American Philosophical Society
Member History

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Residency
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Resident (23)
Class
4. Humanities[X]
Subdivision
404a[X]
1Name:  Dr. Roger S. Bagnall
 Institution:  New York University; Columbia University
 Year Elected:  2001
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1947
   
 
Roger Bagnall received his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto in 1972. He was assistant professor of classics at Florida State University for two years before moving in 1974 to Columbia University, where he served as professor of classics and history and as dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. In 2007 he became professor of ancient history and Leon Levy Director of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, becoming Director Emeritus in 2016 and professor emeritus in 2017. Among the leading historians of Greek and Roman antiquity, Dr. Bagnall enjoys an immense reputation for his work on Roman and Late Antique Egypt, its economy, and its documents on papyri and potsherds. His technical expertise in papyrology is matched by a historical mind of great range. He has also been a pioneer in the application of computer technology to the humanities. Dr. Bagnall has written or edited more than sixty books and over 250 articles, including The Administration of the Ptolemaic Possessions Outside Egypt (1976); Currency and Inflation in Fourth-Century Egypt (1985); (co-author) Consuls of the Later Roman Empire (1987); Egypt in Late Antiquity (1993); (co-author) The Demography of Roman Egypt (1994); The Kellis Agricultural Account Book (1997); The Oxford Handbook of Papyrology (2009); Everyday Writing in the Graeco-Roman East (2011); An Oasis City (2015); and Roman Egypt (2021). A brilliant and respected administrator as well as an internationally known scholar, Dr. Bagnall has served as director and president of the American Society of Papyrologists, president of the International Association of Papyrologists, and director and president of the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and is a member of the American Numismatic Society, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the British Academy and l'Académie Royale de Belgique. In 2019 Dr. Bagnall was appointed Honorary President for Life of the American Society of Papyrologists and Honorary President of the International Association of Papyrologists. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2001and was elected its President in 2023.
 
2Name:  Professor Mary Beard
 Institution:  Newnham College, University of Cambridge
 Year Elected:  2012
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1955
   
 
Mary Beard is one of Britain’s best-known Classicists - a distinguished Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge where she has taught for the last 27 years. She has written numerous books on the Ancient World, including the 2008 Wolfson Prize-winner, Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town which portrays a vivid account of life in Pompeii in all its aspects from food to sex to politics. Previous books include The Roman Triumph, Classical Art from Greece to Rome and books on the Parthenon and the Colosseum as part of a series on wonders of the world. Her interests range from the social and cultural life of Ancient Greece and Rome to the Victorian understanding of antiquity. In addition Mary is Classics editor of the Time Literary Supplement and writes an engaging, often provocative, blog, A Don’s Life, a selection of which has been published in book form. In 2008 Mary was visiting Sather Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where she gave a series of lectures on Roman laughter, one of her current research interests. In 2011 Mary delivered the prestigious Mellon Lectures at the National Art Gallery, Washington on the imagery of the Caesars. Mary’s academic achievement was acknowledged, in 2010, by the British Academy which elected her as a Fellow and in October 2011 Mary was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as a Foreign Honorary Member. Books: All in a Don’s Day (Profile Books, 2012); The Parthenon (Profile Books, new edition 2010); It's a Don's Life (Profile Books, Nov. 2009); Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town (Profile Books, 2008); The Roman Triumph (Harvard University Press, 2007); The Colosseum (with Keith Hopkins, Profile Books, 2005, new edition 2011); Classical Art from Greece to Rome (with John Henderson, Oxford University Press, 2001); The Invention of Jane Harrison (Harvard University Press, 2000); Religions of Rome (with John North and Simon Price, Cambridge University Press, 1998); Classics: A Very Short Introduction (with John Henderson, Oxford paperbacks, new edition 2000); Rome in the Late Republic (with Michael Crawford, Gerald Duckworth & Co, new edition 2000); S.P.Q.R.: A History of Ancient Rome (2015).
 
3Name:  Dr. Thomas Noel Bisson
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  1975
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1931
   
 
Historian Thomas Bisson has been affiliated with Harvard University since 1986. Prior to becoming Henry Charles Lea Professor of Medieval History there, he taught for twenty years at the University of California, Berkeley and held positions at Swarthmore College, Brown University and Amherst College. He is currently Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. Dr. Bisson's work covers an extraordinary range geographically, from medieval Catalonia and Aragon to Languedoc and northern France and Germany, and topically, from political theory and parliamentary institutions to numismatics and economic history. His many honors include the Creu de Sant Jordi, awarded by the Generalitat de Catalunya in 2001 for contributions to the knowledge of Catalan and Occitan history, and election to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He is also a past president of the Medieval Academy of America, a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a corresponding fellow of the British Academy. Among his recent published works are Medieval France and her Pyrenean Neighbors: Studies in Early Institutional History, Tormented Voices: Power, Crisis and Humanity in Rural Catalonia, 1140-1200, and Cultures of Power: Lordship, Status and Process in Twelfth-Century Europe. His latest books include The Crisis of the Twelfth Century: Power, Landship, and the Origins of European Government (2008) and The Chronography of Robert of Torigni (2020).
 
4Name:  Dr. Ann M. Blair
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2009
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1961
   
 
Ann Blair is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor at Harvard University and a specialist of early modern European intellectual and cultural history. Her interests include the history of science, especially traditional natural philosophy and the relations between science and religion (e.g. in The Theater of Nature: Jean Bodin and Renaissance Science, Princeton University Press, 1997), and the history of education, the history of the book and of methods of working. Her articles include discussions of the methods of note-taking and of responses to overload in early modern Europe (e.g. in Critical Inquiry 2004, and the Journal of the History of Ideas 2003). In her forthcoming book with Yale University Press she examines the role and nature of Latin reference books 1450-1700, in light of earlier models and sources as well as the new resources and challenges that resulted from printing.
 
5Name:  Dr. Glen W. Bowersock
 Institution:  Institute for Advanced Study
 Year Elected:  1989
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Glen W. Bowersock has been Professor of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton since 1980 and Professor Emeritus since 2006. He graduated "summa cum laude" from Harvard University in 1957. Dr. Bowersock received his M.A. and D.Phil. degrees in Ancient History from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College. During his distinguished career at Harvard University from 1962-80, he served as Professor of Classics and History, Chairman of the Classics Department, and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Professor Bowersock has written or edited over a dozen books and published over 300 articles on Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern history and culture as well as the classical tradition in modern literature. He was awarded the James Breasted Prize of the American Historical Association for his book Hellenism in Late Antiquity. Other books include Augustus and the Greek World, Greek Sophists in the Roman Empire, Julian and Apostate, Roman Arabia, Fiction as History, Martyrdom and Rome, Mosaics as History, From Gibbon to Auden: Essays on the Classical Tradition, Empires in Collision in Late Antiquity and Throne of Adulis: Red Sea Wars on the Eve of Islam. With Oleg Grabar and Peter Brown, Dr. Bowersock is co-editor of Late Antiquity: A Guide to the Postclassical World, published in 1999 by Harvard University Press. His Selected Papers on Late Antiquity were published in Italy in 2000. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Institut de France (Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres), the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, and the German Archaeological Institute. He is an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford, and a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1989.
 
6Name:  Professor Peter R. L. Brown
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  1995
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Peter Robert Lamont Brown has transformed our understanding of Mediterranean and Near Eastern culture between Constantine and Muhammad. With imagination and wide-ranging erudition, he has represented as a time of spiritual renewal and cultural interaction what was once considered an age of decline. A speaker of an estimated 26 languages, Dr. Brown has published a wide variety of books and articles, including the early biography Augustine of Hippo (1967), Power and Persuasion in Late Antiquity: Towards a Christian Empire (1992), and Through the Eye of a Needle (2012). Born in Dublin in 1935, Dr. Brown is a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford and has taught at Oxford, the University of London and the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University, a position he has held since 1986.
 
7Name:  Dr. Caroline Bynum
 Institution:  Institute for Advanced Study, Columbia University
 Year Elected:  1995
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1941
   
 
An esteemed scholar, teacher and administrator, Caroline Walker Bynum was born in Atlanta in 1941 and received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1969. She taught at Harvard from 1969-76, at the University of Washington from 1976-88 and at Columbia University from 1988-2003. From 1990-98, she held the Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Chair in History, and in 1999 she became University Professor, the first woman to hold this title at Columbia. From 1993-94 she was also Dean of the School of General Studies and Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Education at Columbia. In 2003 she joined the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, where she is now Professor Emeritus of Western European Middle Ages. Dr. Bynum's areas of expertise include the history of religion, especially late medieval theology, and the relationship between women and the religious vocation in the late Middle Ages. Her articles have won prizes from the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians and the Renaissance Society of America, and her book Holy Feast and Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women (1987) received the Governor's Award of the State of Washington and the Philip Schaff Prize of the American Society of Church History. Her book Fragmentation and Redemption (1991) received the Trilling Prize for the best book by a Columbia faculty member and the Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion: Analytical-Descriptive Category from the American Academy of Religion. Another book, The Resurrection of the Body (1995) received the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize of Phi Beta Kappa given for the best book of the year on "the intellectual and cultural condition of man," and the Jacques Barzun Prize of the American Philosophical Society for the best work in cultural history. Her book Metamorphosis and Identity (2001) explores medieval conceptions of self, survival, and mutability. Her book, Wonderful Blood: Theology and Practice in Late Medieval Northern Germany and Beyond (2007), studies the cult of Christ's blood in its social, political and religious context and was awarded the American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence in historical studies, the 2009 Otto Gründler Prize from the Medieval Institute, and the 2011 Haskins Medal. Her 2011 book, Christian Materiality, focuses on the Christian devotion to the wound in Christ's side. Her latest book is Dissimilar Similitudes: Devotional Objects in Late Medieval Europe (2020). Dr. Bynum has served as president of the American Historical Association and the Medieval Academy of America and has won numerous teaching awards. A MacArthur Fellow from 1986-91, she is also a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America and a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She was elected to the German Orden Pour le Merite fur Wissenschaften und Kunste in 2012 and was awarded the Grand Merit Cross with Star of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in 2013.
 
8Name:  Dr. Angelos Chaniotis
 Institution:  Institute for Advanced Study
 Year Elected:  2023
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1959
   
9Name:  Dr. Kathleen Mary Coleman
 Institution:  Harvard University
 Year Elected:  2021
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1953
   
 
Kathleen Coleman specializes in Latin literature and the social history and material culture of the early Roman empire. She was born in what is now Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1953. After taking degrees at the University of Cape Town and the University of Rhodesia (now the University of Zimbabwe), she received her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 1979. She then returned to the University of Cape Town to join the faculty, before taking up the Chair of Latin (1870) at Trinity College Dublin in 1993. In 1998 she moved to Harvard University, where she was named the James Loeb Professor of the Classics in 2010. She has published editions, with commentary, of Book 4 of the Siluae of Statius and the Liber spectaculorum of Martial, both with Oxford University Press. In tackling the latter project, she undertook an extensive investigation of Roman spectacle and punishment, for which much of the evidence survives in inscriptions and artefacts, rather than in literary sources. The result has been a long series of articles on various aspects of the culture and mentality that fueled the displays of the Roman amphitheatre. The combination of literature, epigraphy, and material culture has become a major focus of her research, leading her to such diverse topics as the ancient schoolroom, Roman mosaics, and the gardens of the Mediterranean world. She has also published articles on sociolinguistic features of Latin texts - specifically on parenthetical remarks in poems composed by Statius to honor his patrons and on bureaucratic language in official correspondence between the younger Pliny and the emperor Trajan - and she has published several studies of classical resonances in the work of the twentieth-century South African poet, Douglas Livingstone. She has delivered lectures on five continents, including the Jerome Lectures at the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (2010), and memorial lectures in honor of Sir Ronald Syme in Wellington, New Zealand (2008) and Oxford (2018). She has held fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (1987-88, 1992), the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2013-14), and the Institute for Advanced Study (2017-18). In 2012 she was elected a Corresponding Member of the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften and in 2020 a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. In 2011 she served as the President of the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) and in 2020 she was elected President of the Internationale Thesaurus-Kommission, the international committee that oversees the publication of the Thesaurus linguae Latinae, which was begun in 1894 and comprises the most comprehensive lexicon of the Latin language ever undertaken. At Harvard, she has received multiple awards for teaching and mentoring: a Harvard College Professorship (2003-08); the Joseph R. Levenson Teaching Prize for Senior Faculty, awarded by the Undergraduate Council (2005); the Phi Beta Kappa Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2019); and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Graduate Student Council (2020). Her greatest ambition is to visit every Roman province.
 
10Name:  Dr. Natalie Zemon Davis
 Institution:  University of Toronto; Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1928
 Death Date:  October 21, 2023
   
 
Natalie Zemon Davis is a social and cultural historian of early modern times. She has written on peasants and artisans in early modern France; on women in Germany, France, the Netherlands and Québec; on criminality and storytelling in sixteenth-century France; on forms of gift-giving in early modern times; and on Muslims and Christians in sixteenth-century Europe. She is the author of eight books, all of them translated into various foreign languages: Society and Culture in Early Modern France; The Return of Martin Guerre (she was also historical consultant for the film Le Retour de Martin Guerre); Fiction in the Archives: Pardon Tales in Sixteenth-Century France; Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives; The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France; Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision; A Passion for History. Conversations with Denis Crouzet; Trickster Travels. A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds. Together with Arlette Farge, she was coeditor of volume 3 (Renasisssance and Enlightenment Paradoxes) of A History of Women, edited by Michelle Perrot and Georges Duby. She has taught at the University of Toronto, the University of California at Berkeley, and Princeton University, where she was Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and Director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies. A former president of the American Historical Association and vice-president of the International Commission of Historical Sciences, she is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a corresponding fellow of the British Academy, and Chevalier de l’Ordre des Palmes Académique. She is the recipient of various prizes (including the 2010 Ludwig Holberg International Prize and the 2012 National Humanities Medal) and honorary degrees, including from Harvard University, the University of Toronto, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Cambridge University, Université de Lyon, Université de Toulouse, and Oxford University. Emerita from Princeton University, Natalie Zemon Davis is currently Adjunct Professor of History and Anthropology, Professor of Medieval Studies, and Senior Fellow in Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Her present research is on slavery and forms of sociability in 18th-century Suriname, including the study of a slave family over four generations and of a Jewish settler family over six generations. She was awarded the 2014 Gold Medal in History from the Amercian Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
11Name:  Sir John Elliott
 Institution:  University of Oxford
 Year Elected:  1982
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Deceased
 Birth Date:  1930
 Death Date:  March 10, 2022
   
 
Sir John Elliott was born in Reading, England, on June 23, 1930. He was brought up in Surrey, where his father was headmaster of a preparatory school, and won a scholarship at the age of thirteen to Eton College. After military service, he went to Cambridge University in 1949 with a scholarship in modern languages but read history at Cambridge, where he won a First Class with distinction in both parts of the Historical Tripos. From 1952-55 he did research in the history of seventeenth-century Spain under the direction of Herbert Butterfield and was awarded a Ph. D. in 1955 for a thesis on the Catalan revolt of 1640, subsequently published in 1963 under the title of The Revolt of the Catalans. On the strength of this thesis he was also elected into a Research Fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge and subsequently was appointed a teaching Fellow of the College and University Lecturer in History. In 1958 he married Oonah Sophia Butler. From 1968-73 he was Professor of History and Head of the History Department of King's College, University of London. In 1973 he and his wife moved to the United States when he was appointed a Professor in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. In 1990 he returned to England following his appointment as Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford, and he held the chair until his retirement in 1997. He is now an Honorary Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, to which the Regius chair is attached, and also of Trinity College, Cambridge. As a historian he has concentrated primarily on Early Modern Spain, Europe and the Americas. Among his publications, in addition to The Revolt of the Catalans, are Imperial Spain, 1469-1716 (1963); Europe Divided, 1559-1598 (1968); The Old World and the New, 1492-1650 (1970); A Palace for a King: The Buen Retiro and the Court of Philip IV, in collaboration with Jonathan Brown (1980); Richelieu and Olivares (1984); The Count-Duke of Olivares (1986); Spain and its World (1989). Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830 was published in 2006. His honors and prizes include the Wolfson Prize for History (1986), the Prince of Asturias Prize for the Social Sciences (1996), the Balzan Prize for History, awarded by the International Balzan Foundation (1999) and the Francis Parkman Prize of the Society of American Historians (2007). Sir John holds several honorary doctorates, and in 1994 was knighted for his services to history. He also holds the Spanish orders of the Grand Cross of Alfonso el Sabio, and of Isabel la Católica.
 
12Name:  Dr. Paul Freedman
 Institution:  Yale University
 Year Elected:  2011
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1949
   
 
Paul Freedman is Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale and was chair of the Department from 2004 to 2007. In 2010-2011 he was acting chair. His field is medieval Europe and he has written on Spain, the church, peasants and most recently on food and luxury products in the Middle Ages. Freedman has taught in the freshman Directed Studies (Great Books) program at Yale and offered courses in the Humanities Department. His History Department courses include lectures on the Middle Ages, a course on the history of food and cuisine, and seminars and a number of topics from the Crusades to the European ideas about Asia and Africa. Graduating from the Santa Cruz campus of the University of California, Freedman received his Ph.D. from Berkeley in 1978. He taught at Vanderbilt University from 1979 until 1997 when he came to Yale. He has received research fellowships from the Cullman Center of the New York Public Library, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as from government cultural agencies in Spain, France and Germany. Freedman is the author of several books on medieval Spain, including The Diocese of Vic (1983) and The Origins of Peasant Servitude in Medieval Catalonia (1992). In 1999 he published Images of the Medieval Peasant which deals with Europe generally and how the vast majority of medieval society were depicted in literature, art and sermons. Yale University Press in 2008 published Freedman’s book Out of the East: Spices and the Medieval Imagination which considers why spices were so popular in the Middle Ages as to become major items of trade and the stimulus to exploration of Asia and the New World. In 2007 Freedman edited Food: The History of Taste, a book about cuisine from prehistoric hunter-gathers until the present-day trends. His recent books include American Cuisine and How It Got That Way (2019).
 
13Name:  Dr. Bruce W. Frier
 Institution:  University of Michigan Law School
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1943
   
 
Bruce Frier is the leading scholar of Roman law in the U.S. today. In a fashion unique among Roman historians, he combines deep traditional philological skills with command of a wide array of methods from the social sciences. His innovative studies have shown how legal developments served the interests of a broad spectrum of propertied Romans and how law became a profession for the first time in history. His casebook on delicts has educated a generation of American students. The foremost demographer of antiquity in this country and the first to bring sophisticated quantitative methods to this subject, Dr. Frier has been a professor of classics at the University of Michigan since 1983.
 
14Name:  Dr. Carlo Ginzburg
 Institution:  University of California, Los Angeles; Scuola Normale, Superiore, Pisa
 Year Elected:  2013
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1939
   
 
Carlo Ginzburg has taught at the University of Bologna, at UCLA, at the Scuola Normale of Pisa. His books, translated into more than twenty languages, include The Night Battles; The Cheese and the Worms; Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method; The Enigma of Piero della Francesca; History, Rhetoric, and Proof; The Judge and the Historian; Wooden Eyes; No Island is an Island; and Threads and Traces. He received the Aby Warburg Prize (1992), the Humboldt-Forschungs Prize (2007), the Balzan Prize for the History of Europe, 1400-1700 (2010).
 
15Name:  Dr. Anthony Grafton
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  1993
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1950
   
 
Anthony Grafton studied history, history of science and classics at the University of Chicago and University College London, where he had a Fulbright Scholarship in 1973-74 and worked with Arnaldo Momigliano. Since 1975 he has taught history at Princeton University, where he is now Henry Putnam University Professor. His books include Joseph Scaliger (1983-93), Defenders of the Text (1991) and The Footnote: A Curious History (1997).
 
16Name:  Dr. Paul F. Grendler
 Institution:  University of Toronto
 Year Elected:  2002
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1936
   
 
Paul Grendler received a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin in 1964. In 1965 he went to the University of Toronto as an assistant professor and remained there throughout his career. He became professor emeritus in 1998. He is the author of Critics of the Italian World, 1530-1560, 1977; The Roman Inquisition and the Venetian Press, 1540-1605, 1977; Culture and Censorship in Late Renaissance Italy and France, 1981; Schooling in Renaissance Italy, 1989; Books and Schools in the Italian Renaissance, 1995; The Universities of the Italian Renaissance, 2002; Renaissance Education Between Religion and Politics, 2006; and The European Renaissance in American Life, 2006. He was Editor in Chief of The Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, 6 volumes, in 1999, and The Renaissance, an Encyclopedia for Students, 4 volumes, in 2004. He was articles editor for Renaissance Quarterly from 2000 to 2003. Paul Grendler is one of the most distinguished American scholars studying the Italian Renaissance. He is as recognized and esteemed in Italy as in North America. His book on Venice and the Inquisition was a pioneering study that has become a classic. His masterpiece, however, is his Schooling in Renaissance Italy, which after all these centuries finally told us what went on in those schools from which secondary education in the Western world was derived. His book on the universities of the Italian Renaissance is the first comprehensive study in any language of all Italian universities between 1400 and 1600 while The European Renaissance in American Life examines how Americans re-create the Renaissance or portray it in fiction and film. His books have won prizes from the American Historical Association, the American Catholic Historical Association, the American Library Association, and the Sixteenth Centuries Studies Conference. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Italian Historical Studies in 1998, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Renaissance Society of America in 2017, and the George E. Ganss, S.J., Award in 2018. Dr. Grendler was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1978-79 and has received many other fellowships. Dr. Grendler was president of the American Catholic Historical Association in 1984, the Renaissance Society of America from 1992 to 1994, and the Society for Italian Historical Studies from 2003 to 2005. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2002.
 
17Name:  Dr. Erich S. Gruen
 Institution:  University of California, Berkeley
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1935
   
 
Erich Gruen is Professor of the Graduate School: Wood Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Born in Vienna, he received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1964 and has taught history at Berkeley since 1966. A Rhodes Scholar and Guggenheim Fellow, Dr. Gruen has established a reputation as a leading international authority on the Roman Republic, its political antecedents in Hellenism, and the impact of both on the Jewish tradition. A master at seeing the macrocosm reflected in the microcosm, Dr. Gruen is the author of numerous articles and works including The Last Generation of the Roman Republic (1974), The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome (1984), Heritage and Hellenism: The Reinvention of Jewish Tradition (1998) and Diaspora: Jews amidst Greeks and Romans (2002). Dr. Gruen is a past president of the American Philological Association (1992) and a member of the American Historical Association and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1986).
 
18Name:  Dr. Benjamin H. Isaac
 Institution:  Tel Aviv University
 Year Elected:  2003
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  International
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1945
   
 
Benjamin Isaac received his Ph.D. from Tel Aviv University in 1980. He remained at Tel Aviv and is currently the Fred and Helen Lessing Professor of Ancient History. His books and his more than 50 articles, book reviews, and contributions to the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, the Anchor Bible Dictionary, and the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World have established him as a leading authority on Roman imperialism, the Roman military establishment, relations with conquered peoples (especially Greeks and Jews), epichoric inscriptions in Greek, Latin, and Hebrew, and the road system of the Near East, especially in Judaea. His current work on Greeks, Romans, and Others deals magisterially with the perceptions of aliens prevalent in the ancient world from Homer to the beginning of the Middle Ages. Numerous honors, participation in international conferences and lectures testify to his international renown. Dr. Isaac's books include (with R. van Royen) The Arrival of the Greeks: The Evidence from the Settlements (1979); (with I. Roll) Roman Roads in Judaea I: The Scythopolis-Legio Road (1982); The Greek Settlements in Thrace until the Macedonian Conquest (1986); The Limits of Empire: The Roman Army in the East (1990, 1992); (with M. Fischer, I. Roll) Roman Roads in Judaea, II: The Jaffa-Jerusalem Roads (1996); The Near East Under Roman Rule: Selected Papers (1998); The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity (2004); and Empire and Ideology in the Graeco-Roman World: Selected Papers (2017). He received the Best Book Award from the American Military Institute in 1991. Dr. Isaac is a member of the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut and the Israel Academy of Sciences & Humanities. He was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2003. He received the Israel Prize in 2008.
 
19Name:  Dr. Christopher P. Jones
 Institution:  Harvard University; Institute for Advanced Study
 Year Elected:  1996
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1940
   
 
Christopher Jones was born in Chislehurst, Kent, England, in 1940, and was educated at Rugby School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he took his B. A. in Literae Humaniores ("Greats") in 1962. He came to the USA on a Henry Fellowship in 1962 and went on to do his Ph. D. at Harvard under Herbert Bloch and Glen Bowersock. He graduated in 1965 and was appointed to the Department of Classics at the University of Toronto, where he remained until 1992. In that year he returned to Harvard with a joint appointment in the Departments of Classics and History, and was named George Martin Lane Professor in 1997. He became emeritus in 2010. His research interests include the literature and history of the Roman imperial and Late Antique periods, and Greek epigraphy. He is the author of several books, most recently Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World (1999) and Philostratus, Life of Apollonius (3 vols., 2005-06). His hobbies include music, the nineteenth-century novel, and travel. In 2011 he was elected to the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres in Paris as a correspondant etranger, and in 2017 he was elected as associe etranger to the same.
 
20Name:  Dr. William Chester Jordan
 Institution:  Princeton University
 Year Elected:  2000
 Class:  4. Humanities
 Subdivision:  404a
 Residency:  Resident
 Living? :   Living
 Birth Date:  1948
   
 
William Chester Jordan received a Ph.D. at Princeton University in 1973 and has remained at Princeton throughout his career. Professor of History since 1986, he also served as director of the Davis Center for Historical Studies from 1994-99. Dr. Jordan is a master medievalist. Beginning as a historian of the state, he has consistently made the development of the central political and social institutions of the great feudal monarchies the core of his work. Thorough investigations in the French national and provincial archives have enabled him to shed new light on classic subjects as diverse as the military organization of the Crusades and the dissolution of serfdom. At the same time, however, he has never lost sight of the many thousands of medieval people who had to forge communities and ways of living outside the central institutions of the great states, and sometimes in sharp opposition to them. His work on the lives of serfs, Jews and women in the Middle Ages applies to new sources, new problems, and unstudied social groups the same expert craftmanship exhibited in his work on serfdom. His book on the famine of the fourteenth century is a still broader account of the social and human consequences of catastrophe. Jordan's wide historical sympathies, remarkable linguistic gifts, and eloquence in speech and writing have won him an international reputation, and his rigorous undergraduate and graduate teaching has led brilliant younger scholars to devote themselves to careers in the field. A list of his publications include Louis IX and the Challenge of the Crusade: A Study in Rulership (1979); From Servitude to Freedom: Manumission in the Sénonais in the Thirteenth Century (1986); The French Monarchy and the Jews from Philip Augustus to the Last Capetians (1989); Women and Credit in Pre-Industrial and Developing Societies (1993); The Great Famine: Northern France in the Early Fourteenth Century (1996); Ideology and Royal Power in Medieval France: Kingship, Crusades and the Jews (2001); Europe in the High Middle Ages (2001); Unceasing Strife, Unending Fear: Jacques de Thérines and the Freedom of the Church in the Age of the Last Capetians, (2005). He won the American Philosophical Society's Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities in 2012 for his lecture on "Count Robert's 'Pet' Wolf." In 2018 he was elected a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. William Chester Jordan was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society in 2000.
 
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