American Philosophical Society
Member History

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1Name:  Dr. May-Britt Moser
 Institution:  Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  208. Plant Sciences
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1963
   
 
May-Britt Moser is a Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Centre for Neural Computation at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. She is interested in the neural basis of spatial location and spatial specifically and cognition more generally. Her work, conducted with Edvard Moser as a long-term collaborator, includes the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex. The discovery of grid cells was succeeded by identification of other functional cell types, including head direction cells, conjunctive cells and border cells and collectively the findings point to the entorhinal cortex as a hub for the brain network that makes us find our way. May-Britt Moser received her initial training at the University of Oslo under the supervision of Dr. Per Andersen. She worked as a post-doc with Richard Morris and John O’Keefe in 1996, before she accepted a faculty position at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She became a Co-Director of the Centre for the Biology of Memory in 2002 and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in 2007. In 2012, she was appointed Director of the newly established Centre for Neural Computation. Together with Edvard Moser, she has received a number of awards, including the 2014 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology.
 
2Name:  Dr. Edvard Moser
 Institution:  Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  2. Biological Sciences
 Subdivision:  208. Plant Sciences
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1962
   
 
Edvard Moser is a Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. He is interested in how spatial location and spatial memory are computed in the brain. His work, conducted with May-Britt Moser as a long-term collaborator, includes the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, which provides clues to a neural mechanism for the metric of spatial mapping. Subsequent to this discovery the Mosers have identified additional space-representing cell types in the entorhinal cortex and they are beginning to unravel how the neural microcircuit is organized. Edvard Moser received his initial training at the University of Oslo under the supervision of Dr. Per Andersen. He worked as a post-doc with Richard Morris and John O’Keefe in 1996, before he accepted a faculty position at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology the same year. In 2002 he became the Founding Director of the Centre for the Biology of Memory. In 2007 the Centre became a Kavli Institute. Edvard Moser is also Co-Director of the newly established Centre for Neural Computation at the same institution. Together with May-Britt Moser, he has received a number of awards, including the 2014 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology.
 
3Name:  Mr. Richard Ovenden
 Institution:  Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1964
   
 
Richard Ovenden is Bodley’s Librarian, the 25th person to hold the title, which is the senior executive position of the Bodleian Libraries. His previous roles include positions at the House of Lords Library, the National Library of Scotland and at the University of Edinburgh, where he was Director of Collections, responsible for integrating the Library, the University Museums and Art Gallery. In 2003 he became Keeper of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts, followed by Associate Director, and latterly (from 2011) Deputy Librarian, at the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford. At the Bodleian he is also Director of the Bodleian's Centre for the Study of the Book and holds a Professorial Fellowship at Balliol College. He is professionally active in the sphere of libraries, archives and information science, being a member of the Board of the Legal Deposit Libraries, the Board of Research Libraries UK, and serves as President of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) 2009- 13. He is a Trustee of Chawton House Library, and of the Kraszna Kraus Foundation. Richard is author of John Thomson (1837-1921): photographer (1997), a major study of the Scottish photographer, and writes on the history of libraries, the history of the book, and the history of photography. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries.
 
4Name:  Dr. Tim Palmer
 Institution:  Jesus College, University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences
 Subdivision:  105. Physical Earth Sciences
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1952
   
 
Tim Palmer is a Royal Society Research Professor in Climate Physics at the University of Oxford. Tim’s doctoral research was in general relativity where he formulated the first quasi-local expressions for gravitational energy momentum in generic space times. After his PhD, he moved into weather and climate research. Amongst his research achievements, he discovered the world’s largest breaking waves (in the stratosphere) and established the role of Atlantic ocean variability as a causal factor for long-term drought in the African Sahel. Tim worked at the UK Met Office and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather forecasts where he pioneered studies to quantify the predictability of the climate system, leading the group which developed operational ensemble-based probabilistic weather and climate prediction in the medium, monthly and seasonal timescales. On returning to Oxford in 2010, Tim’s research interests have included the development of stochastic parametrisation in weather and climate models, and the application of ideas in inexact computing for high-resolution weather and climate prediction. He continued his work on fundamental physics developing deterministic methods based on topological models of the p-adic integers, to reformulate quantum theory as a realistic locally causal theory. Tim contributed to all five IPCC Working Group One assessment reports and led two European Union Climate Projects. He has won the top prizes of the American Meteorological Society and the European Meteorological Society, and won the Dirac Gold Medal of the Institute of Physics, for his work on probabilistic weather and climate prediction. He does a considerable amount of outreach work both on climate change, and on chaos theory. He was elected to the Royal Society in 2003 and was President of the Royal Meteorological Society from 2010-2012. In 2015 he became Commander of the British Empire as part of the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List. In 2019 was elected an international honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2020 was elected an international member of the US National Academy of Sciences. Tim Palmer was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2015.
 
5Name:  Dr. Thomas Piketty
 Institution:  École des hautes études en sciences socials; Paris School of Economics
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1971
   
 
Thomas Piketty is the author of numerous articles published in journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Political Economy, the American Economic Review and the Review of Economic Studies, and of a dozen books. He has done major historical and theoretical work on the interplay between economic development and the distribution of income and wealth. In particular, he is the initiator of the recent literature on the long run evolution of top income shares in national income (now available in the World Top Incomes Database). He is also the author of Capital in the 21st Century. These works have led to radically question the optimistic relationship between development and inequality posited by Kuznets, and to emphasize the role of political and fiscal institutions in the historical evolution of income and wealth distribution.
 
6Name:  Dame Anne Salmond
 Institution:  University of Auckland
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Anne Salmond is New Zealand’s most eminent scholar in social anthropology, ethnohistory, and Maori studies. Her research draws on structural linguistics, semantic anthropology, long-term ethnographic fieldwork at Maori ceremonial gatherings, and documentary and oral historical techniques, all used to establish key principles that have structured Maori and other Pacific peoples’ economics, social organization, rituals, and maintenance of group identity over the long course of encounters with European explorers and settlers in their cultural worlds. A public intellectual in the best sense of that term, Salmond is one of a small number of social scientists whose work can be truly said to have shaped thinking about the structure and nature of social and cultural relationships in New Zealand and the wider Pacific. Out of her studies of Maori and Pacific philosophies and ways of living engaged by European Enlightenment science and philosophies, and their Pacific legacies, she has awakened interest in new ways of resolving how cutting edge science can address environmental issues and issues of ecological restoration. Her latest work is Tears of Rangi: Exeriments Across Worlds (2017).
 
7Name:  Lord Nicholas Stern
 Institution:  London School of Economics; British Academy
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  302. Economics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Professor Stern is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at the London School of Economics. He is President of the British Academy (from July 2013), and was elected Fellow of the Royal Society (June 2014). Professor Stern has held academic appointments in the UK at Oxford, Warwick and the LSE and abroad including at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Ecole Polytechnique and the Collège de France in Paris, the Indian Statistical Institute in Bangalore and Delhi, and the People’s University of China in Beijing. He was Chief Economist of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 1994-1999, and Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank, 2000-2003. He was Second Permanent Secretary to Her Majesty’s Treasury from 2003-2005; Director of Policy and Research for the Prime Minister’s Commission for Africa from 2004-2005; Head of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change, published in 2006; and Head of the Government Economic Service from 2003-2007. He was knighted for services to economics in 2004 and made a cross-bench life peer as Baron Stern of Brentford in 2007. He has published more than 15 books and 100 articles and his most recent book is Why are We Waiting? The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change. He holds 12 honorary degrees and has received the Blue Planet Prize (2009), the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award (2010), the Leontief Prize (2010), and the Schumpeter Award (2015), amongst many others.
 
Election Year
2015[X]