American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
Resident (2)
Class
5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs[X]
Subdivision
501. Creative Artists[X]
1Name:  Mr. Yo-Yo Ma
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
The many-faceted career of cellist Yo-Yo Ma is testament to his continual search for new ways to communicate with audiences, and to his personal desire for artistic growth and renewal. Whether performing a new concerto, revisiting a familiar work from the cello repertoire, coming together with colleagues for chamber music or exploring musical forms outside of the Western classical tradition, Mr. Ma strives to find connections that stimulate the imagination. Yo-Yo Ma maintains a balance between his engagements as soloist with orchestras throughout the world and his recital and chamber music activities. He draws inspiration from a wide circle of collaborators, each fueled by the artists' interactions. One of Mr. Ma's goals is the exploration of music as a means of communication and as a vehicle for the migrations of ideas across a range of cultures throughout the world. Expanding upon this interest, in 1998 Mr. Ma established the Silk Road Project to promote the study of the cultural, artistic and intellectual traditions along the ancient Silk Road trade route that stretched from the Mediterranean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. By examining the flow of ideas throughout this vast area, the Project seeks to illuminate the heritages of the Silk Road countries and identify the voices that represent these traditions today. The Project's major activities have included the 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, which included more than 400 artists from 25 countries and drew more than 1.3 million visitors, concerts at the 2005 World Expo in Aichi, Japan, and Silk Road Chicago, a city-wide year-long residency in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the City of Chicago. Mr. Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble performed at the Opening Ceremony of the 2007 Special Olympics in Shanghai. Continuing over the next few years, in collaboration with leading museums in Asia, Europe and North America, the Project will co-produce a series of performance, exhibition and educational events focusing on great works of art from each museum's collections. Mr. Ma is an exclusive Sony Classical artist, and his discography of over 75 albums (including more than 15 Grammy Award winners) reflects his wide-ranging interests. He has made several successful recordings that defy categorization, among them "Hush" with Bobby McFerrin, "Appalachia Waltz" and "Appalachian Journey" with Mark O'Connor and Edgar Meyer and two Grammy-winning tributes to the music of Brazil, "Obrigado Brazil" and "Obrigado Brazil - Live in Concert." Mr. Ma's most recent recordings include "Paris: La Belle Époque," with pianist Kathryn Stott, and "New Impossibilities," a live album recorded with the Silk Road Ensemble and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra; he also appears on John Williams' soundtrack for Rob Marshall's film "Memoirs of a Geisha." Across this full range of releases Mr. Ma remains one of the best-selling recording artists in the classical field. All of his recent albums have quickly entered the Billboard chart of classical best sellers, remaining in the Top 15 for extended periods, often with as many as four titles simultaneously on the list. Yo-Yo Ma is strongly committed to educational programs that not only bring young audiences into contact with music but also allow them to participate in its creation. While touring, he takes time whenever possible to conduct master classes as well as more informal programs for students, musicians and non-musicians alike. He has also reached young audiences through appearances on "Arthur," "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" and "Sesame Street." Yo-Yo Ma was born in 1955 to Chinese parents living in Paris. He began to study the cello with his father at age four and soon came with his family to New York, where he spent most of his formative years. Later, his principal teacher was Leonard Rose at the Juilliard School. He sought out a traditional liberal arts education to expand upon his conservatory training, graduating from Harvard University in 1976. He has received numerous awards, including the Avery Fisher Prize (1978), the Glenn Gould Prize (1999), the National Medal of the Arts (2001), the Dan David Prize (2006), the Sonning Prize (2006), the World Economic Forum's Crystal Award (2008), the 2010 Medal of Freedom, the 2015 Antonin Dvorak Prize, and the 2016 Getty Medal. In 2006, then Secretary General Kofi Annan named him a United Nations Messenger of Peace. In 2007, Secretary General Ban Ki-moon extended his appointment. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra brought him aboard as a Creative Consultant in 2009. Mr. Ma and his wife have two children. Mr. Ma plays two instruments, a 1733 Montagnana cello from Venice and the 1712 Davidoff Stradivarius.
 
2Name:  Mr. Frank Stella
 Year Elected:  1999
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
One of the most significant abstract painters of the last fifty years, Frank Stella is an important figure in minimalism, post-painterly abstraction and offset lithography (a technique he devised). After studying history at Princeton University, he began work in 1958 on a series of strikingly sombre and intelligent paintings known as the black paintings. The Museum of Modern Art recognized the power of these paintings, which addressed themselves simultaneously to the empirical limitations of the flat space of paintings and the temporal extent of human life. Soon after this work was recognized with a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, his restrained style was unleashed in a series of paintings that broke open the pictorial surface, appearing now as large 3-dimensional planes of aluminum. Painted in bright colors, these paintings launched a novel investigation of pictorial space that was uniquely recognized by a second retrospective. In 1983, in recognition of Stella's interest in aesthetic theory, he delivered the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard. In recent years he has taken on large-scale projects for public spaces and has received architectural commissions. He was presented with the John Singleton Copley Award in 2012 and the National Artists Award of the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in 2015.
 
Election Year
1999[X]