescapable fact of irrationality on conceptions of how to live well. Both inside and outside philosophy he is probably best known for his extraordinary 2006 book, Radical Hope, on one level an investigation about how the Crow nation survived the dissolution of their traditional way of life, and on another level an exploration of what a collective form of life could be that it could “die out,” and what one might be called on to do in situations of potential cultural despair. His honors and awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987-88) and a Distinguished Achievement Award in the Humanities from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (2011-14). He is a member of American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2017). He has authored: Aristotle and Logical Theory, 1980, 2010; Aristotle: The Desire to Understand, 1988; Love and its Place in Nature: A Philosophical Interpretation of Freudian Psychoanalysis, 1990, 1999; Open Minded: Working Out The Logic of the Soul, 1998; Happiness, Death and the Remainder of Life, 2000; Therapeutic Action: An Earnest Plea for Irony, 2003; Freud, 2005, 2015; Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation, 2006; The Idea of a Philosophical Anthropology: The Spinoza Lectures, 2017; Wisdom Won From Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis, 2017. Jonathan Lear was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
15Name:  Mr. John Lithgow
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
John Lithgow is an actor and the founder of Arts First. He earned his B.A. from Harvard University in 1967. John Lithgow is one of the country’s most distinguished actors, and has been for decades. Trained as a Shakespearean actor, he is also accomplished on the stage in modern drama; in movies, in drama and comedy; and on television in roles ranging from an extraterrestrial to Winston Churchill. He is the author of an engrossing memoir, and has performed around the country in a one-man play derived in part from it. Deeply committed to arts education, he has written and recorded children’s books and has served on several commissions aimed at enhancing education in the arts. His alma mater, Harvard, has celebrated his accomplishments on many occasions, including with an honorary degree. His awards include: Best Featured Actor in a Play, 1973, Best Actor in a Musical, 2002, Tony Awards; Best Supporting Actor, Los Angeles Film Critics Association, 1982; Best Supporting Actor, New York Film Critics Association, 1982; Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series, 1986, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series, 1996, 1997, 1999, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series, 2010, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series, 2017, Primetime Emmy Awards; Best Actor - Television Series Musical or Comedy, 1997, Best Supporting Actor - Series, Miniseries, or Television Film, 2010, Golden Globes Awards; Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series, 1997, 1998, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series, 2017, Screen Actors Guild Awards; Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series, Critics Choice Awards, 2016; Harvard Arts Medal, 2017. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2010). He is the author of Drama: An Actor's Education (2011) and a number of children's books. John Lithgow was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
16Name:  Dr. Nancy Weiss Malkiel
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
Nancy Weiss Malkiel is professor of history emeritus at Princeton University. A scholar in 20th century American history, she joined the Princeton faculty as an assistant professor in 1969, was promoted to associate professor in 1975, and to full professor in 1982. She transferred to emeritus status in 2016. Professor Malkiel is the author most recently of "Keep the Damned Women Out": The Struggle for Coeducation (2016; paperback edition, 2018). Her previous publications (as Nancy J. Weiss) include Whitney M. Young, Jr., and the Struggle for Civil Rights (1989), Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Black Politics in the Age of FDR (1983), and The National Urban League, 1910-1940 (1974). She is currently working on a biography of William G. Bowen (1933-2016), president of Princeton University and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. From 1987 to 2011, Professor Malkiel served as Dean of the College, the senior officer responsible for Princeton's undergraduate academic program. She was the 2018 recipient of the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Sidney Hook Memorial Award, which recognizes national distinction in scholarship, undergraduate teaching, and leadership in the cause of liberal arts education. Professor Malkiel served from 1975 to 2019 as a trustee of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. As well, she is a former trustee of Smith College, Princeton Day School, and McCarter Theatre in Princeton. Professor Malkiel received a B.A. (1965) and an honorary degree (1997) from Smith College and an M.A. (1966) and Ph.D. (1970) from Harvard University.
 
17Name:  Dr. Roger B. Myerson
 Institution:  University of Chicago
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1951
   
 
Roger B. Myerson is currently David L. Pearson Distinguished Service Professor of Global Conflict Studies in the Harris School of Public Policy and Griffin Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. Prior to this he was Professor of Economics and Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor of Economics. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1976. Before moving to the University of Chicago he spent two and a half decades teaching at Northwestern University. Roger Myerson has made seminal contributions to the fields of economics and political science. In game theory, he introduced refinements of Nash’s equilibrium concept, and he developed techniques to characterize the effects of communication among rational agents who have different information. His analysis of incentive constraints in economic communication introduced fundamental concepts that are widely used in economic analysis, including the revelation principle and the revenue-equivalence theorem in auctions and bargaining. Myerson has also applied game-theoretic tools to political science, analyzing how political incentives can be affected by different electoral systems. He was awarded the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in recognition of his contributions to mechanism design theory, which analyzes rules for coordinating economic agents efficiently when they have different information and difficulty trusting each other. He has published op-ed pieces on democracy in Iraq and on how America should respond to the Ukraine crisis. In addition to his Nobel Prize, he has won the Jean-Jacques Laffont Prize (Toulouse) in 2009 and the Oskar Morganstern Medal of the University of Vienna in 2013. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (council, vice president, 1999-2002), The Econometric Society (president, 2009), the National Academy of Sciences, 2009, and The Game Theory Society (president, 2012-14). He is the author of Game Theory: Analysis of Conflict (1991), Probability Models for Economic Decisions (2005), and Force and Restraint in Strategic Deterrence: A Game Theorist’s Perspective (2007). Roger Myerson was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
18Name:  Dr. Naomi Oreskes
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1958
   
 
Naomi Oreskes is Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. She is an internationally renowned geologist, science historian, and author of both scholarly and popular books and articles on the history of earth and environmental science, including The Rejection of Continental Drift, Plate Tectonics: An Insider’s History of the Modern Theory of the Earth, and in recent decades has been a leading voice on the issue of anthropogenic climate change. Her research focuses on the earth and environmental sciences, with a particular interest in understanding scientific consensus and dissent. Her 2004 essay "The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change" (Science 306: 1686) has been widely cited, both in the United States and abroad, including in the Royal Society’s publication, "A Guide to Facts and Fictions about Climate Change," in the Academy-award winning film, An Inconvenient Truth. She is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow. https://histsci.fas.harvard.edu/people/naomi-oreskes
 
19Name:  Dr. Fernando Pereira
 Institution:  Google Inc.
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  107
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1956
   
 
Fernando Pereira is VP and Engineering Fellow at Google, where he leads research and development in natural language understanding and machine learning. His previous positions include chair of the Computer and Information Science department of the University of Pennsylvania, head of the Machine Learning and Information Retrieval department at AT&T Labs, and research and management positions at SRI International. He received a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and has over 120 research publications on computational linguistics, machine learning, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and logic programming, as well as several patents. He was elected AAAI Fellow in 1991 for contributions to computational linguistics and logic programming, ACM Fellow in 2010 for contributions to machine learning models of natural language and biological sequences, and ACL Fellow for contributions to sequence modeling, finite-state methods, and dependency and deductive parsing. He was president of the Association for Computational Linguistics in 1993. In 2020 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Fernando Pereira was elected a member of the Americal Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
20Name:  Mr. David M. Rubenstein
 Institution:  The Carlyle Group
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
David M. Rubenstein is Co-Founder and Co-Chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest and most successful private investment firms. Established in 1987, Carlyle now manages $276 billion from 27 offices around the world. Mr. Rubenstein is Chairman of the Boards of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Economic Club of Washington; a Fellow of the Harvard Corporation; a Trustee of the National Gallery of Art, the University of Chicago, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Institute for Advanced Study, the National Constitution Center, the Brookings Institution, and the World Economic Forum; and a Director of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, among other board seats. Mr. Rubenstein is a leader in the area of Patriotic Philanthropy, having made transformative gifts for the restoration or repair of the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Monticello, Montpelier, Mount Vernon, Arlington House, Iwo Jima Memorial, the Kennedy Center, the Smithsonian, the National Archives, the National Zoo, the Library of Congress, and the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Mr. Rubenstein has also provided to the U.S. government long-term loans of his rare copies of the Magna Carta, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Emancipation Proclamation, the 13th Amendment, the first map of the U.S. (Abel Buell map), and the first book printed in the U.S. (Bay Psalm Book). Mr. Rubenstein is an original signer of The Giving Pledge; the host of The David Rubenstein Show and Bloomberg Wealth with David Rubenstein; and the author of The American Story and How to Lead. David Rubenstein was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019.
 
Election Year
2019[X]
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