American Philosophical Society
Member History

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5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs[X]
1Name:  Mr. Woody Allen
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
In a career spanning nearly five decades and three dozen films, Woody Allen has established himself as one of the major auteurs of contemporary international cinema, with a comic voice that is distinctively twentieth-century American-jokey, anxious, unmistakably New York-and a moral and aesthetic vision that owes much to the filmmaker’s immersion in the great classics of European literature and cinema. Having established his comic bona fides with early works from Play It Again, Sam (an early foray into magical realism) to his paranoid futuristic fantasy Sleeper, Allen came into his own as a serious artist, with a special talent for depicting wry romantic disappointment in the context of American subcultural conflicts, in films such as his Oscar-winning Annie Hall and Manhattan. A series of marvelously rich tragicomedies of the 1980s, tinged with distinctively Continental colors and experimenting with great success with magical realism and metafictionality as technical means of exploring his perennial interest in the relationships between eros, art, and morality, includes The Purple Rose of Cairo, Crimes and Misdemeanors and Alice-an evolution that has been capped, in more recent years, by such acclaimed later works as Match Point and Vicky Christina Barcelona. His recent films include Midnight in Paris (2011) and Blue Jasmine (2013). In 2014 he was awarded the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award.
 
2Name:  Dr. Leon Botstein
 Institution:  Bard College
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Leon Botstein has been president of Bard College since 1975. He received his B.A. degree with special honors in history from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in European history from Harvard. Dr. Botstein has been the music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992 and was appointed the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, the orchestra of the Israel Broadcast Authority, in 2003. An active international conductor, he makes frequent guest appearances with major orchestras around the world. His most recent recording is Bruno Walter’s Symphony in D Minor with the NDR Symphony Orchestra. Other recent CDs are John Fould’s A World Requiem, Ernest Chausson’s Le roi Arthus, and Paul Dukas’s Ariane et Barbe-Bleue, all with the BBC Symphony Orchestra; the music of George Perle, Roger Sessions, Bernard Rands, and Aaron Copland with the American Symphony Orchestra; and Popov’s Symphony No. 1, Op. 7, with the London Symphony Orchestra, which was nominated for a 2006 Grammy Award. He is the founder and an artistic director of the Bard Music Festival, now in its twentieth year. Dr. Botstein is the author of Jefferson's Children: Education and the Promise of American Culture, co-editor of Jews and the City of Vienna, 1870-1938, and editor of The Compleat Brahms. A member of the American Philosophical Society, Dr. Botstein has received the Carnegie Corporation Academic Leadership Award, the Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Harvard University's Centennial Award, and the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art.
 
3Name:  The Honorable Michael Boudin
 Institution:  U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Since 1992, Michael Boudin has been a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston, serving as chief judge from 2001 to 2008. After graduating from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, where he served as President of the Harvard Law Review, he clerked for Judge Henry Friendly and then for Justice John Harlan. He practiced law, first as associate and then as partner, at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C (1965-87); held office as deputy assistant attorney general in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice (1987-90); and served on the federal district court in Washington, D.C. (1990-92). Since 1982, he has generally taught antitrust law and other subjects part time at Harvard Law School and, in one semester, at University of Pennsylvania Law School. For many years, he served as a member of the Council of the American Law Institute, taking emeritus status at the end of 2009. He is also the author of sundry law journals articles and book reviews.
 
4Name:  Ms. Rosalind Chast
 Institution:  The New Yorker
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
 
Rosalind (Roz) Chast received a BFA at the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1998 she was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Pratt Institute and in 2004 she was given the Museum of Cartoon and Comic Art Festival Award. She is the author and illustrator of Last Resorts, 1979; Unscientific Americans, 1982; Parallel Universes, 1984; Mondo Boxo, 1987; The Four Elements, 1988; Proof of Life on Earth, 1992; The Joy of Being Single, 1992; Childproof, 1997; Rationalizations To Live By, 2002; Weird and Wonderful Words, 2004; The Party, After You Left, 2004; Theories of Everything: Selected, Collected, and Health-Inspected Cartoons 1978-2006, 2006; with Steve Martin, The Alphabet from A to Y With Bonus Letter Z!, 2007; What I Hate: From A to Z, 2011; and Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? 2014 (which won the National Book Award in Autobiography). She was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2010. Ms. Chast is one of the most gifted cartoonists of her generation. Since 1979 she has been on the staff of The New Yorker, where she has now published more than a thousand cartoons. Her first of many covers for The New Yorker appeared in 1986. Her work also appears in other publications, including Scientific American and Harvard Business Review. If her cartoons have a common denominator it must be that they are very clever and quietly and irresistibly funny. She draws little figures, sometimes inquisitive, sometimes abashed, and most often bewildered. Chast's subjects are usually domestic or family oriented. Her art is deceptively simple; many surprises await the reader who parses carefully the backgrounds against which her figures appear. Her comics reflect a "conspiracy of inanimate objects," an expression she credits to her mother. Her most recent book, Theories of Everything: Selected, Collected, and Health-Inspected Cartoons 1978-2006, offers a splendid review of Chast's work; amusement, with moments of breaking into uncontrollable laughter, is guaranteed.
 
5Name:  Dr. Wolfgang F. Fruehwald
 Institution:  Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation; Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1935
 Death Date:  January 18, 2019
   
 
Wolfgang Fruehwald died on January 18, 2019 in Augsburg, Germany at the age of 83. Below is a biographical essay he wrote following his election to the American Philosophical Society in 2010. Augsburg, where I was born in August 1935, is a city in the Swabian part of Bavaria with about 250,000 residents. Thus, until today I speak with a Swabian accent. I grew up in a small family of four persons, father, mother and my brother who is four years my senior. We lived in a small green suburb, called "garden-town," that means we had a big garden with flowers, fruits and vegetables, and a huge forest was nearby. When I was four years old, the world turned into fire and war. The Nazis started the Second World War, and some years later my school was bombed. But as luck would have it our family survived. In April 1945, peace was a brand new experience for me. It was a godsend that the following decades, the decades of my life as a boy and a man, are the longest periods of peace which Europe ever experienced in modern history. In autumn 1945, the schools were reopened. I went to high school and studied Latin, Greek, English, a little bit of French and Hebrew. When I received my high school-diploma in 1954 I was 19 years old. My fiancée, Victoria Schwarzkopf, was my classmate in the last classes of high school. We married four years later and are lucky enough to have now been married for more than 50 years. We have five children, two daughters and three sons (also three daughters in law), and 11 grandchildren. In 1954, when I began to study at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, I was an outsider in my family. I studied German Language and Literature, History, Geography and Philosophy to become a high school-teacher in Bavaria. My grandfather and my father were railway employees in Germany. My brother chose the same career. In 1958, I received my first university degree (Staatsexamen) and was appointed assistant professor at the Institute of German Philology at Munich University. I received my Ph.D. in 1961, with a dissertation about medieval sermons from the 13th century, in 1969 I received the postdoctorate qualification (Habilitation) with a book about the German poet Clemens Brentano. My first appointment as full professor of History of German Literature was in 1970 at the University Trier-Kaiserslautern. In 1974, I accepted an offer for a chair at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. I declined offers from the University of Augsburg (1973) and the Free University of Berlin (1985). In 1985, I accepted an invitation as Distinguished Max Kade Visiting Professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. In 1984, when I was elected a member and four years later chairman of a reviewers committee (Fachausschuss) of the German Research Association (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), a busy period began in my life. Working for nongovernmental organizations of science and scholarship in Germany, Austria, Israel and the European Union I met very experienced colleagues and learned something new every day. It is not possible to enumerate all the functions and appointments which I had in science policy, science management and science organizations during more than twenty years. But, in addition to my chair at an institute with more than 6,000 students, my work for the German Research Association and the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation were the main obligations which I held. I was elected a member of the senate and the grants committee of the German Research Association in 1986. In 1991, I was elected and 1994 reelected President of Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. After six years in office (two terms, 1991 - 1997) I returned to my chair in Munich. In 1999, I was elected President of the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation. The foundation has alumni-clubs in more than 50 countries of the world. During the eight years of my presidency (1999 - 2007) I visited 32 of them on different continents, in Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, in the United States, in Canada and in some countries of South America. I travelled once or twice every year around the world and I met new and old members of the worldwide Humboldt-Family. Looking back at 45 years as a scholar and a science manager I am very grateful that in many difficult situations and in each country which I visited I found collaborators, members and friends of the big science community which gave me the confidence that we are together able to increase the quality of life. Since 2003, I have been Professor Emeritus, since 2008 Honorary President of the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation.
 
6Name:  Dr. Martin L. Levitt
 Institution:  American Philosophical Society
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  502. Physicians, Theologians, Lawyers, Jurists, Architects, and Members of Other Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Martin Levitt was Associate Director of the American Philosophical Society Library when he succeeded Edward C. Carter II as Librarian in 2003. Under Levitt's direction, the Library is now a leader in the use of technology and has undertaken several digitizing initiatives designed to produce better access to the Society's collections. Levitt earned his doctorate under the supervision of APS member Russell F. Weigley in 1990, and in pursuing his career as an information professional, was subsequently named a Fulbright Fellow in archives (1991-92), a Fellow of the Mary and David Eccles Center of the British Library, and was elected President of the Academy of Certified Archivists. He helped found the Philadelphia Area Center for the History of Science, a consortium of regional research institutions, for which he raised establishing funds and appointed its first director; PACHS is now an independent 501(c)(3) organization housed at the APS that sponsored 13 fellows this year. Of special note, when appointed Librarian of the Society in 2003, Levitt undertook a vigorous program of renovation and re-organization. The renovations included improved spaces for public services, expanded spaces for staff, a modernized conservation facility and cataloging suite, renovation of the stack areas and redistribution of the collections to make the best use of available spaces, and the creation of state-of-the-art fire detection, fire suppression, security, and technology infrastructures. Additionally, he has held a faculty position in the history department at Temple University since 1992, and has been a full professor since 2000. Levitt, who had worked in the APS Library since 1986, also sat on the Board of the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries, revitalized the Friends of the APS Library lecture program, and began an investigation into the possible re-patriation of data owned by the Society into the hands of Native American communities. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2010. He retired at the end of 2014.
 
7Name:  Dr. Glenn D. Lowry
 Institution:  Museum of Modern Art
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
 
Glenn Lowry is the remarkably accomplished director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). He became the director at the age of 40, bringing to his new task solid credentials as a historian of Moghul art, curator, and director of two smaller museums. He faced a complex situation. From the start, he had to plunge into preparations for an expansion of the museum's space that would be unprecedented in scope, with all that involved in terms of planning for acquisition of land, negotiations over zoning, selection of a design and architectural team and raising the necessary financing (about $700 million). At the same time he had to face the challenges and opportunities resulting from a changing of the guard at MoMA as a new group of brilliant curators came to the fore. He handled both the expansion of the museum and the internal challenges masterfully, drawing on his skill as an administrator and fund raiser and on his solid background as a scholar who understands what curators do but has no desire to supplant them. The result is an astonishing success story. MoMA's expansion – really the construction of a new museum – was completed on time and within budget, and the museum continues to do extremely well, as evidenced by record numbers of visitors and a range of special exhibitions. He is the author of: Storm Across Asia: Genghis Khan and the Mongols, (1981); (with M. Brand) Akbar's India, Art From the Mughal City of Victory, (1985); (with F. Shen, A. Yonemura) From Concept to Context: Approaches to Asian and Islamic Calligraphy, (1986); A Jeweler's Eye: Islamic Arts of the Book from the Vever Collection, (1986); (with T. Lentz) Timur and the Princely Vision, (1989); and Designing the New Museum of Modern Art, (2004). He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 2005, and was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2010.
 
8Name:  Professor Martha Minow
 Institution:  Harvard Law School
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  504. Scholars in the Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
 
Martha Minow is Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School and Distinguished Service Professor at Harvard University. On July 1, 2018 she will begin her appointment as the 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard. She served as the Dean and Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor at Harvard Law School, 2009-2017, where she has taught since 1981. An expert in human rights with a focus on members of racial and religious minorities and women, children, and persons with disabilities, her scholarship also has addressed private military contractors, management of mass torts, transitional justice, and law, culture, and social change. She has published over 150 articles and her books include Partners, Not Rivals, Privatization and the Public Good; Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence; Not Only for Myself: Identity Politics and Law; and Making all the Difference: Inclusion, Exclusion, and American Law. She has edited or co-edited many books including Government by Contract; Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference; Breaking the Cycles of Hatred: Memory, Law and Repair; Imagine Co-Existence: Restoring Humanity After Violent Ethnic Conflict; Law Stories; Family Matters; Civil Procedure: Doctrine, Practice and Context; Women and the Law; and Narrative, Violence and the Law: The Essays of Robert M. Cover. In Brown's Wake: Legacies of America's Educational Landmark, was be published in 2010. Following nomination by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate, she served as vice-chair of the board of the Legal Services Corporation. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Michigan and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Minow received her law degree at Yale Law School before serving as a law clerk to Judge David Bazelon and Justice Thurgood Marshall. A member of the Academy of Arts & Sciences, she has received the Sacks-Freund Teaching Award at Harvard Law School; the Holocaust Center Award, the Radcliffe Graduate Society Medal and honorary doctorates in Education (Wheelock College) and law (University of Toronto). She was awarded the 2015-16 Gittler Prize.
 
9Name:  Mr. Paul Moravec
 Institution:  Adelphi University
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  501. Creative Artists
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1957
   
 
Through his Tempest Fantasy, his recent opera, his numerous orchestral and choral works, as well as the chamber piece Useful Knowledge created for Benjamin Franklin's words and an instrument that Franklin is believed to have invented (the glass harmonica), Paul Moravec has achieved great distinction among the new generation of tonal composers. His theatrical instincts are reflected in his choice of themes, such as Shakespeare's Tempest, a blizzard in the 19th century, and Maugham's steamy tale of adultery in Southeast Asia. His exceptional mastery of orchestration has produced music of great emotional intensity. He contributes energetically to the promotion of contemporary music by supporting younger musicians, by frequently speaking before concerts and operas, and by actively collaborating with writers. Dr. Moravec is currently University Professor at Adelphi University, having earned his D.M.A. from Columbia University in 1987. In addition to those works listed above, he composed Blizzard Voices in 2007, The Letter in 2009, and the music for Sanctuary Road in 2018. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 2004 and the Arts and Letters Award in Music from the Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2012. Paul Moravec was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2010
 
10Name:  Dr. Joseph Rishel
 Institution:  Philadelphia Museum of Art
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  504. Scholars in the Professions
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Since arriving at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1971, Joseph J. Rishel has made his life’s work the expansion and research of the museum’s collections, the engagement with its international public, and the fulfillment of its potential to contribute to its immediate community. He currently serves there as the Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting before 1900 and recently took a post at the National Gallery of Art as Samuel H. Kress Professor. Through a series of extraordinary exhibitions, including Cézanne (1995-96), The Splendor of 18th Century Rome (2000), Manet and the Sea (2003-04), The Arts in Latin America, 1492-1820 (2006-07), and Cézanne and Beyond (2009), this curator and diplomat has imagined new ways of presenting works both famous and unknown, and he has overcome immense obstacles in realizing these visions. Within the museum profession he is highly regarded for his dedication to the formation of a new generation of curators, and he has been particularly supportive of the combination of technical analysis with historical evidence in research. In Philadelphia he serves as chairman of the Barnes Foundation Collection Assessment Advisory Committee. From Mexico City to London and Paris, he is held in the highest esteem as a colleague and convivial companion by artists and scholars alike. He received his M.A. from the University of Chicago in 1962 and is the author or coauthor of a number of works including Delacroix: The Late Work, (with E. Delacroix, et al 1998), Goya: Another Look (2006), and Cezanne and Beyond (with K. Sachs and a team of scholars 2009). He has been honored a number of times, including twice by the French Government, being named Chevalier, l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1996 and Officier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 2002. Rishel is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2010.
 
11Name:  Mr. Rodolfo H. Terragno
 Institution:  21st Century University, Argentina
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  5. The Arts, Professions, and Leaders in Public & Private Affairs
 Subdivision:  503. Administrators, Bankers and Opinion Leaders from the Public or Private Sectors
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Rodolfo Terragno, a lawyer and journalist during the military dictatorship in Argentina, became a celebrated political commentator who was forced to emigrate, first to Venezuela, where he founded El Diario de Caracas, and then to England, where he began his work on political philosophy and Latin American history. With the fall of the military regime in 1983 he returned to Argentina to become a member of Raul Alfonsin's cabinet. Since then he has served the Argentine people in many capacities, most notably as a Minister, Head of the Cabinet, President of the Opposition Radical Party, and candidate for the national presidency. Terragno's political philosophy, expressed in his books, emphasizes the role of the cooperation of government and business in the promotion of science and education as the basic ingredients for the growth of post-industrial economies in developing countries. These ideas have been influential throughout the continent and beyond. Terragno has also authored important books on the South American independence movement in the early 19th century and on the foundations of the Falkland Islands conflict. One of his most original contributions was the discovery in Scotland of the "Maitland papers" which revealed a secret British plan for the invasion of South America and the takeover of the vice royalty of Peru - very similar to the plan executed by San Martin decades later. Rodolfo Terragno is currently chairman of, and teaches at, the Fundación Argentina Siglo 21. He received a law degree in 1967 from the School of Law and Social Sciences at the National University of Buenos Aires. His books include Memorias del Presente (1984), The Challenge of Real Development (1987), Maitland & San Martín (1998), and Historia y Futuro de las Malvinas (2006). His many honors include the French Ordre National du Mérite in 1987, the Italian Cavaliere di Gran Croce in 1987, and Brazil's Medalha Mérito Maua in 1988. Rodolfo Terragno was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2010.
 
Election Year
2010[X]