American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
Resident[X]
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
401. Archaeology (2)
404a (2)
404b (1)
404c (1)
407. Philosophy (1)
1Name:  Dr. Svetlana Alpers
 Institution:  New York University; University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Svetlana Alpers is an art historian, critic, and artist. She was born in Cambridge, Mass., studied History and Literature at Radcliffe, turning from text to image for a PhD. In Fine Arts. She studied briefly with Richard Krautheimer at the IFA in New York, then formatively with the visiting E.H. Gombrich at Harvard and taught at the University of California, Berkeley from 1962-94. She published on Flemish art before turning to Dutch art with The Art of Describing, with books on Rembrandt, Rubens, Tiepolo (with Michael Baxandall) and on the Vexations of Art: Velazquez and Others. She was a founding editor of Representations. A group of photographic prints after Tiepolo from the series "Painting then for now" (with James Hyde and Barney Kulok) is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
 
2Name:  Dr. Jed Z. Buchwald
 Institution:  California Institute of Technology
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404c
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Jed Z. Buchwald is Doris and Henry Dreyfuss Professor of History at the Californnia Institute of Technology. He is married to Diana Kormos Buchwald, who is also a professor at Caltech, where she is Director and General Editor of the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Awarded a five-year MacArthur Fellowship in 1995, Buchwald was trained at Princeton (BA ’71) and Harvard (Ph.D ’74.) From 1974 to 1992 he taught at the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and. From 1992 to 2001 he was at MIT as Dibner Professor of the History of Science, where he also directed the Dibner Institute. Buchwald has authored or co-authored five books and seven edited volumes on the history of science and related matters. His most recent two are The Zodiac of Paris, with Diane Greco Josefowicz and (recently completed) Reckoning with the Past: Isaac Newton, Ancient Chronicles and the Temper of Evidence, with Mordechai Feingold. His editorial activities include: co-editor with Jeremy Gray, Archive for History of Exact Sciences; editor, Archimedes New Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (Kluwer-Springer); managing editor, Studies and Sources in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (Springer); editor, Transformations Studies in the History of Science and Technology (MIT); he serves on the advisory board of several other journals. At Caltech Buchwald teaches courses in ancient civilization, religion and in the history of physics.
 
3Name:  Dr. Natalie Zemon Davis
 Institution:  University of Toronto; Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1928
   
 
Natalie Zemon Davis is a social and cultural historian of early modern times. She has written on peasants and artisans in early modern France; on women in Germany, France, the Netherlands and Québec; on criminality and storytelling in sixteenth-century France; on forms of gift-giving in early modern times; and on Muslims and Christians in sixteenth-century Europe. She is the author of eight books, all of them translated into various foreign languages: Society and Culture in Early Modern France; The Return of Martin Guerre (she was also historical consultant for the film Le Retour de Martin Guerre); Fiction in the Archives: Pardon Tales in Sixteenth-Century France; Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives; The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France; Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision; A Passion for History. Conversations with Denis Crouzet; Trickster Travels. A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds. Together with Arlette Farge, she was coeditor of volume 3 (Renasisssance and Enlightenment Paradoxes) of A History of Women, edited by Michelle Perrot and Georges Duby. She has taught at the University of Toronto, the University of California at Berkeley, and Princeton University, where she was Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and Director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies. A former president of the American Historical Association and vice-president of the International Commission of Historical Sciences, she is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a corresponding fellow of the British Academy, and Chevalier de l’Ordre des Palmes Académique. She is the recipient of various prizes (including the 2010 Ludwig Holberg International Prize and the 2012 National Humanities Medal) and honorary degrees, including from Harvard University, the University of Toronto, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Cambridge University, Université de Lyon, Université de Toulouse, and Oxford University. Emerita from Princeton University, Natalie Zemon Davis is currently Adjunct Professor of History and Anthropology, Professor of Medieval Studies, and Senior Fellow in Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Her present research is on slavery and forms of sociability in 18th-century Suriname, including the study of a slave family over four generations and of a Jewish settler family over six generations. She was awarded the 2014 Gold Medal in History from the Amercian Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
4Name:  Dr. Paul Freedman
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404b
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Paul Freedman is Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale and was chair of the Department from 2004 to 2007. In 2010-2011 he was acting chair. His field is medieval Europe and he has written on Spain, the church, peasants and most recently on food and luxury products in the Middle Ages. Freedman has taught in the freshman Directed Studies (Great Books) program at Yale and offered courses in the Humanities Department. His History Department courses include lectures on the Middle Ages, a course on the history of food and cuisine, and seminars and a number of topics from the Crusades to the European ideas about Asia and Africa. Graduating from the Santa Cruz campus of the University of California, Freedman received his Ph.D. from Berkeley in 1978. He taught at Vanderbilt University from 1979 until 1997 when he came to Yale. He has received research fellowships from the Cullman Center of the New York Public Library, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as from government cultural agencies in Spain, France and Germany. Freedman is the author of several books on medieval Spain, including The Diocese of Vic (1983) and The Origins of Peasant Servitude in Medieval Catalonia (1992). In 1999 he published Images of the Medieval Peasant which deals with Europe generally and how the vast majority of medieval society were depicted in literature, art and sermons. Yale University Press in 2008 published Freedman’s book Out of the East: Spices and the Medieval Imagination which considers why spices were so popular in the Middle Ages as to become major items of trade and the stimulus to exploration of Asia and the New World. In 2007 Freedman edited Food: The History of Taste, a book about cuisine from prehistoric hunter-gathers until the present-day trends. His recent books include American Cuisine and How It Got That Way (2019).
 
5Name:  Dr. Carol Greenhouse
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  407. Philosophy
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Carol J. Greenhouse is a cultural anthropologist specializing in the anthropology of law and politics, with primary interests in the United States. A graduate of Harvard University (A.B. Anthropology, Ph.D. Social Anthropology), she taught at Cornell and Indiana-Bloomington prior to joining the anthropology faculty at Princeton, where she has remained, entering emeritus status in 2019. She has held the chair (visiting) in American Civilization at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and is past president of the Law & Society Association and the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology; she is also former editor of American Ethnologist. Her books include Praying for Justice: Faith, Hope and Community in an America Town, A Moment's Notice: Time Politics Across Cultures, Law and Community in Three American Towns (with David Engel and Barbara Yngvesson; winner of the Law & Society Association book prize), The Relevance of Paradox: Ethnography and Citizenship in the United States and edited volumes Ethnography and Democracy: Constructing Identity in Multicultural Liberal States, Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Social Change (co-edited with Elizabeth Mertz and Kay Warren) and Ethnographies of Neoliberalism. In 2011, she was co-winner of the Law & Society Association's Kalven Prize. She is married to Alfred C. Aman, Jr., Roscoe C. O'Byrne Professor of Law and former dean at Indiana University's Maurer School of Law, Bloomington.
 
6Name:  Dr. Susan D. Gubar
 Institution:  Indiana University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1944
   
 
A literary and cultural critic, Susan Gubar is Ruth Halls Professor and Distinguished Professor Emerita at Indiana University. With co-author Sandra M. Gilbert, she published The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the 19th-Century Literary Imagination in 1979 (Yale University Press), a finalist for both The Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. The project was the beginning of many collaborative projects between the two, who together won a 1985 Ms. Woman of the Year award for their compilation of the Norton Anthology of Literature of Women. They also co-authored a critical trilogy titled No Man's Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century--The War of the Words (1988), Sexchanges (1989), and Letters from the Front (1994); a collection of poetry for and about mothers, MotherSongs (Norton, 1995); and a satire on the current state of literacy and cultural literacy, Masterpiece Theatre: An Academic Melodrama (Rutgers, 1995). Gubar’s subsequent books include Racechanges: White Skin, Black Face in American Culture (Oxford, 1997); a compilation of essays, Critical Condition: Feminism at the Turn of the Century (Columbia, 2000); and Poetry After Auschwitz: Remembering What One Never Knew (Indiana, 2003), the product of her year as a Laurence S. Rockefeller Fellow at Princeton University's Center for Human Values. In 2005, she published the first annotated edition of Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own in the States (Harcourt Brace). In 2006, her book Rooms of Our Own (Illinois) won an Honorable Mention award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, and in 2007, with Gilbert, she published a third edition of the Norton Anthology of Literature by Women as well as a Norton Reader of Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism. Her cultural biography of Judas (Norton, 2009), the twelfth apostle, was listed in Magill’s Literary Annual as one of the best books of 2009. She recently wrote Memoir of a Debulked Woman: Ending Ovarian Cancer in 2012. The recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation, Gubar was the 2003 recipient of The Faculty Mentor Award from IU's Graduate Professional Student Organization and received the 2010 President's Medal for Excellence, among the highest honors an IU president can bestow. Currently, she has completed the editing of True Confessions: Feminist Professors Tell Stories Out of School (forthcoming from Norton), a collection of autobiographical essays by the first generation of women to integrate the study of gender into such disciplines as philosophy, art history, comparative literature, religion, psychology, anthropology, and African American studies.
 
7Name:  Dr. Richard L. Kagan
 Institution:  Johns Hopkins University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Richard L. Kagan is Arthur O. Lovejoy Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University where he has been a member of the faculty since 1972. A graduate of Columbia University (BA, 1965) and Cambridge University (Ph.D., 1968), Professor Kagan has also taught at Indiana University, the Autonomous University of Madrid, the University of Barcelona, the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and Ecole de Hautes Etudes et Sciences Sociales in Paris. His grants include awards from the American Philosophical Society, the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Association, the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Getty Grant Committee, etc. He has been a visiting fellow at the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies (Princeton University), Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Washington, DC. Specializing in the history of early modern Europe, especially that of Spain and its overseas empire, his major publications include Students and Society in Early Modern Spain (Johns Hopkins, 1974); Lawsuits and Litigants in Castile, 1500-1700 (North Carolina, 1981); Lucrecia's Dreams: Politics and Prophecy in Sixteenth-Century Spain (California, 1990); and Urban Images of the Hispanic World, 1493-1793 (Yale, 2000). He is also the editor of Spanish Cities of the Golden Age: The Views of Anton van den Wyngaerde (California, 1989); (with Geoffrey Parker) Spain, Europe and the Atlantic World (Cambridge, 1995); Spain and America: The Origins of Hispanism in the United States (Illinois, 2002); (with Abby Dyer) Inquisitorial Inquiries: The Brief Lives of Secret Jews and other Heretics (2004); (with Philip Morgan) Atlantic Diasporas: Jews, Conversos, and Crypto-Jews in the Age of Mercantilism (2008); and Clio and the Crown: The Politics of History in Medieval and Early Modern Spain (2009). Other publications include articles in the American Historical Review, Art Bulletin, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Past and Present, Rivista Historica Italiana, Società e Storia, Studies in the History of Art, Studia Historica, etc. He has also contributed essays to several exhibition catalogues, notably El Greco of Toledo (National Gallery of Art, 1982) Circa 1492 (National Gallery of Art, 1992), Spain in the Age of Exploration, 1492-1819 (Seattle Art Museum, 2004), and Nueva York, an exhibition sponsored by the New York Historical Society and the Museo del Barrio (2010). Professor Kagan's current research focuses on artistic and cultural relations between the United States and the wider Hispanic world. His recent publications in this area include "The Spanish Craze in the United States: Cultural Entitlement and the Appropriation of Spain's Cultural Patrimony, ca. 1890 - ca. 1930," Revista Complutense de Historia de American 36 (2010), 37-58, and "Blame it on Washington Irving: New York's Discovery of the Art and Architecture of Spain," Nueva York: 1613-1945, ed. Edward Sullivan, (New York, New York Historical Society, and Scala, 2010), 155-171.
 
Election Year
2011[X]