American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Resident (3)
Class
Subdivision
304. Jurisprudence and Political Science[X]
1Name:  Professor Geoffrey R. Stone
 Institution:  University of Chicago Law School
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1946
   
 
Geoffrey R. Stone is the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. A member of the law faculty since 1973, Mr. Stone served as dean of the Law School (1987-1994) and Provost of the University of Chicago (1994-2002). After graduating from the University of Chicago Law School in 1971, Mr. Stone served as a law clerk to Justice William J. Brennan Jr. of the Supreme Court of the United States. Mr. Stone has been an editor of the Supreme Court Review since 1991, and is the author or co-author of many books on constitutional law, including Top Secret: When Our Government Keeps Us in the Dark (2007), War and Liberty: An American Dilemma (2007), Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime (2004), Eternally Vigilant: Free Speech in the Modern Era (Chicago 2002), and Sex and the Constitution (2017). Perilous Times received eight national book awards, including the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award and the L.A. times Book Prize for History. His most recent book, Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court, was published January 2020. Mr. Stone is currently chief editor of a twenty-volume series, Inalienable Rights, which is being published by the Oxford University Press. Mr. Stone’s next major book, Sexing the Constitution, will explore the history of sex from ancient Greece to contemporary constitutional law. Mr. Stone is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the national Board of Directors of the American Constitution Society, a member of the national Advisory Council of the American Civil Liberties Union, and a member of of the board of the Chicago Children’s Choir.
 
2Name:  Professor Cass R. Sunstein
 Institution:  Harvard Law School
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1954
   
 
Cass Sunstein returned to Harvard Law School as the Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law in September 2012 after taking a leave to serve for two years in the Obama administration as Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He was named University Professor in February 2013. Sunstein is the most prolific, versatile, and widely cited legal scholar of his generation. His extensive work on administrative law has been profoundly influential, helping to bring insights from cognitive science and behavioral economics to bear on problems of risk analysis and regulation. He has also been among the most influential scholars of constitutional law, developing the insights of civic republicanism and legal realism to show that claims of individual liberty are often better understood as problems of public distribution or social entitlement. Sunstein has written eloquently of the importance of democratic debate and deliberation, and the need to avoid tendencies toward extreme or polarized thought in settings as diverse as juries, appellate panels, and readership on the Internet. A frequent contributor of public legal commentary in venues like the New Republic, Sunstein is well-known for his ability to bring exceptional clarity to complex legal topics, and to integrate legal thought with the latest developments in social science. He is the author of: The Partial Constitution, (1993); Legal Reasoning and Political Conflict, (1996); (S. Breyer, et al) Administrative Law and Regulatory Policy, (1999); (R. Epstein) The Vote: Bush, Gore & the Supreme Court, (2001); The Cost-Benefit State, (2002); Why Societies Need Dissent, (2003); The Second Bill of Rights: Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Unfinished Revolution and Why We Need It More Than Ever, (2006); Infotopia: How Many Minds Produce Knowledge, (2006); Going to Extremes: How Like Minds Unite and Divide, (2009); On Rumors: How Falsehoods Spread, Why We Believe Them, What Can Be Done, (2009); Simpler: The Future of Government (2013), #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media (2017), and Impeachment: A Citizen's Guide (2018). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2010. He won the Society's Henry M. Phillips Prize in 2007 in recognition of his intellectual leadership in Constitutional Law and Political Science, including in particular his profound research and writing demonstrating the complex interplay between jurisprudential constructs and the day by day resolution of legal conflicts. He was also named as a 2018 recipient of the Holberg Prize.
 
3Name:  Mr. Laurence H. Tribe
 Institution:  Harvard Law School
 Year Elected:  2010
 Class:  3. Social Sciences
 Subdivision:  304. Jurisprudence and Political Science
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
Laurence H. Tribe is known both nationally and globally as one of the nation's greatest scholars of constitutional law. His groundbreaking 1978 treatise American Constitutional Law combined historical material with highly original contemporary doctrinal insight, making our nation's constitutional jurisprudence elegantly accessible not only to American students and practitioners but also to the drafters of new constitutions in South Africa and Eastern Europe. The treatise has been so often cited that Harvard Law Dean Erwin Griswold once commented, "It may well be that no book, and no lawyer not a member of the Court, has ever had a greater influence on the development of American constitutional law." An extraordinarily popular teacher of large constitutional law classes at Harvard, Tribe has also published numerous law review articles on virtually every aspect of American constitutional law. His early training as a mathematician has inclined him to reject consequentialist constitutional theories in favor of "structural," "constitutive," and "relational" inferences from the Constitution's internal architecture. Tribe's career has also encompassed dazzling advocacy before the U.S. Supreme Court, a deep commitment to civil rights and civil liberties, and frequent testimony before Congress. He currently serves as Senior Counselor for Access to Justice at the U. S. Department of Justice as well as Carl M. Loeb University Professor (on leave) at Harvard Law School. He received his J.D. in 1966 from Harvard Law School. Other works he has authored include: Channeling Technology Through Law (1973); The American Presidency: Its Constitutional Structure (1974); The Supreme Court: Trends and Developments (1979); God Save This Honorable Court: How the Choice of Supreme Court Justices Shapes Our History (1985); Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes (1990); The Invisible Constitution (2008); with Joshua Matz, Uncertain Justice (2014); and To End a Presidency [2018]. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2010 and has won the Society's 2013 Henry M. Phillips Prize in recognition of his contributions to understanding the United States Constitution and the role of the Supreme Court in its interpretation and its 2018 Henry Allen Moe Prize in recognition of his paper "Reflections on the 'Natural Born Citizen' Clause as Illuminated by the Cruz Candidacy" presented at the Society’s 2016 April Meeting and printed in the June 2017 Proceedings.
 
Election Year
2010[X]