Robert Hare papers, 1764-1858

Mss.B.H22

Date: 1764-1858 | Size: 3 Linear feet

Abstract

Personal and professional correspondence of the chemist Robert Hare, including drafts of letters to editors of journals on such varied topics as fish guano, slaughterhouses, paper money, and the meaning of the term "Yankee annexations." The collection originally contained over 300 scrolls, since disbound, which contained drafts of letters, essays, and lectures, composed by Hare on ordinary sheets of paper, then pasted end to end, and rolled up. The essay and lecture topics include: chemistry, storms, slavery, currency, fire-fighting, capital punishment, railroads, the Smithsonian Institution, Michael Faraday, religion and Spiritualism, riots in Philadelphia, epidemics, underwater blasting, and Ralph W. Emerson; there is some verse. The collection also contains an account book of Hare and his wife, 1806-1829 (180 pp.; B/H22#3); a volume by Hare on Cyclones (tornadoes), n.d. (ca. 60 pp.; B/H22#4); and Samuel Powel, Jr.'s "Short notes on a course of antiquities at Rome... under M. Byre Antiquarian," 1764. (60 pp.).

Background note

Robert Hare (1781-1858, APS 1803) was a chemist best known as an experimentalist and an innovator in the production of chemical apparatus. His inventions include the calorimeter, the deflagrator, and, most significantly, the oxyhydrogen blowtorch. He was Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania for nearly three decades. Toward the end of his life Hare was an outspoken supporter of Spiritualism.

Robert Hare recalled being dandled on the knee of George Washington, an event that seems to have remained in his mind as he grew older, tying him to the fate of his nation and to his position on the privileged end of the social hierarchy. Hare was born in Philadelphia in 1781, the son of Robert Hare, Sr., a major Philadelphia brewer, and Margaret Willing niece, of Thomas Willing, the political leader and president of the Bank of North America.

Hare evidently demonstrated an interest in chemistry from an early age. As a young man, he attended the Academy of the University of Pennsylvania. Possessed of an innate mechanical aptitude, Hare developed a passion for chemistry while attending the lectures of James Woodhouse (1770-1809, APS 1796), and in later years the pairing of instrumental and intellectual prowess made him one of the foremost chemical experimentalists and technical innovators in the nation. Hare was a junior member of the Philadelphia Chemical Society, where his associates and teachers, in addition to Woodhouse, were Joseph Priestley (1733-1804, APS 1785) and the mineralogist Adam Seybert (1773-1825, APS 1797).

Before he turned 20, Hare had begun to experiment toward a method of generating higher temperatures than possible in contemporary furnaces, adapting a keg from his father's brewery to develop an instrument he called the hydrostatic blow-pipe - the oxyhydrogen blowtorch. The blow-pipe proved invaluable in fusing previously infusable metals such as platinum, and, when used by Thomas Drummond to ignite calcium hydroxide, it was found to produce a remarkably bright light that became the preferred medium for lighthouses and the stage, called limelight. The small pamphlet that Hare wrote to describe his invention, Memoir on the Supply and Application of the Blow-Pipe... (1802), brought him international renown when it was republished in the prestigious English Philosophical Magazine and the French Annales de Chimie. He also described his findings in the annual address to the Chemical Society in 1801. Largely on the strength of this single invention, Hare was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1803 and was awarded an honorary medical degree by Yale in 1806. The discovery subsequently made him the first recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences' Rumford Medal in 1839.

Still barely in his majority, Hare continued to work for his father's brewery, devising new, tighter kegs and a modified stop cock. In 1802 he made the acquaintance Benjamin Silliman (1779-1864, APS 1805), Professor of Chemistry and Natural Philosophy at Yale, who had come to Philadelphia to hear the lectures of Woodhouse, Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815, APS 1759), and Caspar Wistar (1761-1818, APS 1787). Hare and Silliman conducted scientific experiments during this and subsequent visits by Silliman; they remained lifelong friends and correspondents.

In 1809, the availability of the chair in chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania vacated by the death of Joseph Woodward opened an opportunity for Hare to turn his full attention to the subject he loved. After he was denied the appointment for lack of a medical degree, Benjamin Rush (1745-1813, APS 1768) intervened to persuade the trustees to create a new position in the Medical School in Natural Philosophy. In 1810 Hare accepted the position, but since his course was listed only as an elective, he had few matriculants, and resigned two years later due to the lack of remuneration.

In 1811 Hare married Harriet Clark, daughter of the merchant John Innes Clark and his wife Lydia Bowen.

Hare returned to his father's brewery, where he entered into a bleak period. Assuming full managerial responsibilities for the brewery following his father's death, Hare ran into financial ruin during the economic chaos of the War of 1812. His efforts to make a living at selling gases and running a druggist's concern in Providence, Rhode Island (where his wife's family resided), were unavailing. His fortunes changed in 1818, when the College of William and Mary offered him a position as Professor of Natural Philosophy and later that same year, when the Medical School at University of Pennsylvania appointed him as Professor of Chemistry. He returned to Philadelphia and remained at the University of Pennsylvania for almost thirty years. Among the many students he worked with Hare during this period were Samuel H. Stout (1822-1903) and Joseph Leidy (1823-1891, APS 1849).

As an instructor, Hare was at his best with advanced students but was generally appreciated for his dramatic demonstrations of chemical principles, often employing apparatus he had developed himself. His Compendium of the Course of Chemical Instruction (1828) went through at least four editions before 1840, and is considered one of the most thorough chemical textbooks in antebellum America. Although he taught chemistry to a large number of medical students, his greatest contributions to his field were as an experimentalist and an innovator in the production of chemical apparatus. Among his most important inventions were the calorimeter (1819), the deflagrator (1821) for producing powerful electrical currents, the litrameter for measuring the specific gravity of fluids, a hydrostatic balance, a cryophorus, and a gas density balance. He was also responsible for isolating elemental boron and silicon, becoming the first American to produce metallic calcium, and was an active researcher in electrical theory and the devising of electrical apparatus. He donated his equipment to the fledgling Smithsonian Institution in 1849, only to have them destroyed by fire years later.

Hare, however, was never only a chemist. He wrote poetry and fiction, including Standish the Puritan (1850), and Overling; or, The Heir of Wycherly (1852), and was a diehard, politically conservative controversialist, describing himself as a "Washington Federalist" well into the 1850s. Beginning with his Defence of the American Character, or, An Essay on Wealth as an Object of Cupidity or the Means of Distinction in the United States (1819), a work that first appeared in the Federalist Port Folio, Hare wrote frequently on banking, finance, currency, tariff, and social order, almost always assailing those principles he identified as "Jeffersonian" or as leading to social-leveling.

Hare was not loath to participate in discussions of the major social issues of his day, including the abolition of slavery and the clash between capital and labor. A firm believer in social hierarchy, he considered himself an antislavery man, though advocating that freed slaves be relegated to a circumscribed subordinate status in American society and compensating slave owners for any losses they incurred. Importing freedmen to the north, he reasoned, would be beneficial to the former slaves - enabling them to be in closer contact with greater numbers of whites - but also financially beneficial to the northern community as a steady supply of cheap labor. A fear of servile insurrection - creating the grounds for another Haiti - led him to adopt an authoritarian stance toward his social inferiors.

Never backing away from scientific controversy, Hare waded into meteorology with an argument that tornadoes were the product of electrical currents in the atmosphere. Most famously, however, in 1854, he took on the task of testing Michael Faraday's theory that Spiritualist table-tilting was the product of involuntary muscular actions. Ever an ingenious mechanic, Hare developed an apparatus he called the Spiritoscope, designed to detect mediumistic fraud, and in the process of testing his machine, he became a Spiritualist convert. His undeniable scientific credentials made him a particularly fortunate believer for the movement, and with the publication of his book, Experimental Investigation of the Spirit Manifestations... (1855), Hare became one of the best known Spiritualists in the nation. Concomitantly, he drew the full wrath of the movement's adversaries. After a public lecture defending Spiritualist investigation before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, he drew calls for his expulsion from the organization, which appear only to have caused Hare to become more retrenchant in his views. However, never an orthodox religionist, his apparent agnosticism or atheism proved as unpalatable to Spiritualists as it did to non-Spiritualists. Nevertheless, he went to his grave with a firm belief that his device could "facilitate intercourse between spirits and mortals."

Hare was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Philosophical Society. He was also an honorary member of the Smithsonian Institution. He died unexpectedly in Philadelphia in May, 1858, leaving behind his wife, Harriet Clark, and six children.

Scope and content

Missing Title
  1. Series I Correspondence, 1764-1858 (6 boxes, 1.5 linear feet)
  2. Series II Scrolls, ca.1845-1858 (6 boxes, 1.5 linear feet)

Digital objects note

This collection contains digital materials that are available in the APS Digital Library. Links to these materials are provided with context in the inventory of this finding aid. A general listing of digital objects may also be found here.

Collection Information

Provenance

Acquired 1961, 1975, 1980.

Preferred citation

Cite as: Robert Hare Papers, American Philosophical Society.

Related material

The Hare-Willing Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.104) contain the correspondence of Hare's family and descendants, including some of notebooks of Hare's and additional correspondence. Hare appears as a correspondent in several other collections, including the Joseph Henry Letters (Mss.Ms.H39p), the Scientists Collection (Mss.509.L56), the C. L. Bonaparte Letters (Mss.B.B642.1.7), and the John Torrey Papers (Mss.B.T63.1).

The Printed Materials Department contains over 100 publications of Hare's from all periods of his career.

The Department of Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania Library contains miscellaneous materials from Hare (see Ms. Coll. 74), along with a thorough collection of his printed works.

Bibliography

Edgar Fahs Smith, The Life of Robert Hare: an American Chemist (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1917). Call no.: B H22s

African American History Note

In a series of essays originally rolled up as scrolls (Series II), Hare asserted that slavery was a positive good for slave, master, and community alike, but argued nevertheless that it be abolished gradually, with full compensation to slave owners, in favor of a free labor system marked by a pronounced racial subordination.

Naval History Note

The Hare Papers contain a few items which may be of interest to naval historians:

Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 1806-1873.
  1. Maury, Matthew Fontaine. Letter to Robert Hare. 1852 January 17. Meteorological questions. 2 pages.
  2. Henry, Joseph. Letter to Robert Hare. 1857 February 3. Concerning Matthew Fontaine Maury and his work on the seas. 2 pages.
United States. Navy.
  1. United States, Department of the Navy. Letter to Robert Hare. 1850 February 14. Manuscript returned in error. 1 page.

Early American History Note

The Robert Hare collection is a large, diverse, and rich collection. The collection contains essays, lectures, and letters to and from Robert Hare, the preeminent chemist in the United States during much of the nineteenth century. But as this collection shows, Hare was far more than a chemist. His essays and lectures touch on an array of topics, including discussions of democracy, currency, history, slavery, among others. The APS collection captures the sophistication of Hare's thought.

Summary(s) of Collection: The Robert Hare Collection is divided into two sections: correspondence and scrolls. The correspondence is primarily a record of Robert Hare's ingoing and outgoing communications from the nineteenth century, but there is also a significant collection of letters from the 1790s from John Innes Clark, Robert Hare's father-in-law, who was a merchant in Rhode Island, and a journal of a trip to Rome made in 1764 and written by an unknown author (possibly Samuel Powel Jr.).

Robert Hare's correspondence touches on matters political, personal, financial, and scientific. There is little correspondence from Hare's early adulthood, when he worked variously in his father's brewery and in Rhode Island as a druggist. Among the earliest documents relating to Hare are two petitions from "the young citizens of Philadelphia of the District of Southwark and Northern Liberties" in 1798 that supported the Adams administration and that Hare was likely involved in organizing (one mentions Charles Hare) and commentary on Jefferson's election in 1800. The correspondence picks up in the 1820s as Hare began to establish himself in the field of chemistry as a professor. The later correspondence often covers his involvement spiritualism.

The scrolls, so named because the Hare combined and rolled up individual lectures, reflect Hare's intellectual and scientific interests. The topics covered in this section are extraordinarily wide ranging. Hare wrote on politics, war, religion, slavery, crime and punishment, railroads, chemistry, meteorology, literature, currency, and science. Such a range of interests reflect the civic activity of an intelligent, prominent, and wealthy reformer in the early republic. Hare's political speeches are often biting and caustic attacks on Jeffersonians and Democrats. In many of these speeches Hare offers his own interpretation of American political history, which reflects Hare's Federalist and Whiggish political outlook.

Finally, the collection includes a personal account book kept by Hare and his wife from 1806-1829. The account book lists the names of those with whom they have conducted business and the records can lend insight into their private consumption and tastes.

Indexing Terms


Genre(s)

  • Business Records and Accounts
  • Educational Material
  • Essays.
  • General Correspondence
  • Lectures
  • Literature
  • Manuscript Essays
  • Poems
  • Scientific Data
  • Sketchbooks
  • Travel Narratives and Journals

Personal Name(s)

  • Bache, A. D. (Alexander Dallas), 1806-1867
  • Bache, Franklin (1792-1864)
  • Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842
  • Dunglison, Robley, 1798-1869
  • Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882
  • Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867
  • Fisher, John, 1806-1882
  • Fisher, Richard
  • Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
  • Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878
  • Kane , John K. (John Kintzing), 1795-1858
  • Kirkbride, Thomas Story, 1809-1883
  • Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 1806-1873
  • Partridge, Charles
  • Powel, Samuel, Jr.
  • Silliman, Benjamin, 1779-1864
  • Silliman, Benjamin, 1816-1885
  • Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854
  • Vaughan, William, 1752-1850

Subject(s)

  • Abolition, emancipation, freedom
  • African American
  • American Philosophical Society
  • Antebellum Politics
  • Antislavery movements -- Pennsylvania
  • Banks and banking -- United States.
  • Blasting, Submarine
  • Blowpipe.
  • Business and Skilled Trades
  • Capital punishment.
  • Chemical apparatus
  • Chemistry
  • Chemists -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
  • Cyclones.
  • Early National Politics
  • Education
  • Electricity -- 19th century
  • Epidemics -- United States
  • Federalist Party -- Pennsylvania
  • Fire extinction
  • Guano
  • Literature, Arts, and Culture
  • Mesmerism
  • Money
  • Paper money -- United States -- 19th century
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) -- Politics and government -- 19th century
  • Race, race relations, racism
  • Railroads
  • Religion
  • Rome (Italy) -- Antiquities
  • Science and technology
  • Slaughtering and slaughter-houses -- United States -- 19th century
  • Slavery -- Pennsylvania.
  • Slaves, slavery, slave trade
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Spiritualism -- Pennsylvania
  • Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 19th century

Collection overview

  

Series I comprises the bulk of the surviving personal and professional correspondence of the great experimental chemist, Robert Hare. Though weak in documenting Hare's early career, the correspondence provides some key insights into his work from the early 1820s through mid-1840s, and more importantly, fleshes out the intellectual context in which Hare operated. The material from the 1790s is related to the business activities of the merchant and politician John Innis Clark of Providence, Rhode Island. (John Innis and Lydia Clark were Robert Hare's in-laws.) The collection also contains facsimiles of various papers by George and Martha Washington, Benedict Arnold, Wythe, and Major Andre (various dates; B H22 no.1); an account book kept by Hare and his wife (180 pp., 1806-1829; B H22 no.3) and a volume by Hare on cyclones (ca. 60 pp., n.d.; B H22 no.4). With the exception of the letters by Uylenbroek (in Latin), Senturner (in German), Dr Gregory (in French), E. Durand, Translation of experiment (in French), APS Meeting extract January 1842 (in French), Robert Hare to Arago (in French), and the undated essay on tornadoes (in French), the material is in English. A typed table of contents is included in the box.

Most of the material relates to Hare's interest in chemistry, including the work he conducted while a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1818 to 1847. Benjamin Silliman recommended Hare for the chair in chemistry in the medical school that had been vacated by the death of Dr. Barton in 1815 (28 December 1815), but Hare was not appointed to a faculty position until several years later. Hare calculated the average income of a professor of chemistry at the university to be $4,560 (Account of students…, 1827-1832). A few letters refer to Hare's disagreement with the University of Pennsylvania over structures he had allegedly erected without proper authorization on university property (February to 1846). Hare resigned his professorship in Chemistry in 1847, a decision that William Rush, a former pupil, regretted (17 May 1847). Hare's donation of his apparatus to the Smithsonian is discussed in his letters with Joseph Henry in the 1850s.

An item that illuminates Hare's work outside of academia is the letter to the mayor of New York, in which Hare explains in detail how he plans to "undertake to reform the management and disposal of the offal of animals which die naturally or are slaughtered within the City of New York" (20 November 1850). An undated essay deals with the prevention of animal carcasses from becoming a nuisance.

Several items relate to the activities of Robert Hare and his father during a visit to London in the spring of 1841. For example, the collection includes a number of tickets to various events – from lectures at the Royal Institution and the Athenaeum to events at the British and Foreign Aborigines Protection Society, to social engagement with various individuals, including Colonel Sykes, and W. H. Guillemard.

The collection includes some material that sheds light on Hare's activities outside of the sciences, including reform causes, financial matters, and politics. Some of these writings were evidently submitted to various newspapers for publication. There are essays and lectures (mostly undated) on a wide variety of topics, such as credit and paper money, religion, electricity, tornadoes, slaughtering houses, Voltaire, slavery, "the Irish and the British," and the mails and the railroads. Hare's interests also include several charitable causes. For example, that Hare was critical of the treatment of Native Americans is evident from a letter and gift sent by Samual Webb. Webb refers to Hare's "eloquent appeal…on behalf of the oppressed Indians; and the manly indignation expressed" by him (29 November 1838). Hare's sympathetic views of the hardships experienced by miners in England are reflected in his letter to Daniel Coxe. Lamenting the high accident and death rate among miners in England, Hare wonders whether it was "not probable that if the labourers had belonged to the proprietors, as our negroes belong to our planters, that more care would have been taken of their lives and limbs" (3 October 1850). Hare's abolitionist sentiments are evident from the undated "Miscellaneous notes on slavery," and his undated proposal to create a registry of "the African race" relates his views on the Fugitive Slave law and related issues.

An interesting item that sheds light on Hare's political sentiments is an essay in which he defends the wearing of black cockades in 1798 against the attacks by Samuel Breck (November 1798). Another item related to political matters in the 1790s are the resolutions adopted by "the young citizens of Philadelphia," in which they praised "the measures pursued by the Executive of the United States, to effect a reconciliation with the Republic of France" (1 May 1798). An address to John Adams conveys these views in greater detail (May 1798). Hare's relentless criticism of Democrats and ardent support for "Federalism" is evident from an essay on the subject he submitted for publication (To the Editors, n.d.). A critical essay on the election of Thomas Jefferson to the presidency of the APS not only points out that in Jefferson's "notes on Virginia, there is nothing too deep for the comprehension of a child," but also accuses Jefferson of "devotion to the weak, ignorant, deluded populace" (1800). An assortment of undated "Miscellaneous notes on political matters" includes additional writings on Federalism, the Whig party, and related topics.

Also of interest is a badge worn in honor of Lafayette's visit in 1824, as well as a letter by E. Campbell in which she refers to the "bustle" caused by the general's arrival in Williamsburg (27 October 1824).

In his later years Hare became an ardent defender of Spiritualism. Items that refer to Spiritualism include a letter by Duncan McKean in which the author discusses "new and more rational views of God and nature than heretofore known" (11 November 1856). A letter by Benjamin Silliman consists of a lengthy appeal to his old friend to abandon Spiritualism. Silliman urges Hare to "view the Christ of History as I do" and "to examine the position you have taken, a position which appears to me full of danger (May 1857). After assuring Silliman that he would carefully consider his points, he explains that he considers "pure Spiritualism and pure Christianity as one." Moreover, he describes several sittings he recently participated in (8 June 1857). Also included in the collection is a letter in which Hare welcomes "another intelligent convert to Spiritualism" [1857], as well as an undated essay titled "Concerning Christianity."

Finally, there are a number of letters related to the business activities John Innes Clark of Providence, Rhode Island, all dated in the 1790s. Clark was the father of Hare's wife Harriet. The correspondence deals mostly with issues related to Clark's activities as a merchant. There is also some material about matters dealing with real estate transactions, and a few letters contain personal information.

  

Originally consisting of sheets of paper affixed end to end and rolled into cylinders, the scrolls appear primarily to be rough drafts of manuscripts or notes for works intended for publication.

The scrolls are an important resource for study of the intellectual conformation of Hare's world. In them, he touches on the full range of his interests, from chemistry and electricity to meteorology, opposition to the Mexican War, viticulture, national politics, social and political duties, slavery, Spiritualism and religion, tariffs, banking, and finance.

A relentless anti-Democrat as much as a Federalist, Hare is a brusk, no-holds-barred writer who seldom shied from controversy in politics, religion, morality or science.



Detailed Inventory

Series I. Correspondence
  

Series I comprises the bulk of the surviving personal and professional correspondence of the great experimental chemist, Robert Hare. Though weak in documenting Hare's early career, the correspondence provides some key insights into his work from the early 1820s through mid-1840s, and more importantly, fleshes out the intellectual context in which Hare operated. The material from the 1790s is related to the business activities of the merchant and politician John Innis Clark of Providence, Rhode Island. (John Innis and Lydia Clark were Robert Hare's in-laws.) The collection also contains facsimiles of various papers by George and Martha Washington, Benedict Arnold, Wythe, and Major Andre (various dates; B H22 no.1); an account book kept by Hare and his wife (180 pp., 1806-1829; B H22 no.3) and a volume by Hare on cyclones (ca. 60 pp., n.d.; B H22 no.4). With the exception of the letters by Uylenbroek (in Latin), Senturner (in German), Dr Gregory (in French), E. Durand, Translation of experiment (in French), APS Meeting extract January 1842 (in French), Robert Hare to Arago (in French), and the undated essay on tornadoes (in French), the material is in English. A typed table of contents is included in the box.

Most of the material relates to Hare's interest in chemistry, including the work he conducted while a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1818 to 1847. Benjamin Silliman recommended Hare for the chair in chemistry in the medical school that had been vacated by the death of Dr. Barton in 1815 (28 December 1815), but Hare was not appointed to a faculty position until several years later. Hare calculated the average income of a professor of chemistry at the university to be $4,560 (Account of students…, 1827-1832). A few letters refer to Hare's disagreement with the University of Pennsylvania over structures he had allegedly erected without proper authorization on university property (February to 1846). Hare resigned his professorship in Chemistry in 1847, a decision that William Rush, a former pupil, regretted (17 May 1847). Hare's donation of his apparatus to the Smithsonian is discussed in his letters with Joseph Henry in the 1850s.

An item that illuminates Hare's work outside of academia is the letter to the mayor of New York, in which Hare explains in detail how he plans to "undertake to reform the management and disposal of the offal of animals which die naturally or are slaughtered within the City of New York" (20 November 1850). An undated essay deals with the prevention of animal carcasses from becoming a nuisance.

Several items relate to the activities of Robert Hare and his father during a visit to London in the spring of 1841. For example, the collection includes a number of tickets to various events – from lectures at the Royal Institution and the Athenaeum to events at the British and Foreign Aborigines Protection Society, to social engagement with various individuals, including Colonel Sykes, and W. H. Guillemard.

The collection includes some material that sheds light on Hare's activities outside of the sciences, including reform causes, financial matters, and politics. Some of these writings were evidently submitted to various newspapers for publication. There are essays and lectures (mostly undated) on a wide variety of topics, such as credit and paper money, religion, electricity, tornadoes, slaughtering houses, Voltaire, slavery, "the Irish and the British," and the mails and the railroads. Hare's interests also include several charitable causes. For example, that Hare was critical of the treatment of Native Americans is evident from a letter and gift sent by Samual Webb. Webb refers to Hare's "eloquent appeal…on behalf of the oppressed Indians; and the manly indignation expressed" by him (29 November 1838). Hare's sympathetic views of the hardships experienced by miners in England are reflected in his letter to Daniel Coxe. Lamenting the high accident and death rate among miners in England, Hare wonders whether it was "not probable that if the labourers had belonged to the proprietors, as our negroes belong to our planters, that more care would have been taken of their lives and limbs" (3 October 1850). Hare's abolitionist sentiments are evident from the undated "Miscellaneous notes on slavery," and his undated proposal to create a registry of "the African race" relates his views on the Fugitive Slave law and related issues.

An interesting item that sheds light on Hare's political sentiments is an essay in which he defends the wearing of black cockades in 1798 against the attacks by Samuel Breck (November 1798). Another item related to political matters in the 1790s are the resolutions adopted by "the young citizens of Philadelphia," in which they praised "the measures pursued by the Executive of the United States, to effect a reconciliation with the Republic of France" (1 May 1798). An address to John Adams conveys these views in greater detail (May 1798). Hare's relentless criticism of Democrats and ardent support for "Federalism" is evident from an essay on the subject he submitted for publication (To the Editors, n.d.). A critical essay on the election of Thomas Jefferson to the presidency of the APS not only points out that in Jefferson's "notes on Virginia, there is nothing too deep for the comprehension of a child," but also accuses Jefferson of "devotion to the weak, ignorant, deluded populace" (1800). An assortment of undated "Miscellaneous notes on political matters" includes additional writings on Federalism, the Whig party, and related topics.

Also of interest is a badge worn in honor of Lafayette's visit in 1824, as well as a letter by E. Campbell in which she refers to the "bustle" caused by the general's arrival in Williamsburg (27 October 1824).

In his later years Hare became an ardent defender of Spiritualism. Items that refer to Spiritualism include a letter by Duncan McKean in which the author discusses "new and more rational views of God and nature than heretofore known" (11 November 1856). A letter by Benjamin Silliman consists of a lengthy appeal to his old friend to abandon Spiritualism. Silliman urges Hare to "view the Christ of History as I do" and "to examine the position you have taken, a position which appears to me full of danger (May 1857). After assuring Silliman that he would carefully consider his points, he explains that he considers "pure Spiritualism and pure Christianity as one." Moreover, he describes several sittings he recently participated in (8 June 1857). Also included in the collection is a letter in which Hare welcomes "another intelligent convert to Spiritualism" [1857], as well as an undated essay titled "Concerning Christianity."

Finally, there are a number of letters related to the business activities John Innes Clark of Providence, Rhode Island, all dated in the 1790s. Clark was the father of Hare's wife Harriet. The correspondence deals mostly with issues related to Clark's activities as a merchant. There is also some material about matters dealing with real estate transactions, and a few letters contain personal information.

Powel, Samuel (1738-1793).
[Samuel Powel?] Short notes on a course of Antiquities at Rome, In Company with Messrs. Apthorp, [John] Morgan and Palmer...
1764D. 1 vol.consisting of 36 leaves, bound with paper covers.box 1
Clark and Nightingale. Agreement with carpenters...
1787 May box 1

Agreement with carpenters, Jon[atha]n Hamon, John Smith and Andrew Cole, for the erection of a house in Providence. Draft.

Clark, Lydia.
Lydia Clark to Colonel Ward
1790 January 1 box 1

L. in 3rd. P. 1p. Asks her to procure a looking lass for her when he goes to England.

Clark and Nightingale Specifications for work on a house
1790? box 1
Lydia Waterman to Lydia Clark
1791 July 16 box 1

Sends yarn spun for her from flax. Asks to be paid for it.

Alexander Hosack. Receipt to John B. Murray
1793 March 14 box 1
John I. Clark? to John B. Murray
1794 January 22 box 1

L. 4p. Draft. Concerning the settlement of an estate.

John Innes Clark to E. H. Robbins
1794 Feb. 6 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Concerning the settlement of an estate.

John Innes Clark to John Ward
1794 Feb. 6 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Concerning the settlement of an estate.

John Innes Clark to Page and Magee
1794 Feb. 13 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Draft. Concerning investments for the triangular trade.

Clark and Nightingale to Colonel William Peck
1794 Feb. 21 box 1

Providence L. 1p. and add., end.: "Copy of a letter..." Notifies him that he must move.

John Innes Clark to Richard Nicholls
1794 March 6 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Draft. Business.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1794 April 5 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Draft. Business. Settlement of an estate.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1794 April 23 box 1

Providence, L. 6p. and end. Draft. Various sizes. Business.

John Innes Clark to William Spooner
1794 April 25 box 1

Providence, A.L.S. 1p. and end.: "Copy..." Sorry they will not purchase his property in Boston.

John Innes Clark to A. Hooper
1794 Nov. 22 box 1

Providence, L. 2p. Draft. Business. On same sheet is copy of letter from J. I. Clark to Mrs. A. Clark Hooper; Nov. 22, 1794.

John Innes Clark to A. Hooper
1794 Nov. 22 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., letter. On same sheet as copy of letter from J. I. Clark to A. Hooper; Nov. 22, 1794.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1794 Dec. 18 box 1

Providence, A.L.S. 2p. and add., end.: "Copy.." Business. Concerning Murray's plans for his [Clark's] son.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1795 Aug. 4 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to John Maclellan
1796 Feb. 12 box 1
John Innes Clark to Oliver Peabody
1796 June 27 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Pays taxes on some lands.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1796 July 11 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1796 Aug. 2 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to John Thurston
1796 Aug. 22 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Stresses the honesty and integrity of some friends who are bankrupt.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1796 Aug. 22 box 1

L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark and J. B. Murray to Robert Bird
1796 Sept. 5 box 1

Providence, L.S. with initials: J. I. C[lark] and J. B. M[urray]. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to John Thurston
1796 Oct. 4 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Asks him to appear at court for Robett Murray.

John Innes Clark to Azur Archbald
1796 Oct. 6 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Inquires for description of prints.

John Innes Clark Promissory note to William Jarvis
1796 Nov. 1 box 1

Boston, D. 1p. and end. Draft. Note for agreements made by John B. Murray, etc.

Roux and Hill. Statement to Mr. Clark
1796 Dec. 22 box 1

Charleston, L. 1p., and end. Mr. [John Innes] Clark for purchase of rum, brandy, etc.

John Innes Clark to Bird, Savage and Bird
1796 Dec. 24 box 1

Charlestown, L. 2p. and end. Copy. Use of funds for relieving a specific house, that of Clark and Nightingale.

Rogers Barker and Lord. Account with Messrs. E. Bowen, Jr., Clark and Nightingale
1797 Jan. 26 box 1

D. 3p. and end.

John Innes Clark to Lydia Clark
1797 Feb. 9 box 1

Providence, L. 2p. and end. Copy. Family news. Friendly letter.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1797 Feb. 20 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business matters are worsening.

John Innes Clark to Thomas Simmons
1797 Feb. 25 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Cannot locate a washing machine for him. Thanks for his kindness while visiting.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1797 March 4 box 1

Providence, L. 2p. Copy. Glad he is going to Europe to help his brother. Plans for the care of his children.

John Innes Clark to Lydia Clark
1797 March 14 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Hopes her trip is helping her. Family news.

Clark and Nightingale to Charles Murray
1797 April 25 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1797 May 4 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark to Lydia Clark
1797 May 8 box 1

Providence, L. 3p. and end. Copy. Hopes she receives the items sent her. News of trade.

John Innes Clark to John B. Murray
1797 May 9 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Business.

Clark and Nightingale to Mr. William Jarvis
1797 May 19 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Forwards note and agress to his plans for payments.

Clark and Nightingale to Captain Benjamin Page
1797 May 29 box 1

L. 1p. and end. Will purchase tea from him.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1797 June 10 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Their chances on a law suit. Business matters.

John Innes Clark and J. B. Murray to William Cargill
1797 July 10 box 1

Providence, L.S.: Jn. I. Clark for self & J. B. Murray. 1p. and end. Copy. Concerning the sale of lands.

John Innes Clark to Robert Murray
1797 July 17 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Business.

John I. Clark to John B. Murray
1797 Oct. 5 box 1

Providence, L. 3p. and end. Copy. News of Robert Murray. Business. Friendly letter.

John Innes Clark to Mrs. John B. Murray
1797 Oct. 8 box 1

Providence, L. 2p., end. Copy. Asks her to hire a female servant for Mrs. Clark.

John Innes Clark to Lydia Clark
1797 Oct. 22 box 1

Providence, L. 3p. and end. Copy. Concerning her health. Family news. Hopes to see her in the spring.

Clark and Nightingale to ---
1797 Nov. 4 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Death of Mr. Nightingale. Sale of the property of the firm must await further action.

Thomas Cole. Promissory note to John Innes Clark
1797 Nov. 6 box 1

Providence, D.S. 1p. and end.

John Innes Clark to Jonathan Hastings
1797 Nov. 9 box 1

Providence, L. 1p. and end. Copy. Business.

John Innes Clark. Receipt to John Clark Nightingale
1797 Nov. 13 box 1

Providence, D. 1p. Copy.

John Innes Clark. Agreement with Jonathan Hastings
1797 Nov. 14 box 1

D. 2p., end.

Philadelphia Citizens. Resolutions...
1798 May 1 box 1

D. 2p. and end. Resolutions approving of the actions of John Adams as president of the United States.

Philadelphia Citizens to John Adams...
1798 box 1

L. 2p. and end. Approves his actions as president.

Robert Murray to John Innes Clark
1802 Sept. 25 box 1

Boston, L.S. with initials. 1p. and add. Business. Glad to hear Mrs. Clark is safely home.

John Prince to John I. Clark
1803 June 30 box 1

Boston, A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Forwards "philosophical apparatus" etc. for the college and various persons.

Robert Hare. Verses addressed to Margaret Willing Hare
1804 Jan. 15 box 1

[finished]. D.S. 2p. and end. For Mrs. Hare's birthday.

W. H. Blodget to Robert Hare
1805 Feb. 21 box 1

St. Marks, A.L.S. with initials. 4p. News of his adventures on board ship and attempts at selling.

Robert Hare. Verses to Margaret Willing Hare
1807 Jan. 15 box 1
Robert Hare "Analysis of moral sentiments"
1808 May 7 box 1

D. 14p.

Alternate formats available: Printed: Port Folio, vol.XIX, [May 7, 1808], pp.295-300.

Robert Hare Verses to his wife Margaret Willing Hare
1809 Jan. 15 box 1

D. 1p. and end.

Agreement concerning the John Innes Clark Estate
1811 July 29 box 1

Concerning the John Innes Clark estate in Tennessee. D.S.: Lydia Clark and 5 others. On same sheet is letter from Josiah Nichol to Robert Hare; May 31, 1820.

Robert Hare to William Cooke
1812 Feb. 26 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L. 2p. Draft. Concerning the estate of W. H. Blodget. On same sheet is copy of letter from Hare to William Cooke; March 3, 1812.

Robert Hare to William Cooke
1812 March 3 

A.L. 1p. Draft. Concerning the estate of W. H. Blodget. On same sheet as copy of letter from Hare to Cooke; Feb. 26, 1812.

Hope and Co. to Robert Hare
1814 May 9 box 1

Philadelphia; Amsterdam, L. 1p. Duplicate. Business.

Benjamin Silliman to William Meredith
1815 Dec. 28 box 1

New Haven, A.L.S. 4p., add. Concerning the chair of chemistry at Penn and his recommendation of Hare for it.

Thomas Cadwalader to Robert Hare
1818 May 25 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 3p. and edd., end. Cannot see Mr. Corbin. Concerning his appointment at Penn.

Josiah Nichol to Robert Hare
1820 May 31 box 1

Nashville, A.L.S. 1p. and add. Forwards material on the J. I. Clark estate in Tennessee. On same sheet with "Agreement concerning the John Innes Clark Estate," 1811 July 29.

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
1820 August 29 

Regarding a publication.

Robert Hare to Granville Sharpe Pattison
1820 Nov. 17 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Copy. Did not preserve his cousin's letter.

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
1821 Jan. 20 

Is sending apparatus and a copy of his memoir.

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
1821 Jan. 30 

Regarding engravings.

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
1821 Feb. 23 

Is planning to send apparatus. Did some experiments.

M. Hare to Robert Hare
1821 June 6 box 1

Shrivenham, England, L. 4p. Family news. Distributed his scientific pamphlets. Quotes letter of Buckland about his invention of the gas blow-pipe.

Robert Hare to Parker Cleaveland
1821 July 20 box 1

Providence, A.L.S. 4p., end. Copy. Describes his newly invented apparatus and tells him where to purchase the glass.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1821 Dec. 19 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add., end. Has drawn on him for $153.30.

Henry Gardiner to Robert Hare
1822 March 2 box 1

A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Possible sale of newly created varnish.

John Morgan. Shipping receipt to Robert Hare
1822 March 18 box 1

Philadelphia, Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 1p. and end. Receipt to Robert Hare for shipment of minerals to A. Moquiart, La Havre, France.

John D'Wolf to Robert Hare
1822 May 1 box 1

Providence, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Is glad he can purchase the chemical apparatus and wishes it shipped to Brown University.

Robert Hare to Elisha De Butts
1822 June 9 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L. 3p. and end. Draft. Concerning their discussions on a matter for lecturing students and Dr. Physick's advice.

William J. Macneven to Robert Hare
1823 March 28 box 1

A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Lists his chemical apparatus, one item of which he acquired from Peale's museum.

Robert Hare to Jean Frédéric Daniel Lobstein
1823 April 28 box 1

A.L.S. 2p., end. Draft. Apologizes for not having thanked him before now for the kind gift of his publication.

William W. Stewart to Robert Hare
1823 May 14 box 1

Winchester, Tenn., A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Asks him to analyze some ores.

Robert Hare to Jullien de Paris
1823 May 19 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 3p. and end. Draft. Wishes to correspond with him. Sends some publications on his inventions of apparatus, especially the gas blow-pipe.

Robert Hare to Louis Jacques Thenard
1823 May 19 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L. 2p., end. Draft. Introduces himself and sends publications proving his priority in the invention of the gas blow-pipe.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1823 Oct. 6 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add., end. Cannot fill his order immediately and cannot quite prices.

Robert Hare to John Markoe
1823 Nov. box 1

A.L.S. 1p. and end. Draft. Ready to pay ground-rent.

Robert Hare to Joseph L. Tillinghast
1824 March 173 p.box 1

Philadelphia. Would like to transfer some business which Hare has had in Providence, concering the litigation between Hare and Mr. Clark.

Provenance: 2000 - 706ms. Purchased from Steve Resnick, July 2000

Mrs. Lenox to Robert Hare
1824 July 29 box 1

Bristol, Pennsylvania. A.L. in 3rd. P. 1p. and add., end. Concerning a servant.

Robert Hare to Major Lenox
1824 July 31 box 1

Regarding a servant who had made application. Response to letter of July 29.

Badge worn...in honor of La Fayette
1824 Sept. 28 box 1
John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1824 Oct. 20 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add., end. His order is not yet completed for his apparatus.

John and Richard Fisher. Receipt for shipment of materials to Robert Hare
1824 Oct. 25 box 1

New York, L. 2p. and receipt for shipment for material to Dr. Hare, and add., end. Material for his chemical apparatus.

E. Campbell to Harriet Clark Hare
1824 Oct. 27 box 1

Williamsburg, A.L.S. 2p. and add. News of the college and town.

William Coxe to Robert Hare
1824 Nov. 10 box 1

Burlington, N.J., A.L.S. 1p. and add. Ships cider.

William Channing Woodbridge to Robert Hare
1824 Dec. 2 box 1

Liverpool, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Signature mutilated. Has arrived safely and proposes to visit London and then the Continent.

J. B. Quinby to Robert Hare
1824 Dec. 18 box 1

Boston, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Concerning the idea of using coal to make iron.

Samuel Brown to Robert Hare
1825 Jan. 15 box 1

Lexington, A.L.S. 6p. and add. Proposes study of the human body to see if electrical properties might not account for various organs functioning the way they do.

Peter Falinestock to Robert Hare
1825 Jan. 15 box 1

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. and add. Is student, faces financial difficulties, asks refund for the unused portion of his tickets.

American Sunday School Union. Receipt to Robert Hare
1825 May 19 box 1

D. 1p. and end. For life membership.

M. Hare to Robert Hare
1825 July 20 box 1

Shrivenham, England, A.L.S. 4p., and., end. From his aunt. Is proud of his and all he has accomplished.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1825 Aug. 13 box 1

New York, L. 2p. and add., end. Plant is being enlarged but will be in operation within 6 weeks.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1825 Sept. 10 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add., end. Need his drawings in order to execute his order.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1825 Sept. 28 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add. end. Will begin making his chemical apparatus about Oct. 4.

John and Richard Fisher to Robert Hare
1825 Oct. 31 box 1

New York, L. 1p. and add., end. Working on his chemical apparatus.

J. and R. Fisher. Shipping receipt to Robert Hare
1825 Nov. 12 box 1

New York, Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. and list of chemical apparatus on same sheet.

James De Groot. Receipt to Robert Hare
1826 March 17 box 1

A.D.S. 1p.

Benjamin Silliman to Robert Hare
1826 May 11 box 1

New Haven, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Concerning his article on the blowpipe.

Harriet Clark Hare to Bishop Chase
1827 Feb. 28 box 1

Philadelphia, L. in hand of Robert Hare(?). 3p. and end. Draft. Gift of monies to the school from her mother (Mrs. Lydia Clark).

Robert Hare to Joseph L. Tillinghast
1827 June 141 p.

Philadelphia. Would prefer to settle his account with Tillinghast so that he may know how to settle with Mr. Clark. Includes notes about Tillinghast's retaining fee.

Provenance: 2000 - 706ms. Purchased from Steve Resnick, July 2000

Robert Hare. Account of student fees...
1827 Aug. - 1831 Feb. box 1
Wilson, James P.(James Patriot.
James P. Wilson to Robert Hare
1828 Dec. 25 box 1

A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Critical remarks on his publication on chemistry.

Robert Hare to Dr. Wilson
1828 Dec. 31 box 1

A.L. 4p. Draft. Also, draft in different version. 3p. and end. Concerning his publication on chemistry.

M. Hare to Robert Hare
1829 April 21 box 1

Shrivenham, England, A.L.S. 4p., add. From his aunt. Thanks for publication. Her medical lore. Friendly letter.

Gale, Leonard Dunnell, 1800-1883.
L. D. Gale to Robert Hare
1831 Jan. 24 box 2

New York, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Seal. Chemical experiments.

Benjamin Silliman to Robert Hare
1832 April 4 box 2

New Haven, A.L.S. 2p., end. and add. Concerning publications concerning Hare and some of his experiments.

Robert Hare to Mr. Pillow
1832 Aug. 20 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. and add. and end. Complains of a servant.

Uylenbroek, Petrus Johannes.
P. J. Uylenbroek to Robert Hare
1833 Dec. 21 box 2

L. 1p. and end. In Latin. Proposes exchange of publications with the APS and the Rijksuniversiteit of Leyden.

Samuel Haydock to Robert Hare
1834 Sept. 1 box 2
Robert Hare to Samuel Haydock
1834 Sept. box 2

A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Draft. Attempts an explanation for the collapse of a copper vessel.

Samuel Haydrock to Robert Hare
1834 Nov. 1 

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Asks explanation for collapse of a copper vessel used as water cooler.

Sev Lorig to Robert Hare
1834 Nov. 25 box 2

New York, L. 2p. and add., end. Concerning the shipment of publications and letters. Refers to the APS and Berzelius.

Robert Hare to Johan Jakob Berzelius
1835 July 20 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L. 3p. and end. Copy. ----Copy. Mutilated. 16x10. Chemical subjects. Refers to Silliman.

J. S. Rose to Robert Hare
1835 Dec. 8 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Effects of electricity on diseases.

Robert Hare. Statement of sums paid to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania by the medical faculty
ca.1835? box 2

A.D. 1p. and end. Draft.

Humbert, Jonas, 1784-1849.
Jonas Humbert, Jr. to Robert Hare
1836 Feb.12 box 2

New York, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Asks him if he would perform an experiment using electricity, hydrogen, and oxygen.

Franklin Bache. List of APS Members in Europe
1836 April 21 box 2

Philadelphia, D.S. 1p. and end. Addressed to Dr. Hare. List of American Philosophical Society members in Europe, not known to be living or dead. Asks Hare to see if such people are still alive, while he is in Europe.

Robert Hare to Alexander Dallas Bache
1836 April 25 box 2

L. 1p. and end. Copy. Asks him to correct errors in a new edition of his text-book.

Beck, Lewis C. (Lewis Caleb), 1798-1853.
Lewis C. Beck to Robert Hare
1836 April 29 box 2

New Brunswick, A.L.S. 4p. Describes a tornado.

Bostock, John, 1773-1846.
J. Bostock to Robert Hare
1836 July 30 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. Cannot ask him to visit, since the house is being painted, but hopes to see him anyhow.

Stevenson, Alan, 1807-1865.
A. Stevenson to Robert Hare
1836 Aug. 10 box 2

L. 2p. Has obtained permission for him to sit in either the House of Commons or the Galleries there.

Robert Hare to Messrs. Enderby
1836 Aug. 14 box 2

Windsor, England, A.L.S. 1p. end end. Copy. Orders chemical.

Martha Hare to Robert Hare
1836 Sept. 29 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and end. Concerning the Hare family.

U. of Virginia. Report on R. H. Hare...
1836 Dec. 1 box 2
Charles Daubeny to Robert Hare
1836 Dec. 16 box 2

A.L.S. 4p., add., end. Concerning the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Friendly letter.

U. of Virginia. Report on R. H. Hare...
1837 Jan. 1 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. and add., end.

J. Purcell to Robert Hare
1837 Feb. 15 box 2

Lancaster, A.L.S. 2p. and add. Has discovered a sovereign remedy for poisons and wishes to set up agents in the U.S. for the sale of it. Asks his advice.

U. of Virginia. Report on R. H. Hare...
1837 March 1 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. and add., end.

Morris, Stephen P. (Stephen Paschall), 1800-1865.
Stephen P. Morris to Robert Hare
1837 March 2 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Asks questions concerning the making of iron.

U. of Virginia. Report on R. H. Hare...
1837 April 1 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. and add., end.

U. of Virginia. Report on R. H. Hare...
1837 May 1 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. and add., end.

Meredith, William M. (William Morris), 1799-1873 .
W. M. Meredith to Robert Hare
1838 July 17 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Forwards check from Otis Allen.

Sullivan, William, 1774-1839.
William Sullivan to Robert Hare
1838 Aug. 6 box 2

Newport, R.I., A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Concerning education. Friendly letter.

Samuel Webb to Robert Hare
1838 Nov. 29 box 2

L.S. 1p. and add. Asks him to accept a history of the Pennsylvania Hall, since part of it is dedicated to the Indians.

Other Descriptive Information: Freeman Guide 1492.

Thomas Senturner to Robert Hare
1839 June 18 box 2

Hameln, L.S. 2p. and add., end. In German. Thanks for publication. Concerning publication of Liebig. Friendly letter.

Robert Hare. Concerning boilers and steam-boats
1839? box 2

A.D. 4p. and end. Various sizes.

Pass to Mr. Droop and Friends...
1840 June box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. Pass for the St. Katharine Docks, London.

Alexander, John, 1792-1868.
John R. Alexander to Miss Hare
1840 July 20 box 2

Ryde England, A.L.S. 2p. and P.S. by [John Innes Clark Hare?]. Wishes they could be together. Family speaks of her.

Sally E. Hare. Power of attorney to Robert Hare
1841 March 30 box 2

D.S. 1p. Witnessed: I.P.Hutchinson and Robert Harford Hare.

M. Hare to Robert Hare
1841 April 9 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p., add. Death of Harrison and acts of Tyler. Friendly letter.

Miss Hare to Robert Hare
1841 April 30 box 2

A.L.S.: Your affectionate, Daughter, 4p., add. Friendly letter of family and friends.

Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854.
Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 6 box 2

A.L. in 3rd. P. 2p. and add. Reminds him of an engagement to take tea with him.

Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854.
Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 6 box 2

A.L.S. 3p. Will introduce him to the Zoological Society on Tuesday evening.

A.P. Gibson to Robert Hare
1841 May 7 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and add. Informs him of how to board a particular vessel.

Vaughan, William, 1752-1850.
William Vaughan. Ticket of admission...
1841 May 7 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 1p. Ticket of admission to the Royal Institution for Robert Hare.

Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854.
Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 7 box 2

A.L.S. 3p. Friendly letter. Hopes to provide him with tickets to a fete.

Vaughan, William, 1752-1850.
William Vaughan. Pass...
1841 May 7 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 1p. Ticket of admission to the Royal Institution for Robert Harford Hare.

Acland, Thomas Dyke, Sir, 1787-1871.
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland to Robert Hare
[1841] May 10 box 4

A.L.S. 4p. Hopes to meet and tries to get a seat for him in Commons.

Vaughan, William, 1752-1850.
William Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 12 box 2

L.S. 1p. Invites him to tea.

M. Wellesley to Robert Hare
[1841] May 12 box 4

A.L.S. 2p. Hopes to see him when he returns to town next week.

Robert Addams to Robert Hare
[1841] May 13 box 4

Kensington [London], A.L.S. 2p. Concerning his chemical apparatus. Says Faraday uses it.

C. Hare to Robert Hare
[1841] April 13  box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p., add. Concerning the uproar over the bank and Biddle. News of the country.

Letter to Robert Hare
[1841] April 25 box 4
Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854.
Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 14 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. Sends ticket to the Sloane museum.

William Vaughan. Pass...
1841 May 14 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 2 items. Tickets of admission to [Robert Hare] to attend the Royal Institution.

Mr. Murray to Robert Hare
[1841] May 17 box 4

L. in 3rd. P. 1p. Refers him to another editor for his article.

British and Foreign Aboriginies' Protective Society. Ticket of admission...
1841 May 17 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. 1p. Ticket of admission for the reserved seats gallery.

London Athenaeum to Robert Hare
1841 May 18 box 2

London, Printed L. filled in in ms. S.: Edw[ar]d Magrath, Secy. Offers him courtesy of the Athenaeum for two months.

Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867.
Michael Faraday. Ticket of admission...
1841 May 21 box 2

Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 1p. Ticket of admission to the Royal Institution for Dr. [Robert] Hare.

Henry Grotton to Mr. Powell
1841 May 24 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. Returns books.

Sykes, Colonel (William Henry), 1790-1872.
Colonel Sykes to Robert Hare
1841 May 24 box 2

A.L. in 3rd. P. 1p. Invitation to dinner.

Guillemard, William Henry, 1815-1887.
William Guillemard to Robert Hare
1841 May 26 box 2

A.L. in 3rd. P. 1p. and add. Could not meet him at Ogilby's, but proposes a week-end in the country.

Pass for admission of A. G. Ralston to Apsley House
[1841] May 26, 27 box 4
William Stuart to Robert Hare
1841 May 27 box 2

Liverpool, A.L.S. 1p. and add. Must know the date of his sailing, else he cannot secure passage. Lists cost on the Cunard line.

Robert Graham to Robert Hare
1841 May 29 box 2

Edinburgh, A.L.S. 3p. Thanks him for his publications on chemistry and tornadoes. Refers to Faraday and W. Vaughan.

Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 May 29 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and add. Business. Asks him to hear the "Charity Children at St Pauls" next Tuesday.

M. A. Wellesley to Robert Hare
[1841] May 29 box 4

A.L.S. 3p. Has been ill but is better, so asks that he call at 2:00 tomorrow.

Reid, D. B. (David Boswell), 1805-1863.
D. B. Reid Pass...
1841 May box 2

Printed D.S. with initials: D.B.R. 2p. Ticket of admission to hear a lecture on the chemistry of the air.

Gutch, John Wheeley Gough, 1809-1862.
J. W. G. Gutch to Robert Hare
1841 June 1 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. Acknowledges receipt of his papers for the meteorological society.

Vaughan, Petty, 1788-1854.
Petty Vaughan to Robert Hare
1841 June 1 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. Refers to Professor Graham's receipt of the package.

Fitton, William Henry, 1780-1861.
William Henry Fitton to Robert Hare
1841 June 1 box 2

A.L. in 3rd. P. 3p. Asks him to meeting of the Geological Society, where he will be introduced.

John Guillemard to Dr. Hare
1841 June 2 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. and add. Sorry they did not meet, but he had misdirected his letter.

Robert Hare to W. R. Gwin?
1841 June 4 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. Concerning the shipment of chemical apparatus.

W. R. Gwin (?) to Robert Hare
1841 July 3 box 2

L. 1p. and add. Will ship chemical equipment.

Robert Hare to Dominique François Jean Arago
1841 Sept. 16 box 2

L. 12p. In French. Draft. Concerning his work on chemistry, electricity, etc. Refers to the APS.

Robert Hare to Count Anatol Demidorff
1841 Sept. 21 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. Copy. His process of converting platina. On same sheet is letter from F. Campbell Stewart to Hare; Oct. 26, 1841.

F. Campbell Stewart to Robert Hare
1841 Oct 26 

Paris, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Has taken care of the parcels and articles he forwarded for dispersal. Forwards copy of letter to Demidorff. On same sheet as letter from Hare to Demidorff; Sept. 21, 1841.

I. J. Chapman to Robert Hare
[1841] box 4

Thursday. A.L.S. 3p. and add. Encloses orders to get him into meetings of some societies.

William Ogilby to Robert Hare
[1841] box 5

A.L.S. 2p. Invitation to dinner.

Chevalier De Gregory to Robert Hare
1842 Jan. 16 box 2

Paris, L.S. 3p. and add. In French. Concerning birds of America.

American Philosophical Society.
A.P.S. Meeting (Extract)
1842 Jan. 21 box 2

D. 3p. In French. Abstract of a minute, concerning an oral communication made by Dr. Hare.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed (in English): APS Proceedings, vol. 2, 142-143.

Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.
William E. Channing to Robert Hare
1842 March 2 box 2

Boston, A.L.S. 3p. and add. Asks his opinion of his son, William Channing. Invites him to Boston. Refers to Silliman.

American Philosophical Society.
A.P.S. Minute of communication made by Robert Hare
1842 April 1 

D. 3p. and end. In French. Translated by E.Durand.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed: APS Proceedings, II, 161-162.

Other Descriptive Information: Not located 4/2010

E. Durand. Translation of experiment...
1842 May 27 box 2
Robert Hare to Count [George, i.e., Igor Frankovitch?] Cancrin
1842 May 29 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p., end. Copy. Analyses of ores for platinum, etc. ----Copy. 4p., end. 10x8.

Robert Hare to Arthur (?) and Thomas Dyke Acland
1842 Sept. 29 

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. Concerning the forwarding of a pamphlet of his to them.

Other Descriptive Information: Formerly B H22.3.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1843 Oct. 18 box 2

A.L.S. 4p., add., end. Concerning some of his recent publications containing theories of galvanism.

R.Hare Concerning Samuel Breck... "Black Cockade"
1843 Nov. box 2

D. 14p. ----Partial copy. 1p. For Breck item, see: Breck. Historical Sketch...paper money. Concerning Samuel Breck and his comments on the wearers of the "Black Cockade", in his speech on Continental Currency, before the APS.

Robert Hare to Dr. Staples
1844 Aug. 15 box 2

New York, A.L.S. 3p. and add., end. Cannot run for office in politics. Is for stricter naturalization laws.

John J. Kane to Robert Hare
1844 Nov. 22 box 2

Sing Sing, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Thanks for information for placing lightning rods on his dwelling.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to "Fellow Citizens"
1844 box 2

L.S.: Washington. 2p. and end. To the Inquirer. Essay on patriotism, signed "Washington".

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the election of a president for the APS
[1844?] 
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to ---
1845 May 8 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L. 1p. Draft. Concerning platinum.

Durant, C. F. (Charles Ferson), 1805-1873 .
C. F. Durant to the Mayor of New York
1845 Sept. 2 box 2

Printed L. 6p. and end. by R.Hare. Concerning the explosion.

University of Pennsylvania. Trustees.
U. of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees to Robert Hare
1845 Dec. 8 box 2

A.L.S.: Geo: Emlen, Jr. 1p. Concerning some alterations he made on his property which impinges on the University property.

Foot and Davies to Robert Hare
1845 Dec. 31 box 2

New York, L. 1p., end. Concerning court decree on the J. I. Clark estate.

Emlen, George, 1784-1850.
George Emlen to Benjamin W. Richards
1846 Feb. 9 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and add. Lists alleged encroachments made upon University property by Robert Hare.

Robert Hare to B. W. Richards and William Rawle
1846 Feb. 25 box 2

L.S. 5p., end. Concerning his alleged encroachments on University property.

University of Pennsylvania. Trustees.
U. of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees to Robert Hare
1846 March 3 box 2

L.S.: Geo[rge] Emlen, Jr. 2p. Concerning his encroachments on University property.

University of Pennsylvania. Trustees.
U. of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees to Robert Hare
1846 March 7 box 2

A.L.S.: Geo[rge] Emlen, Jr. 1p. and add. Forwards papers.

Robert Hare to ---
1846 May 

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. Draft(?). Concerning giving a lecture about his life and work, including his positions at William and Mary and Pennsylvania.

Provenance: Purchased with 509:L56, October 3 1961.

Other Descriptive Information: Formerly B H22.1.

James S. Gwynne. Description of his patented process...
1846 Sept. 3 box 2

D. 3p. and end. Description of his patented process of extracting stearic acid.

Silliman, Benjamin, 1816-1885.
B. Silliman, Jr. to Robert Hare
1846 Sept. 28 box 2

New Haven, L.S. 2p. and P.S. by B. Silliman, Sr., end. Thanks for his commendation, for he was given the position.

Wightman, Joseph M. (Joseph Milner), 1812-1885.
Joseph M. Wightman to Robert Hare
1846 Oct. 6 box 2

Boston, A.L.S. 2p., end. and add. Concerning Arago's polariscope.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1846 Dec. 29 box 2

Princeton, A.L.S. 4p., end. Concerning the Smithsonian and his office there. Concerning Hare's manuscript on the constitution of matter.

Robert Hare to H. C. Beck
1847 April 23 

A.N. in 3rd per. 1p. Hopes to avail himself of H. C. Beck's invitation for Saturday next.

Rush, William, 1801-1864.
William Rush to Robert Hare
1847 May 17 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p., end. Praises him as a teacher of chemistry and is sorry he has resigned from the University.

William De Benst to Robert Hare
1847 July 15 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. and add., end. Wishes to know where to put his chemicals and equipment which are now at present at the University.

Horsford, Eben Norton, 1818-1893.
Eben N. Horsford to Robert Hare
1847 July 29 box 2

Cambridge, A.L.S. 4p. Answers question dealing with chemistry.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to the Editor of the American Journal of Science
1848 April 8 box 2

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Draft. Attacks a man's article on his misinterpretation his article on tornadoes.

Franklin Institute. Resolutions pertaining to Dr. Hare's deposit...
1848 May 17,18 box 2

D.S.: Will[ia]m Hamilton. 1p. Resolutions pertaining to Dr. Hare's deposit of his electrical machine and blow-pipe for melting platinum.

Thos. A. White to Robert Hare
1848 Sept. 24 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Asks him to return books.

Walter R. Johnson to Robert Hare
1848 Sept. 25 box 2

Philadelphia, printed L. with P.S. in initials. 3p. and add. Lists members of the AAAS.

Thomas H. White to Robert Hare
1848 Oct. 20 box 2

A.L.S. 2p., end. and add. Religion.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1848 Nov. 16 box 2

Washington, A.L.S. 2p., end. Has received his gift of chemical apparatus and wants a letter of donation.

W. Barker to Thomas Hazard
1849 Jan. 14 box 2

Portsmouth, A.L.S. 1p., end. Estimation of total catch of fish in Rhode Island and its sale.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1849 Jan. 19 box 2

Washington, A.L.S. 4p., end. Concerning his gift of apparatus to the Smithsonian. Will study his article on credit.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1849 January 30 box 2

Washington, A.L.S. 1p., end. Asks to borrow books on chemistry.

Anthony and Emerson to Robert Hare
1849 Feb. 18 box 2

Philadelphia, L. 1p., end. and add. Forwards a churn and asks for the results of his experiments on it, if he will be so kind.

John Wilkinson to Robert Hare
1849 May 11 box 2

Germantown, Pennsylvania, A.L.S. 2p., end. Concerning plows and fertilizers.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1849 Aug. 1 box 2

L.S.: Joseph Henry. 1p. Notifies him of election to honorary membership.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1849 Oct. 26 box 2

L.S.: Joseph Henry. 1p., end. Concerning the shipment of his chemical apparatus and evaluation of it.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1849 Dec. 15 box 2

A.L.S. 1p. Concerning the shipment of his chemical apparatus to the Institution.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to ----
1850 Jan. 27 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L. 2p. Draft. Inquires as to attempts to recover nitrogen form the air, for fertilizer.

William A. Tatem to Robert Hare
1850 Jan. 31 box 3

A.L.S. 2p., end. and add. Pays for lectures at the University taken years before.

Etheridge, John.
John Etheridge to Robert Hare
1850 Feb. 14 box 3

A.L.S.: Jo[h]n Etheridge. 1p., end. From U.S. Navy Department. His manuscript was returned by error.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Joseph Henry
1850 April 14 box 3

Philadelphia, L.S. 3p. and end. Concerning sparks from flint and steel and those from quartz.

John Rehn to Robert Hare
1850 May 3 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. His father is out of town.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1850 May 11 box 3

A.L.S. 3p., end. Friendly letter. His apparatus for the Smithsonian. His course on electricity.

John J. Kane to Robert Hare
1850 June 14 box 3

Sing Sing, A.L.S. 1p. and add., end. Questions a purported discovery by Paine on the use of electricity.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Daniel W. Coxe
1850 October 3 box 3

Philadelphia, L.S. 3p. and end. Draft. Comparing English miners with U.S. slaves.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to John Cook
1850 October box 3

Philadelphia, L. 1p. and end. Draft. Offers him use of his patent for the preservation of flesh used for tallow.

Gwynne, James Stuart.
J. Stuart Gwynne to Robert Hare
1850 Nov. 2 box 3

New York, A.L.S. 1p. end. Needs letters of introduction for a trip to Europe.

Hart to Robert Hare
1850 Nov. 4 box 3

New York, A.L.S. 1p. and add. Has discussed his note with other people interested in agriculture.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to the Mayor of New York
1850 Nov. 20 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 3p. and end. Concerning the prevention of putrefaction in meat.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1850 Nov. 25 box 3

L.S.: Joseph Henry. 1p., end. Notifies him he may attend the meetings of the Board of Regents whenever he desires.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Charles Cumming
1850 Nov. 28 box 3

Philadelphia, L.S. 1p., end. and end. Concerning his patented process.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1851 Feb. 24 box 3

A.L.S. 2p., end. Authorizes, in the name of the Smithsonian, his use of ozone apparatus before the Franklin Institute.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1851 Feb. 28 box 3

A.L.S. 3p., end. AAAS wishes to publish his remarks on government.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1851 April 28 box 3

A.L.S.: E. Foreman. 1p., end. Is shipping apparatus which was inadvertently ommitted in shipment.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1851 May 15 box 3

Washington, A.L.S. 1p., end. Will ship apparatus today.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1851 June 10 box 3

A.L.S. 3p., end. Concerning the shipment of apparatus to the Smithsonian. Friendly letter, praising him in his research.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1851 Oct. 21 box 3

A.L.S. 2p., end. Will discuss differences in their opinions on the transferrence of his apparatus to the Smithsonian.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1851 Dec. 11 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. Concerning the transferrence of his aparatus to the Smithsonian.

Channing, William F. (William Francis), 1820-1901 .
William F. Channing to Robert Hare
1851 Dec. 14 box 3

Boston, A.L.S. 12p. Comments on current events, especially the slave question. Tornado.

F. Vose to Robert Hare
1851 Dec. 26 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p., end. Wishes to rent from him.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1852 Jan. 12 box 3

A.L.S. 4p. Friendly letter. Is shipping apparatus immediately. Smithsonian news.

Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 1806-1873.
M. F. Maury to Robert Hare
1852 Jan. 17 box 3

Washington, L.S. 2p., end. Meteorological questions.

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Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1852 April 27 box 3

A.L.S. 4p. Authorizes that he hire a man for the Smithsonian to take care of his apparatus. Concerning his, Espy's and the Smithsonian's interest in tornadoes and work being done on tornadoes by Blodget.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1852 May 4 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. Concerning his apparatus and the fact that Silliman, who had just lectured, gave credit for the apparatus. Describes the building of the Smithsonian.

R. P. Stevens to Robert Hare
1852 July 2 box 3

A.L.S. 4p. Concerning his and Espy's theories of tornadoes. Describes several tornadoes he has seen.

Robert Hare to Joseph Henry
1852 Sept. 2 box 3

Darlington, Pennsylvania, L. 1p. Duplicate. Agreement between William De Benst and the Smithsonian for the repair of the apparatus he presented to the Smithsonian.

Robert Hare to Joseph Henry
1852 Sept. 12 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Draft. Concerning De Benst and his agreement to repair apparatus presented to the Smithsonian.

Robert Hare to Judge Rogers
1852 Oct. 4 box 3

A.L. 2p. and end. Draft. His ideas of the War of 1812.

Robert Hare. On money
1852? box 3

A.D. 1p.

Robert Hare to "my dear Frederick"
1853 Jan. 27 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p. Draft. Difficulty with having work done.

Morris, Margaretta Hare, 1797-1867.
Margaretta H. Morris to Mrs. Harriett Clark Hare
1853 Feb. 17 box 3

Germantown, A.L.S. 3p. Copies a prayer by, and the epitaph of, their mutual "ancestress", Mrs. Ann Willing.

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Dobbins, James Cochrane, 1814-1857.
J. C. Dobbins to F. P. Stanton
1853 Dec. 19 box 3

L.S. 1p. and end. States the amount, in answer to inquiry of Dr. Hare, expended on Espy's salary, etc.

Robert Hare to Mr. Tucker
1854 March 2 box 3

L. 4p., end. Draft. Replies to newspaper letter on copyrights.

S. B. Halliday to Robert Hare
1854 April 21 box 3

Providence, R.I., A.L.S. 1p. and end. Concerning the possibility of making guano from fish.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to S. B. Halliday
1854 May 26 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 2p. Draft. Concerning the making of guano from fish.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Mr. Moodie
1854 July 9 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L. 1p. Draft. Incomplete. Explaining the expenditure of funds for spiritualism.

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William De Benst to Robert Hare
1854 Aug. 1 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and add. Concerning tools to repair equipment at the Smithsonian. Refers to Henry.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1854 Oct. 9 box 3

Washington, L.S.: Joseph Henry. 1p. Notification of meeting.

Rogers, R. E. (Robert Empie), 1813-1884.
R. E. Rogers to Robert Hare
1854 Nov. 23 box 3

A.L.S. 1p. Encloses money which is interest due him.

R. H. Hare to John H. Enser
1854 Nov. 24 box 3

Philadelphia, A.D.S. 1p. and end. by R. Hare.

Wilson N. Cary. Protest of Robert Hare's bill of exchange
1854 Nov. 25 box 3

Printed D. filled in in ms. S. 2p.

Robert Hare to ----
1855 April 18 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L. 3p. Draft. Concerning a publication of his, and spiritualism.

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Partridge and Brittan. Agreement with Robert Hare
1855 May 21 box 3

D. 2p. and end. Copy. Agreement with Robert Hare for publication of his book on spiritualism.

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Robert Hare to Partridge and Brittan
1855 June 26 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 3p. and end. Copy. His book on spiritualism must be done here since "the spirits wish it to be done here under their auspices."

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J. D. Knight to Robert Hare
1855 July 20 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Concerning types of oil.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare. Bills and receipts for expenditures at Baltimore
1855 July-Nov. box 3

D. 8 items. Various sizes.

G. Huff to Robert Hare
1855 Sept. 19 box 3

Lexington, Kentucky, A.L.S. 1p. Asks for battery since he believes Hare "to be the best electrician in this country."

S. B. Halliday to Robert Hare
1855 Nov. 8 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. and end. Concerning the manufacture of fish guano.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1855 Dec. 3 box 3

New York, A.L.S. 2p. and end. Concerning publications of his by Partridge & Britton.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1855 Dec. 17 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Will hire De Benst. Friendly letter.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare. On the frequent use of the word, "well"
1856 January box 3

A.D.S.: Americanus. 1p. and end. Draft. Essay on the frequent use of the word "well".

Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 Feb. 18 box 3
Partridge and Brittan. Account with Robert Hare
1856 Feb.-Oct. box 3

D. 1p.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 March 21 box 2

A.L.S. 2p. end. Smithsonian affairs. (Previously cataloged as 1836.)

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 April 3 box 3

Washington, L.S. 3p. The Smithsonian will publish his article on tornadoes and lists costs and stipulates contents. Concerning his electrical apparatus and De Benst. Meteorological comments.

Robert Hare to Mr. Wilson
1856 April 4 

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p. Recommends him to Dr. William Channing of Boston for questions on electricity.

Other Descriptive Information: Formerly B H22.2. Not located 4/2010

George Gourlay. Promissory note to Robert Hare
1856 April 28 box 3

Philadelphia, D.S. 1p.

Meriam, Ebenezer,1794-1864..
E. Meriam to Robert Hare
1856 May 3 box 3

Brooklyn, A.L.S. 1p. Asks if he were the first to insulate wires for electrical experiments under water.

Allibone, S. Austin (Samuel Austin), 1816-1889.
S. Austin Allibone to Robert Hare
1856 May 5 box 3

A.L.S. 1p. Asks if he were the first to insulate wires for electrical experiments under water.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 May 9 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. Concerning De Benst and the Smithsonian. Friendly letter.

J. B. Smyth to Robert Hare
1856 May 12 box 3

Rockford, Ill; A.L.S. 1p. Asks for name of a cheap acid to aid in making of cornstarch.

Pratt and Freeman to Robert Hare
1856 May 20 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 1p. Notifies him of an "oil manufactured from...Coal".

Charles B. Boyle to Robert Hare
1856 June 30 box 3

Garison's Landing, N.Y., A.L.S. 3p. Concerning photography and news of new developments. Refers to his spiritualism.

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Edmond Hurst. Protest of a note by George Gourlay to Robert Hare
1856 July 31. box 3

Printed D. filled in in ms. S.: Edmond Hurst, Notary Public. 1p. and end.

J. L. Hill to Robert Hare
1856 Sept. 1 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Concerning chemical problems and his solutions: ammonia, light, oxygen.

J. B. Smyth to Robert Hare
1856 Sept. 30 box 3

Rockford, Ill.; A.L.S. 2p. Concerning the making of starch from corn.

J. B. Smyth to Robert Hare
1856 Oct. 16 box 3

Rockford, Ill.; A.L.S. 3p. Concerning the making of starch from corn.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to A. D. Bache
1856 Oct. 31 box 3

L. 4p. and end. Concerning standard weights and measures.

Sarah Gibbs to Robert Hare
1856? Nov.3 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. and add. Sends copy of receipt.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 Nov. 3 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Concerning his communication on weights and measures.

J. B. Smyth to Robert Hare
1856 Dec. 15 box 3

Rockford, Illinois; A.L.S. 3p. Concerning chemical action on corn by adding water, with ammonia as a result.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1856 Dec. 31 box 3

Washington, A.L.S. 3p. Concerning his communication on the manufacture of weights and measures. Concerning De Bendt and the Smithsonian.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1857 Jan. 1 box 3

Washington, L.S.: Joseph Henry, Sec. 1p. and end. Informs him of date of meeting of the Board of Regents.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 Jan. 17 box 3

New York, L.S. 4p. Concerning his publications by Partridge and Britton.

S. B. Britton to Robert Hare
1857 Jan. 30 box 3

New York, L.S. 1p. Partridge & Britton will try to publish his paper shortly. Suggests an article on spiritualism and science.

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Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to the President of the Agricultural Society of the U.S. Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture (?)
1857 Jan. box 3

A.D. 3p. and end. Draft. Concerning the manufacture of an artificial guano.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1857 Feb. 3 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Concerning Espy, Redfield, and his [Hare's] theories of tornadoes. Concerning Maury and his work on the seas.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 March 17 box 3

New York, A.L.S. 4p. Publications and attempts to settle accounts between Hare and Partridge & Britton.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 March 30 box 3

New York, A.L.S. 4p. Business differences over publications.

Bache, A. D. (Alexander Dallas), 1806-1867.
Alexander D. Bache to Joseph Henry
1857 April 3 box 3

Savannah, Georgia, L. 1p. Copy. Concerning Hare's instrument for weights and measures. Enclosed originally in letter from Smithsonian institution to Hare; April 7, 1857.

Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonian Institution to Robert Hare
1857 April 7 box 3

L.S.: Joseph Henry, Sec. 1p. Enc. Encloses letter of A.D.Bache pertaining to his instrument for weights and measures For enclosure, see: A.D.Bache to J. Henry; April 3, 1857.

B. P. Newman to Robert Hare
1857 May 7 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. Asks for help for engravers to make clearer lines in their work.

Concerning Christianity
1857 May 8 box 3

Other Descriptive Information: Not located 4/2010

H. F. Gardner to Robert Hare
1857 June 8 box 3

Boston, A.L.S. 2p. Concerning the forwarding of his publications in England. Is involved in an argument with Agassiz, etc. on spiritualism and medicine.

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Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
1857 June 8 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p. Draft. Spiritualism.

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Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Partridge and Brittan
1857 June 12 box 3

Philadelphia, L.S. 4p. Concerning books sent as gifts to friends in England.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1857 July 7 box 3

L.S. 1p. Concerning his article on tornadoes.

H. F. Gardner to Robert Hare
1857 July 23 box 3

Boston, A.L.S. 3p. Concerning the investigation of spiritualism by Agassiz, etc.

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S. W. Rodman to Robert Hare
1857 Sept. 10 box 3

Boston, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Encloses check for dividends.

Francis Peters to Robert Hare
1857 Sept. 28 box 3

A.L.S. 5p. Asks questions concerning water density.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 Sept. 28 box 3

New York, L. 1p. Concerning his publication in stock.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
1857 Oct. 15 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Credit system of the country and his pamphlet on it. Friendly letter.

William B. Aitkin to Robert Hare
1857 Oct. 19 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 1p. Concerning shipment of "spiritscope" to Texas.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 Nov. 28 box 3

A.L.S. 1p. Forwarding publication.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857 Dec. 31 box 3

New York, L. 2p. Concerning the publication of his writings.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1857? box 3

L.S. 9p. Incomplete. Concerning his publications. Concerning his work on spiritualism.

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Robert Hare to James Ruggles
1858 Feb. 17 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. and end. Draft. Wishes to supervise his son's studies of medicine.

James Ruggles to Robert Hare
1858 Feb. 18 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Needs financial aid to train his son in medicine.

Robert Hare to James Ruggles
1858 Feb. 19 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. and end. Draft. Concerning the medical education of his son.

J. L. Gatchet to Robert Hare
1858 Feb. 27 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 2p., end. Concerning lightning rods.

John F. Gray and E. H. Gray to Robert Hare
1858 March 10. box 3

A.L.S.: John F. Gray and P. S. by Mrs. E. H. Gray. 2p. Has made inquiries to Mr. Partridge as requested.

Charles Partridge to Robert Hare
1858 April 20 box 3

New York, L. 1p. Has forwarded copies of his new edition.

S. A. Peters. Statement concerning Dr. Hare's experiments with spiritualism
1858 April 20 box 3

Philadelphia, D.S. 2p., end.

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R. H. Hare to ---
1858 May 8 box 3

A.L.S. 3p. Medical treatment through spiritualism.

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Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to James Ruggles
1858 May 8 box 3

Philadelphia, L. 4p. Concerning his son's interest in the study of medicine.

M. Gieb to Robert Hare
1858 May 10 box 3

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 1p. and end. Does not visit him for fear of upsetting him. Hopes he gets well soon.

Pepper, William, 1810-1864.
William Pepper and Joseph Pancoast. Statement...
1858 May 11 box 3

A.L.S.: William Pepper and Joseph Pancoast. 1p. and end.

Dunglison, Robley, 1798-1869.
Robley Dunglison to Robert Hare
1858 May 14 box 3

A.L.S. 2p. Will join his doctor, Pancoast, to wait on him, if his gout permits.

University of Pennsylvania. Medical School--Faculty.
University of Pennsylvania Medical Faculty. Resolution upon the death of Robert Hare
1858 May 18 box 3

A.D.S.: R. E. Rogers. 2p.

Robley Dunglison to Harriet Clark Hare
1858 Oct. 1 box 3

Philadelphia, Oct. 1, 1858. A.L.S. 1p. and add. Forwards minute of Jefferson Medical College referring to the death of Robert Hare.

Fitzgerald to Dr. Hare
1858 box 3

A.L.S. 1p. Bill for publications and will give him one column a week.

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
Jan. 17 

Refers to publications and apparatus. Mentions Mr. Bishop.

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878.
Joseph Henry to Robert Hare
Jan. 19 box 4

A.L.S. 3p. He must bill the Smithsonian for cost of ozone apparatus.

Hare to Robert Hare?
Jan. 31 box 4

L. 4p. Incomplete. Is too ill to travel and cannot go to London.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Robert Walsh
Feb. 20 box 4

A.L.S. 4p., end. Regarding articles in the National Gazette concerning the University.

Robert Hare to ---
March 30 box 4

Philadelphia, A.L. 2p. Fragment. Wonders at his objection for a man "doing me this Kindness".

William H. Roper to Robert Hare
March 30 box 4

New York, A.L.S. 1p. and add. Mutilated. Legacy of Mrs. Hare.

Mr. and Mrs. Wildes to Robert Hare
May box 4

L. in 3rd. p. 1p. Invitation to dinner.

Robert Hare to Alfred Elwyn
June 9 box 4

Philadelphia, A.L.S. 4p., end. Draft. Concerning converting dead dogs into fertilizer.

Kirkbride, Thomas Story, 1809-1883.
Thomas S. Kirkbride to Robert Hare
July 9 box 4

A.L.S. 1p. and add. Thanks for lathe. Concerning need for chemical apparatus, etc.. See 1840 July 20

Robert Hare to Benjamin Silliman
July 26 

Refers to publications, including engravings.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Robert Hare to Joseph Curwen
Oct. 20 box 4

A.L. in 3rd. P. 1p. and end. Invites him to dinner.

[Hare] to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Sunday

Fanny Butler to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Monday. A.L.S. 1p. Hopes to entertain him.

[Hare] to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Monday

M. Wellesley to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Monday. A.L.S. 2p. Will see him at 4:00 tomorrow.

I. J. Chapman to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Tuesday. A.L.S. 1p. Forwards invitation for him to visit the Athenaeum club.

M. A. Wellesley to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Tuesday. A.L.S. 2p. Cannot see him tomorrow.

R. T. Willing to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Tuesday. A.L.S. 11p. Concerning their discussion on spiritualism.

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Hare to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Thursday. L. 12p. Hopes they can get together before winter. Friendly letter.

Hare to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Thursday. L. 8p. Family news. Friendly letter.

Amelia Lloyd to "Dear Delia"
undated box 4

Friday. A.L.S. 4p. Enoyed the "joyous occasion." Plans for the summer. Friendly letter.

Mary W. McTavish to Robert Hare
undated box 4

Saturday. A.L.S. 2p. Her aunt is ill, that is why she writes for her.

A.J. Brady to Robert Hare
undated box 4

A.L.S. 1p. Concerning the publication of his article on spiritualism.

John Cusolle to Robert Hare
undated box 4

New York. A.L.S. 1p. and end. Asks chemical formula for cognac oil. Spiritualism.

Elisha De Butts and Robert Hare. Agreement...
undated box 4
Extracts from magazines...
undated box 4
A. Hare to Harriet Clark Hare
undated box 4

A.L.S. 1p. and add. Will dine with her on Thursday.

M. Hare to Robert Hare
undated box 4

A.L.S. 2p. Concerning the Hare genealogy.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Article to the editors of the Franklin Journal
undated box 4

L. 4p. Concerning specific heat of elastic fluids. Refers to the APS.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Bills...
undated box 4

D. 7 items. Various sizes.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Chemist's apology
undated box 4

D. 4p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning electricity
undated box 4

D. 1p. and end. "This theory has had the sanction of my spirit friends, the famous Franklin..."

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning gold, credit, etc.
undated box 4

D. 10p.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning his difference in views with Peltier...
undated box 4

D. 9p. and end. Concerning his difference in views with Peltier respecting tornadoes.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning his gift of apparatus to the Smithsonian
undated box 4

D. 1p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning paper money
undated box 4

D. 1p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning religion
undated box 4

D. 2p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the gas ram
undated box 4

D. 6p. and end. Various sizes.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the Irish and the British
undated box 4

D. 1p. and end. Draft.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the mails and the railroads
undated box 4

A.D.S. 1p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the manufacture of fish guano
undated box 4

A.D. 2p. (Read to the APS?)

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the meaning of "Yankee annexation"
undated box 4

A.D. 4p.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning the slaughtering houses
undated box 4

A.D. 1p. and end. States how offensive odors may be kept down.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Concerning tornadoes
undated box 4
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Cost of apparatus incurred in making experiments...
undated box 4

A.D. 1p. Draft. "...agreeably to an understanding with Professor Henry".

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Despretendus Principes de Liebig
undated box 4

A.D. 4p. Partly in French, and partly in another hand.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Endorsement sheets
undated box 4

D. 17 items. Various sizes. Miscellany.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Errors of our Whig politicians
undated box 4

D. 8p. and end.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Gift of apparatus to the Smithsonian Institution
undated box 4

A.D. 2p. and end. Draft.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Instructions for pressing gun-cotton
undated box 4

A.D. 3p. and end. Draft.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Lord Ashburton
undated box 4

A.L. 1p. Incomplete. Sorry to have missed seeing him.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Count Cancrin
undated box 4

A.L. 2p. and add. Draft. Concerning his experiments on iridium and platinum. Count Cancrine [George, i.e., Igor Frankovitch Cancrin].

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Count Cancrin
undated box 4

L. 3p. and end. In French. Concerning his experiments on iridium and platinum. ---Copy. 3p. and end. 10x8. "Le Comte Cancrine" [George, i.e., Igor Frankovitch Cancrin]. In French.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Count Cancrin
undated box 4

A.L. 3p. and end. Draft. In French. Concerning iridium and mining. "Le Comte Cancrine" [George, i.e., Igor Frankovitch Cancrin].

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Carey and Lea
undated box 4

A.L. 2p. Draft. States that they have plates for one of his publications, and he wants them.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the editors of the Chemist
undated box 4

A.L. 2p. and end. Draft. Concerning his chemical nomenclature. Refers to the APS.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the editors...
undated box 4

L. 1p. and end. Praises Federalism and Federalists.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the editor of the Enquirer and National Gazette
undated box 4

A.L.S. 3p. and end. Draft. Lightning rods and their use.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the editors of the North American and the U.S. Gazette
undated box 4

A.L.S. 2p. Draft. Did not attack the goverment in his speech before the AAAS.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Joseph Henry
undated box 4

A.L. 1p. Incomplete. Draft. Concerning De Bendt and his apparatus.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Oliver Kane
undated box 4
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the National Intelligencer
undated box 4

L. 2p.and end. Concerning imponderable matter.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Charles Partridge
undated box 4

A.L. 4p. Draft. Concerning publications and expenses.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to Partridge and Brittan
undated box 4

A.L. 4p. Draft. Concerning expenses of publication.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the University of Pennsylvania Committee of the Trustees...
undated box 4

A.L. 2p. and end. Draft. To the Trustees appointed to confer with the Medical Faculty. Concerning instruction and teaching in the medical school.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to William Wagner
undated box 5

A.L.S. 1p. and end. Copy. Will lend apparatus to the Wagner Institute. Will give electrical apparatus.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to the Revd. Dr. Wilson
  box 5

A.L.S. 3p. Draft. Incomplete. Disputes uses of words. Concerning light.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to ----
undated box 5

A.L. 2p. Draft. Incomplete. Concerning storms and electrical discharges.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Letter to ----
undated box 5

A.L.S. 2p. Draft. Concerning cycloidal curves and tornadoes.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
A List of Fixed Stars...
undated box 5

D. 1p. Concerning light distance.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
List of glass and porcelain apparatus
undated box 5

D. 8p.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Memorandum on Voltaire at Ferney
  box 5

A.D. 1p.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Miscellaneous notes on political matters
undated box 5

D. 10. Various sizes. Attacks Whigs and Locofocos.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Miscellaneous notes on slavery
undated box 5

A.D. 7p. Various sizes. Anti-slavery sentiments.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Miscellaneous notes on storms
undated box 5

A.D. 8p. Various sizes.

Hare, Robert, 1781-1858.
Notes on chemistry
undated box 5

A.D. 3p.

Hare, Robert,