American Philosophical Society
Member History

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International[X]
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4. Humanities[X]
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406. Linguistics[X]
1Name:  Dr. Kurt Baldinger
 Institution:  University of Heidelberg
 Year Elected:  1976
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1919
 Death Date:  unknown
   
 
Born in Switzerland in 1919, Kurt Baldinger is an educator and linguist who, as a professor of Romance philology, has been associated with the University of Heidelberg (Ruprecht-Karl Universität) since 1957. He was a professor in Berlin from 1948-56 and served as director of the Institut für romanische Sprachwissenschaft of the Berlin Academy of Sciences from 1949-56. He is a member of the Akademie der Wissenschaften, Heidelberg, the Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften and the Société de Linguistique romane, among others. The author of a number of books, from Kollektivsuffixe und Kollektivebegriff (1950) to Teoria semántica: hacia una semántica moderna (1970), Dr. Baldinger also founded and edited the Dictionnaire étymologique de l'ancien français and served as editor-in-chief of the Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch.
 
2Name:  Dr. Anna Morpurgo Davies
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  1991
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1937
 Death Date:  September 27, 2014
   
 
Anna Morpurgo Davies was born in 1937 in Milan (Italy) to Maria (née Castelnuovo), a teacher, and Augusto Morpurgo, an industrial engineer. Her father died when she was one and a half years old, and her mother moved with her four children to Rome, where they miraculously survived Mussolini's anti-Jewish laws and the year of German occupation. Anna took her first degree in classics and comparative philology at the University of Rome with a dissertation on Mycenaean declensions (1959), and she then served for two years as an assistant to the Chair of Greek and Latin Grammar before obtaining a Junior Fellowship at the Center for Hellenic Studies newly founded by Harvard University in Washington DC (1961-62). In 1962 she married J.K. Davies, a British ancient historian (marriage dissolved 1978), and moved to Oxford, England, where in 1964 she was appointed to a University Lectureship in Classical Philology and in 1966 to a Fellowship of St. Hilda's College (Hon. Fellow from 1972). In 1963 she obtained an Italian libera docenza. In 1971 she was elected to the Oxford Chair of Comparative Philology (renamed the Diebold Chair of Comparative Philology from 2003) and to a Fellowship of Somerville College; she retired in September 2004. She was a member of the British Academy and of the Academia Europaea, a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, a Corresponding Member of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres (Paris), of the Austrian Academy (Vienna) and of the Bavarian Academy (München). She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 1991. In 1981 she received an Hon. D.Litt. From the University of St. Andrews (Scotland) and from 1993 she was an Honorary Member of the Linguistic Society of America. She was the President of the (British) Philological Society from 1976-80 (Hon. Vice-President 1980-), and she served as Delegate of Oxford University Press for twelve years. In 2001 she was awarded an Honorary D.B.E. for services to philology and linguistics. She was a Visiting Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in 1971, at Yale University in 1977, at the University of California, Berkeley in 2006 and 2007, and the Sather Professor of Classical Literature at the University of California, Berkeley in 2000; she had also given a series of named lectures at the University of Cincinnati, Stanford University, Harvard University and the Scuola Normale di Pisa. In 1975 she was the Collitz Professor of the Linguistic Society of America. In broad terms her work was concerned with Indo-European comparative and historical linguistics, but she has mainly concentrated on three areas: the history and prehistory of Ancient Greek; the Indo-European languages of Anatolia and in particular Hieroglyphic Luwian (often in collaboration with J .D. Hawkins), the history of Nineteenth Century Linguistics. Her first book (1963) was a lexicon of Mycenaean Greek, the language of the Second Millennium B.C. clay tablets written in Linear B (a syllabic script deciphered in 1952) and found in Crete and the Peloponnese. She continued to work on Mycenaean all through her career. She had also written extensively on the ancient Greek dialects of the First Millennium B.C. and in general on Greek historical linguistics. Her Nineteenth Century Linguistics (1998) was preceded by an Italian version (1996). In 2004 she was presented with a Festschrift published by Oxford University Press (Indo-European Perspectives. Studies in Honour of Anna Morpurgo Davies, edited by J.H.W. Penney; also Morpurgo Davies, Anna in K. Brown, ed., Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2006). For an autobiographical essay see K. Brown and V. Law eds., Linguistics in Britain: Personal Histories (Publications of the Philological Society, 36), Oxford 2002, pp. 213-227. Anna Morpurgo Davies died September 27, 2014 at the age of 77 in Oxford.
 
3Name:  Dr. Dietz Otto Edzard
 Institution:  Institut für Assyriologie und Hethitologie, Universität München
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1930
 Death Date:  June 2, 2004
   
4Name:  Lord Oliver Shewell Franks
 Year Elected:  1949
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1905
 Death Date:  10/15/92
   
5Name:  Dr. Vyacheslav V. Ivanov
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles & Russian State University for the Humanities
 Year Elected:  1994
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1929
 Death Date:  October 7, 2017
   
 
Vyacheslav Vsevolodovich Ivanov was born in 1929 in Moscow. Thanks to his parents (a well-known Russian writer and an actress of the Meyerhold avant-garde theatre) and their friends, he received a traditional Russian education and began writing poems, essays and prose works at an early age (most of which were never published). He continued his education at Moscow University (in the departments of Romance and Germanic philology and Sanskrit and Indo-European Studies) and received his Ph.D. in Hittite and Indo-European linguistics in 1955. He then taught comparative and general linguistics there, until he was dismissed in 1958 because of his friendship with Boris Pasternak. Due to political reasons, for thirty years he was unable to travel abroad as the government denied him an official travel visa. Fortunately, he was still able to continue his research work at the Institutes of the Academy of Sciences. In 1988 he was invited to return to Moscow University where he then became Chair of the new Department of the Theory and History of World Culture and Director of its affiliated Research Institute. Amidst the new political trends in Russia, he was elected to serve in the Russian Congress of People's Deputies, representing the researchers from the Institutes of the Academy. He has been appointed to several academies in Russia, Latvia, Great Britain, and the United States. With several Moscow and Tartu friends, he co-founded the Moscow-Tartu school of semiotics. In 1988, Professor Ivanov began teaching regularly at American universities - first at Yale University, then at Stanford University, and finally at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he was a professor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and in the Indo-European Studies Program. Ivanov shared his time between Los Angeles and Moscow, where he taught in the Russian State University for the Humanities. He authored more than fifteen books and 1,000 journal articles. From 1992 on, he was editor-in-chief of a new journal in Slavic studies: Elementa. Journal of Slavic Studies and Comparative Cultural Semiotics, which continues the tradition of the Moscow-Tartu school. Professor Ivanov also directed the Library of Foreign Literature in Moscow and played a central role in promoting the necessity of open access to information in the democratization of Russian society. In addition to his standing as one of the great minds in 20th century intellectual life, Professor Ivanov was one of the greatest defenders of human rights in his country. Vyacheslav Ivanov died on October 7, 2017 at the age of 88.
 
6Name:  Dr. Charles H. Malik
 Year Elected:  1958
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1906
 Death Date:  12/28/87
   
7Name:  Dr. Manfred Mayrhofer
 Institution:  University of Vienna
 Year Elected:  1992
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  406. Linguistics
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1926
 Death Date:  October 31, 2011
   
 
Professor Emeritus at the University of Vienna, Manfred Mayrhofer is a noted Indo-Europeanist specializing in Indo-Iranian languages. Renowned for his etymological dictionary of Sanskrit, he studied Indo-European and Semitic linguistics along with philosophy at the University of Graz, Austria, which awarded him a Ph.D. in 1951. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Vienna in 1962, Dr. Mayrhofer taught at the Universities of Wurzburg and Saarbrucken. He is a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and an honorary member of the Linguistic Society of America. Manfred Mayhofer died October 31, 2011, at age 86 in Vienna.
 
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