American Philosophical Society
Member History

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81Name:  Dr. Pierre Rosenberg
 Institution:  Musée du Louvre
 Year Elected:  1997
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
After a distinguished career in a series of posts as conservateur at the Louvre Museum as well as Inspector General of France's museums, Pierre Rosenberg became President and Director of the Louvre in 1994. By then he had acquired international prestige as a specialist in French painting and drawing of the 17th and 18th centuries. Among his many books, works on Poussin, Chardin, and Fragonard have become classics in the field. He is the author of catalogues of the drawings of important painters such as Poussin, Watteau and David, as well as of public and private collections of art. He has participated in colloquia, congresses, and round tables throughout the world. He was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) in 1977 and has been chairman of the French Committee on the History of Art. Dr. Rosenberg has been widely recognized for his achievements in art history, conservation, curatorship, and administration. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1990, to the Italian Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in 1995, and to the American Philosophical Society in 1997. In 1995 he joined the ranks of the "immortals" of France when he was elected to the Académie française. He is an Officier of the French Légion d'honneur. In 2001 he retired as President and Director of the Louvre.
 
82Name:  Dr. Erika Rummel
 Institution:  University of Toronto; Wilfrid Laurier University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1942
   
 
Erika Rummel began as an Erasmus scholar and made herself the best and most productive one in the world today. Then she looked at the broader field of northern humanism, including Spain, and especially the relationship between humanism and the Reformation. She has brought fresh eyes, openness, even a sense of humor to a stagnant field. One has to read her books to appreciate fully that she tackles important topics, has keen curiosity, great analytical intelligence, and impeccable linguistic skills. Dr. Rummel has made the study of Renaissance humanism outside of Italy lively and fun again. A native of Austria, Dr. Rummel earned her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto (1976) and has been a member of the faculty at Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario since 1992. She has held the title of Professor Emerita since 2002.
 
83Name:  Hon. Sir Steven Runciman
 Institution:  Trinity College, Cambridge & British Academy
 Year Elected:  1965
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1903
 Death Date:  November 1, 2000
   
84Name:  Dame Anne Salmond
 Institution:  University of Auckland
 Year Elected:  2015
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Anne Salmond is New Zealand’s most eminent scholar in social anthropology, ethnohistory, and Maori studies. Her research draws on structural linguistics, semantic anthropology, long-term ethnographic fieldwork at Maori ceremonial gatherings, and documentary and oral historical techniques, all used to establish key principles that have structured Maori and other Pacific peoples’ economics, social organization, rituals, and maintenance of group identity over the long course of encounters with European explorers and settlers in their cultural worlds. A public intellectual in the best sense of that term, Salmond is one of a small number of social scientists whose work can be truly said to have shaped thinking about the structure and nature of social and cultural relationships in New Zealand and the wider Pacific. Out of her studies of Maori and Pacific philosophies and ways of living engaged by European Enlightenment science and philosophies, and their Pacific legacies, she has awakened interest in new ways of resolving how cutting edge science can address environmental issues and issues of ecological restoration. Her latest work is Tears of Rangi: Exeriments Across Worlds (2017).
 
85Name:  Dr. Peter Schäfer
 Institution:  Princeton University & Freie Universität, Berlin
 Year Elected:  1997
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Peter Schäfer is the Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor of Religion at Princeton University and concurrently holds the chair of Jewish Studies at the Free University of Berlin. He was a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Oxford, Jerusalem and Yale, at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York and at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. In addition to the American Philosophical Society, he is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and holds an honorary degree (Dr. theol.) from the University of Utrecht, Netherlands. In 1994 he was awarded the Leibniz Prize of 1.5 Million German Mark, the highest award for German scholars. In 2013 he received Princeton University's Howard T. Behrman Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities. Peter Schäfer has published extensively about rabbinic literature and history, early Jewish mysticism, and Wissenschaft des Judentums. He edited the corpus of Hekhalot literature, the Talmud Yerushalmi and (with Sh. Shaked) magical texts from the Cairo Geniza. His most recent books are Judeophobia: Attitudes toward the Jews in the Ancient World, Cambridge, Mass. & London: Harvard University Press, 1997 (paperback edition 1998), Mirror of His Beauty: Feminine Images of God from the Bible to the Early Kabbalah, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002 (paperback 2004) and (as editor) The Bar Kokhba War Reconsidered: New Perspectives on the Second Jewish Revolt against Rome, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2003.
 
86Name:  Dr. Eva Schlotheuber
 Institution:  Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf; German Historical Association
 Year Elected:  2020
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
 
Eva Schlotheuber's enthusiasm for medieval manuscripts, art and literature started at Göttingen, studying with Hartmut Hoffmann, one of the leading scholars of manuscript and archival studies. A year abroad in Copenhagen reading anthropology and experimental archaeology added to this the material side of history and environmental studies. Working at the intersection of these disciplines has never ceased to fascinate her and she has continued working on little known primary material and hidden archival sources from an interdisciplinary perspective. A particular focus has been how religious orders structure and communicate knowledge, particularly looking at how religious women staked out their claim in medieval society; she has worked closely with colleagues around the world, among them Jeffrey Hamburger (Art History, Harvard) and Margot Fassler (Musicology/Liturgy, Notre Dame). Currently, she is editing together with Henrike Lähnemann (German Studies, Oxford) what is probably the largest corpus of medieval writing by women, 1.800 letters collected in a Northern German convent (The Nuns' Network). A second area of research revolves round the influence which poets and humanists such as Dante and Petrarch had on political theory and governance structure in the 14th century, and how new collective norms are formed in times of crisis. The critical evaluation and contextualisation of sources of all kind is a particular strength of medieval studies which is crucial in understanding how systems of knowledge are changing. We can build upon this highly developed source critizism for meeting the challenges of our networked digital age. This is a challenge which can only be met by working together across the Humanities and Sciences and jointly developing a vision for the future which is collaborative. Eva Schlotheuber was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2020.
 
87Name:  Dr. Salvatore Settis
 Institution:  Scuola Normale Superiore
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
Salvatore Settis has been Director of the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (1994-1999) and of the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (1999-2010), where he also taught Classical Archaeology and Art History. He has been Visiting Professor in several universities; moreover, he delivered the Isaia Berlin Lectures at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, the Mellon Lectures at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, and the Lectures of the Catedra del Museo del Prado in Madrid. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Rome, of the Institut de France, of the Istituto Veneto, and of the Academies of Sciences in Berlin, Munich, Brussells, and Turin. His research interests include ancient and Renaissance art history. Among his books: Saggio sull'Afrodite Urania di Fidia , Pisa 1966; La «Tempesta» interpretata. Giorgione, i committenti, il soggetto , Turin 1978 [English: Giorgione's Tempest. Interpreting the Hidden Subject , Cambridge 1990] ; La Colonna Traiana , Turin 1988; Laocoonte. Fama e stile , Rome 1999; Italia S.p.A. L’assalto al patrimonio culturale , Turin 2002; Futuro del Classico, Turin 2004 [English: The Future of the Classical, Oxford 2006]; Battaglie senza eroi. I beni culturali fra istituzioni e profitto, Milan 2005; Artisti e committenti fra Quattro e Cinquecento, Turin 2010; Paesaggio Costituzione cemento. La battaglia per l’ambiente contro il degrado civile, Turin 2011. He was editor of Memoria dell'Antico nell'arte italiana, vols. 1-3, Turin 1984-86, of I Greci. Storia, arte, cultura, società, vols. 1-6, Turin 1995-2002, and of The Classical Tradition , Harvard University Press 2010 (with A. Grafton and G. W. Most), and is the general editor of the series Mirabilia Italiae. For his interest in the preservation of landscape and cultural heritage, he has been Chair of Italy’s High Council for Cultural Heritage and Landscape (“Consiglio Superiore dei Beni Culturali e Paesaggistici”) and was awarded two honorary degrees in Law, by the universities of Padua (2007) and Rome-Tor Vergata (2008).
 
88Name:  Dr. Moshe Sharon
 Institution:  The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1937
   
 
Moshe Sharon, M.A., PhD was born in Haifa Israel on December 18, 1937 and received his higher education at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the SOAS University of London. He is a professor (Emeritus) of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies, and Chair in Bahá’í Studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in which he initiated the scholarly independent study of the Bahá’í Faith (in a non Bahá’í context, and within the wider study of modern religions and religious movements). Asked in 1984 to develop Jewish Studies at the University of the Witwaterstrand Johannesburg, South Africa, he established the Chair and Centre of Jewish Studies there and headed and directed it until 1993. Since 1968 Professor Sharon has been documenting and studying in depth the Arabic Inscriptions of the Holy Land and publishing them in multi-volume opus: Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum Palaestinae (CIAP, six books) concurrent with his many scholarly publications on Islamic history and civilization. Among these are Black Banners from the East in 2 volumes, by now classic on the earliest revolutionary movement in Islam; Judaism Christianity and Islam, Interaction and Conflict; Judaism in the Context of Diverse Civilizations; Studies in Modern Religions and Religious Movements (ed.); The Bahá’í Religion and its Most Holy Book and many more. Professor Sharon is one of foremost authorities on early ‘Abbasid history, History of the Holy Land under Islam, and a world expert on Arabic Epigraphy. In the field of public activity he served as Prime Minister Begin Advisor on Arab Affairs (1978-1980) and participated in the initial stages of the Israeli-Egyptian peace process. Later he was the Head of the Department of Arab Affairs in the IDF Central Command, advisor to the Minister of Defense, and special envoy to the Shi‘ites in Lebanon. More than a year ago he was appointed by a unanimous decision of the Government of Israel as Chairman of the Place-Name Committee responsible for the official fixing of all place names on the map of the country.
 
89Name:  Professor Erika Simon
 Institution:  University of Würzburg
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1927
 Death Date:  February 15, 2019
   
 
Erika Simon was born in Ludwigshafen (then in the suburb Rheingönheim), and from 1930 she lived in Aschaffenburg/Main (not far from Frankfurt) where she attended high school. Then from 1947 on she was a student at Heidelberg University and Munich University. From 1953-59 she was an assistant at Mainz University, and from 1959-63 she was a Docent at Heidelberg University. She had a visiting position from 1961-62 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. From 1964-94 she was Professor of Classical Archaeology at Würzburg University and Director of the Antiquities in Martin-von-Wagner Museum. She has been professor emerita since 1994. Dr. Simon is the author of Die Götter der Griechen (1969); Das antike Theater (1972); Pergamon und Hesiod (1975); Festivals of Attica, An Archaeological Commentary (1983); Die konstantinischen Deckengemälde in Trier (1986); Die Götter der Römer (1990); and Ausgewahlte Schriften I/II (1998). She is a member of the German Archaeological Institute and has honorary doctorates at Athens and Thessaloniki Universities.
 
90Name:  Dr. Nicholas Sims-Williams
 Institution:  University of London
 Year Elected:  2014
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Nicholas Sims-Williams is Research Professor of Iranian and Central Asian Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, whose faculty he joined in 1976. Nicholas Sims-Williams is an Iranologist, a philologist and linguist who has brought the little-known world of Iranian Central Asia to vivid life by his studies of religious texts, especially concerning Manichaeism and Buddhism, and everyday documents in a host of languages, above all Sogdian and Bactrian. The latter was practically lost to memory when Sims-Williams deciphered a trove of ancient legal documents and letters found in Afghanistan and identified their language as Bactrian, reconstructing its grammar and vocabulary and recovering six hundred years of a lost culture - "the most exciting discovery in Iranian Studies in the last two decades," as it was called in the introduction to his 2009 Festschrift. He was awarded the Prix Ghirshman of the Institut de France and the Hirayama Prize from the Institute of Silk Road Studies. Sims-Williams is the author of The Christian Sogdian Manuscript C2, 1985; Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Vol. I: Legal and Economic Documents, 2001; Recent Discoveries in the Bactrian Language and Their Historical Significance, 2004; (with F. de Blois) Dictionary of Manichaean Texts, Vol. II, Texts from Iraq and Iran, 2006; Bactrian Documents from Northern Afghanistan, Vol. 2: Letters and Buddhist Texts, 2007. He is a member of the British Academy and the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, Institut de France. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2014.
 
91Name:  Dame Marilyn Strathern
 Institution:  University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2016
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
Marilyn Strathern describes herself as a conventional social anthropologist. A product of the Cambridge School of Social Anthropology at its heyday in the 1960s, she carried out fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, her texts reflecting issues largely within the discipline rather than outside it (Mary Douglas once called her -- not altogether flatteringly -- ‘an anthropologist’s anthropologist’). These days she has an interdisciplinary audience. Strathern’s interests have been fairly consistently divided between Melanesian and British ethnography. She is probably most well known for The gender of the gift (1988), a critique of anthropological theories of society and gender relations applied to Melanesia, which she herself pairs with After nature: English kinship in the late twentieth century (1992), a comment on the cultural revolution at home. Her most experimental work is an exercise on the comparative method called Partial connections (1991). Projects over the last twenty five years are reflected in publications on reproductive technologies, intellectual and cultural property rights and interdisciplinarity, although it is her brief work on regimes of audit and accountability that has attracted most widespread attention. Some of these themes are brought together in Kinship, law and the unexpected (2005). Papua New Guinea is never far from her concerns, her most recent visit to Mt Hagen being in 2015. Her first departmental position was at the University of Manchester, UK. Now an emeritus Professor of Social Anthropology, Strathern retired from the Cambridge Department of Social Anthropology in 2008 and from being head of Cambridge’s Girton College in 2009. A fellow of the British Academy since 1987, she received a national honour (DBE) in 2001, and is currently (hon.) Life President of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth.
 
92Name:  Dr. Sarah Stroumsa
 Institution:  Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Sarah Stroumsa is the Alice and Jack Ormut Professor Emerita of Arabic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her academic education at the Hebrew University, as well as at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. She taught in the Department of Arabic Language and Literature and the Department of Jewish Thought at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she served as Vice-Rector and then as Rector. She is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, as well as of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. She is a laureate of the Humboldt Research Award, a holder of the Italian Order of Merit, and a recipient of the Leopold Lucas Prize. Her academic focus is the history of philosophical and theological thought in Arabic in the early Islamic Middle Ages, and the medieval Judaeo-Arabic philosophical literature. She strives to offer a multifocal approach to the study of intellectual history, an approach she used in her publications as well as in the Intellectual Encounters of the Islamicate World, a master’s program she initiated with her colleagues Sabine Schmidtke and Sari Nusseibeh. Among her published books in English: Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn al-Rāwaādī, Abū Bakr al-Rāzī, and Their Impact on Islamic Thought (Leiden: Brill, 1999); Maimonides in his World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker (Princeton: Princeton University, 2010); Dāwūd al-Muqammaṣ, Twenty Chapters (Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2016); and Andalus and Sefarad: On Philosophy and Its History in Islamic Spain (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019). Her current work focuses on methodological questions in the study of medieval intellectual history (e.g. linear and non-linear tracing of influences, the reliability of unique sources, and the reconstruction of unwritten elements of the texts, such as mimic and tone).
 
93Name:  Sir Ronald Syme
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  1959
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  401. Archaeology
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1903
 Death Date:  9/4/89
   
94Name:  Dr. Romila Thapar
 Institution:  Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
 Year Elected:  2019
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1931
   
 
Romila Thapar is Emeritus Professor of History at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she was Professor of Ancient Indian History from 1970 to 1991. She was General President of the Indian History Congress in 1983. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and holds an Honorary D.Litt. each from Calcutta, Oxford, and Chicago Universities, among others. She is an Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, and of St. Anthony's College, Oxford, and of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University. In 2008 Professor Thapar was awarded the prestigious Kluge Prize of the United States Library of Congress, which honours lifetime achievement in studies such as history that are not covered by the Nobel Prize.
 
95Name:  Dr. Joan Thirsk
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  1982
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1922
 Death Date:  October 3, 2013
   
 
A scholar of agrarian history, Joan Thirsk was Reader in Economic History at the University of Oxford from 1965 to 1983. No one did more to emphasise the significance of the land in early modern England than Dr. Thirsk, whose writings represent an important contribution to the national history while also pointing the way for future research. Dr. Thirsk's many authoritative works include English Peasant Farming (1957); Tudor Enclosures (1959); The Agrarian History of England Wales, IV, 1500-1640 (1967), V, 1640-1760 (1984); The Restoration (1976); Economic Policy and Projects (1978); Alternative Agriculture: A History from the Black Death to the Present Day (1997); Food in Early Modern England: Phases, Fads, Fashions, 1500-1760 (2007); and Hadlow: Life, Land and People in a Wealden Paris, 1460-1600 (2007). She also served as the editor of Agricultural History Review (1964-72). She was an honorary fellow of St. Hilda's College and Kellogg College and had also taught at the London School of Economics. Joan Thirsk was elected an International member of the American Philosophical Society in 1982. She died October 3, 2013, at the age of 91 in Kent, England.
 
96Name:  Dr. Tzvetan Todorov
 Institution:  CNRS, Paris
 Year Elected:  1998
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  402. Criticism: Arts and Letters
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1939
 Death Date:  February 7, 2017
   
 
Tzvetan Todorov was a Bulgarian born historian, cultural critic and essayist who lived in France from 1963 until his death February 7, 2017, in Paris at age 77. After his pioneering early work on literary theory, he chose to explore issues of human diversity, of universalism vs. relativism and of human behavior in extreme situations. He did this with erudition, balance, and a sense of compassion - not to mention extraordinary productivity. Dr. Todorov published more than 30 books, including The Poetics of Prose (1971), Introduction to Poetics (1981), The Conquest of America (1982), Mikhail Bakhtin: The Dialogical Principle (1984), Facing the Extreme: Moral Life in the Concentration Camps (1991), On Human Diversity (1993), Hope and Memory (2000), and Imperfect Garden: The Legacy of Humanism (2002). He was a member of the Conseil National des Programmes au Ministère de l'Education Nationale and has served as visiting professor at several universities, including Harvard, Yale, Columbia and the University of California, Berkeley. His honors include the prizes Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1991), Charles Veillon (1998), Nonino (2002), Spinoza (2004), Grinzane Cavour (2007) and Prince of Asturias (2008); he also was an Officer of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. He was a Doctor honoris causa of the Universities of Sofia, Liège, Mannheim and the American University in Paris, a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur and an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr. Todorov held the title of Directeur de recherches honoraire at CNRS, Paris at the time of his death.
 
97Name:  Eric Turner
 Year Elected:  1977
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1911
 Death Date:  4/20/83
   
98Name:  John B. Ward-Perkins
 Institution:  British School in Rome
 Year Elected:  1981
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1912
 Death Date:  5/28/81
   
99Name:  Dr. Martin Litchfield West
 Institution:  All Souls College, University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  405. History and Philology, East and West, through the 17th Century
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1937
 Death Date:  July 13, 2015
   
 
Martin Litchfield West wrote the following biography in 2010, the year he was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society. He died July 13, 2015, at the age of 77. I was born in London on 23 September 1937, the first child of Maurice Charles West, Civil Engineer, and his wife Catherine. We lived through the Second World War at Hampton, Middlesex, far enough out of London to receive only occasional bombs in the neighborhood, though the house was damaged one night. The first seven years of my education were spent at a local primary school. Then I was put into the more challenging and stimulating milieu of Colet Court, the junior school attached to one of the major British independent schools, St. Paul's, and after three years I graduated to the main school. There was a strong emphasis there on Latin and Greek, which suited my growing interest in languages, and I had some excellent teachers. In 1955 I went with a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, to pursue the four-year Literae Humaniores course. Among those who taught and influenced me there were Gordon Williams (my college tutor), E. R. Dodds, and Eduard Fraenkel, whose famous seminars were a daunting test-bed for fledgling scholars. In 1959 I embarked on graduate work, choosing Hesiod as my area of study and Hugh Lloyd-Jones as my supervisor. He did me a great service by arranging for me to spend the next summer semester in Germany under Reinhold Merkelbach. Besides raising my German to a state of fluency, those months opened my eyes to different approaches, and I made the acquaintance of such powerful scholars as Walter Burkert, Rudolf Kassel, and Winfried Bühler, who were to remain lifelong friends. Before leaving for Germany I had been elected to a three-year Junior Research Fellowship at St. John's College, Oxford, which I took up on my return. On the last day of 1960 I married my wife Stephanie, whom I had met at Fraenkel's seminars; she was now also doing graduate work and was to establish herself as a scholar in her own right. In 1963, following several unsuccessful applications for permanent positions in universities, I had the good fortune to be offered a Fellowship in Oxford at University College. The same summer we had our first child and I completed my doctoral thesis, a commentary on Hesiod's Theogony (augmented with a critical text and published in 1966). I taught at University College for eleven years, while continuing to publish. In the fall of 1967 I spent a sabbatical term at Harvard as a visiting lecturer - my first experience of the USA. In 1974 I was asked whether I would be interested in the chair in Greek at Bedford College, London; it was intimated that I could continue to live in Oxford, where Stephanie was now employed and where our children were at school. I accepted the offer and began a new life of travelling up to London for a few days each week. The London University scene, initially tranquil, became turbulent in the early eighties. There was official pressure for 'rationalization,' for mergers of colleges and departments, and after strenuous discussions it came about that Bedford merged with Royal Holloway College. This meant that my workplace was transferred from central London to a site out in Surrey, a little closer to Oxford but more awkward to reach by public transport. This forced me, at the age of 47, to learn to drive a car, something I had never before needed to do but much enjoyed doing once I mastered it. During my London period I had two further memorable extended stays abroad: in 1980 a month in Japan as a guest of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and in 1986 a quarter as Visiting Professor at UCLA. In 1991 I was successful with an application for a Senior Research Fellowship at All Souls College Oxford, as desirable a position as any in the academic world, and one that freed me from the regular commuting to Surrey and from increasingly tiresome administrative chores. It gave me the leisure to apply myself to learning Akkadian and some other Semitic languages, which I wanted to do in order to write a book on West Asiatic elements in early Greek poetry (The East Face of Helicon, 1997). I believe it is valuable for a classicist to learn other ancient languages besides Greek and Latin, and as a result of doing so I have been able, since 1994, to publish half a dozen articles on Mesopotamian and Iranian topics, and recently to complete a translation of Zoroaster's Gathas (to appear in August 2010). In 2000 my work received a wholly unexpected tribute in the form of the international Balzan Prize for Classical Antiquity. I reached the statutory age of retirement in 2004, and my status at All Souls changed to that of Emeritus Fellow. I remain active in research and publication, and take pleasure in the tokens of recognition that continue to descend on me from time to time, such as the Festschrift produced for my 70th birthday in 2007, the honorary doctorate conferred by the University of Cyprus in 2008 (which came with a splendiferous robe and hat), and most recently my election to the American Philosophical Society. Martin West
 
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