Nathanael Greene Papers

Mss.B.G83

Date: 1777-1780 | Size: 4 Linear feet

Abstract

Nathanael Greene was one of the leading commanders in the Continental Army, and the only officer George Washington saw as capable of leading in his absence. Greene served as a field commander, member of Washington's staff, Quartermaster General, and commander of the Army in the Southern Theater. Greene was born on July 27, 1742 in Potowomut, Rhode Island to a Quaker family, who believed that their children would learn more from manual labor then from attending school. Lacking a formal education Greene was very intelligent and taught himself to read, developing early on a love of books - particularly military history and theory. It was through reading, not experience, where Greene learned his knowledge of military science. Between 1778 and 1780 he reluctantly served as Quartermaster General, and was able to drastically improve supplying the Continental Army. Greene ended his military career leading the American Southern army to victory over the British. Greene died in Georgia in June 1786.

The Papers of Nathanael Greene come from Greene's tenure as Quartermaster General of the Continental Army between 1778 and 1780. The collection primarily consists of Greene's correspondence with officers in the quartermaster department, officers in the Army (including George Washington), and members of the Continental Congress; relating to the operation of the Quartermaster Department with requests for supplies, forage, and money. In addition, there is also correspondence between officers of the Quartermaster Department. The content of the letters provide a detailed account of the logistical obstacles that Greene and his subordinates faced in trying to keep not only the Quartermaster Department but the Continental Army running. The papers do not contain any material relating to Greene's military service or private life either before or after his tenure as quartermaster general.

Background note

Nathanael Greene rose from the rank of private to major-general in a short time to become one of the leading commanders in the Continental Army, and the only officer George Washington saw as capable of leading in his absence. Greene served as a field commander, member of Washington's staff, Quartermaster General, and commander of the Army in the Southern Theater. However, this military hero of the Revolution did not come from a military background, but was raised in the pacifist beliefs of a Quaker family.

Greene was born on July 27, 1742 in Potowomut, Rhode Island to Nathanael and Mary Mott, who believed that their children would learn more from manual labor than school. At an early age, Greene went to work in his father's iron forge. Though lacking a formal education, Greene was innately intelligent and taught himself to read, developing a love of books - particularly military history and theory.

Greene's first venture into public affairs came during the colonial crisis of the 1760s and and 1770s. After serving in the Rhode Island General Assembly from 1770 to 1772, he was among the organizers of the Kentish Guard in 1774, a militia unit formed for the protection of Rhode Island in anticipation of war. When he was rejected as an officer because of a limp he received from a childhood accident, he enlisted as a private. Greene also served on a committee authorized by the General Assembly to prepare Rhode Island's defenses, and in his spare time continued to study military science.

Greene's military knowledge, likeable personality, and political influence caught the attention of the Rhode Island assembly, and in 1775 he was appointed over veteran officers of the Seven Years' War as general of the Rhode Island Army of Observation. In the following weeks he organized three regiments and led them to Boston where he reported to George Washington. It was here that Washington first became impressed with Greene, and saw his potential for greater responsibilities in the Continental Army.

Greene's first year in military service however was less then distinguished. Following stalemates with the British at Boston and New York, he was placed in charge of preparing the defenses of Long Island, N.Y. In August 1776 he was promoted to major general, but fell ill and could not take the field when William Howe attacked in September. In November Greene was given command of Forts Washington and Lee across from New York City. When British troops threatened the works Greene decided not to evacuate, which resulted in the capture of both forts and 2,800 Continental troops. Despite these setbacks, Greene redeemed himself in December by providing invaluable assistance to Washington during the American retreat through New Jersey and the attack on Trenton.

Throughout 1777 Greene became increasingly indispensable to Washington as both a field officer and a member of his staff. During the early summer he thwarted Howe's attacks in New Jersey. When Howe opened the Philadelphia Campaign by landing his army in Maryland, Greene played important roles at the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown, and while the army was encamped at Valley Forge he assumed a key role in supplying the troops. Thomas Mifflin had resigned as quartermaster general of the army in October 1777 over criticism from Congress and poor health. Hard pressed to find a replacement, Washington turned to Greene to handle matters of supply. Out of respect for Washington's wishes Greene reluctantly accepted the position of quartermaster general in March 1778 on the condition that he maintain his rank as a field commander and be able to appoint John Cox and Charles Pettit as his assistant quartermasters-general. Although Greene believed the position was beneath him, he managed to improve the movement of supplies to the troops. During his two years in command of the department, Greene set up forage depots at key locations, took on the problem of transportation, and wrestled with Congress to get money to purchase the supplies the army needed. While Greene and his assistants struggled to supply the army in the face of inflation, they were accused of profiteering by Congress. Shortly thereafter, Greene learned that Congress had elected to hold the quartermaster general personally and financially responsible for the actions of his subordinates. After two years of continuous, aggravating, and thankless work this was the final act for Greene. On July 26, 1780 he resigned as quartermaster general.

Returning to his field command on June 28, 1778, Greene took command from Charles Lee who had ordered a retreat against Washington's wishes during the the Battle of Monmouth. Greene assisted John Sullivan in planning his Rhode Island Campaign in 1778, and on June 23, 1780 he was in command at Springfield, NJ when British troops under Baron Wilhelm von Knyphausen advanced from New York City. Greene's chance for independent command came in October 1780. Congress had relieved Horatio Gates as general of the southern army after allowing the British under Lord Cornwallis to take control of South Carolina and Georgia. In an effort to prevent the loss of North Carolina and Virginia, Congress authorized Washington to select Gates' replacement. Without hesitation Washington selected Greene, who immediately set out for the south. During the journey he added Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee's legion to his command and placed Baron Friedrich von Steuben in charge of organizing men and supplies. Greene arrived at Charlotte, N.C. on December 3 to relieve Gates of his command. Knowing that Cornwallis was waiting for reinforcements at Winnsboro, S.C., Greene decided to attack before they could arrive. With the assistance of Daniel Morgan, he launched a campaign in early 1781 that included the Battle of Cowpens on January 17 and the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on March 15, both American victories, that forced Cornwallis to withdraw to Virginia, while Greene took what remained of his command south after militia departures.

For the remainder of the war Greene worked with partisan forces against 8,000 British troops garrisoned throughout South Carolina and Georgia. Despite facing a larger force, he was able to force the British to withdraw from their interior posts to the coastal cities. Even after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown Greene continued to contend with British forces who held Charleston and Savannah until 1782, and to restore peace between patriots and Loyalists who continued to battle one another. It was not until after the peace treaty was signed that Greene was able to end his military career.

In 1783 Greene returned north a hero. In appreciation of his military service in the south, Greene received large estates from South Carolina and Georgia. After spending two years in the north Greene and his wife decided to settle in Georgia on their plantation Mulberry Grove.

The last years of Green's life were troubled by resurfacing accusations of profiteering during the war, and by a large debt which resulted when a note he had cosigned came due. Even though the charges of profiteering were disproved, but the debt remained. Greene died at Mulberry Grove on June 19, 1786 from an infection, leaving his family in financial uncertainty until Congress liquidated his debts ten years later.

Scope and content

The Papers of Nathanael Greene are 4 linear feet in size and come from Greene's tenure as Quartermaster General of the Continental Army between 1778 and 1780. The collection consists primarily of Greene's correspondence with officers in the quartermaster department, officers in the Army (including George Washington), and members of the Continental Congress; relating to the operation of the Quartermaster Department with requests for supplies, forage, and money. In addition, there is also correspondence between officers in the Quartermaster Department. The papers do not contain any material relating to Greene's military service or private life either before or after his tenure as quartermaster general.

This collection is an ideal source for the study the logistics during the Revolutionary War, and how it effected the Continental Army both during campaigns and on a daily basis. The letters provide a detailed account of the logistical obstacles that Greene and his subordinates faced in trying to keep both the Quartermaster Department and the Continental Army running. The collection contains quartermaster returns from various departments and commands, which provide accounts of supplies on hand and supplies needed. Of particular note is the insight into the financing of the war through the consistent calls for cash from all departments, and the commentary on Continental currency in regards to the demands for payment for services and goods provided to the Army. As James T. Mitchell, chairman of the APS's Committee on Historical Manuscripts, noted, "in no place ... can a more graphic and vivid conception be gathered of the hardships and struggles of the Revolutionary army."

On occasion the correspondence does touch on more exciting topics from the period. Of note are George Weedon's November 9, 1778 letter to Greene in which he discusses the birth of Greene's daughter, comments on the Rhode Island Expedition, asks for Greene's opinion on certain matters, and states his views that the British are about ready to quit. There is also Daniel Brodhead's May 26, 1779 correspondence which discusses Gen. McIntosh, Gen. Sullivan, and the Indian Expedition. Finally, there is Robert Forsyth's May 19, 1779 letter that describes the situation in Virginia. In addition to the correspondence, the Greene papers also contain the court of inquiry records into the conduct of Captain John Bancker who was Barrackmaster for part of New York, Quartermaster Department returns, and miscellaneous papers.

The papers were originally arranged by Colonel Charles Pettit into 12 volumes. Pettit had served as Colonial Secretary of New Jersey under Governor William Franklin and later as Secretary of State for Governor William Livingston. He resigned as secretary in 1778 to accept the position as Assistant Quartermaster General, and held that position until the end of the war having refused the appointment of Quartermaster General after Greene's resignation. Pettit continued in public service after the war until 1792. The papers remained in the family possession until 1820 when they were donated to the American Philosophical Society through Robert Desilver. Pettit also arranged a second set of Revolutionary War documents in his possession that were first in the possession of the Bureau of Rolls and Library in the Department of State, and are now at the National Archives and Records Administration. The papers were initially calendared by the APS in 1900 by Emma Repplier under the supervision of the Committee on Historical Manuscripts. Pettit's original arrangement of the papers by volume and page number was retained at that time.

To make the papers more accessible to researchers they have been reorganized into four series, and arranged therein first alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically. The original volume and page numbers have been included in the descriptions to assist anyone using an older citation.

Series I. Correspondence 1778-1780 3 linear feet
Series II. Records of a Court of Inquiry 1778-1779 0.25 linear feet
Series III. Quartermaster Department Returns 1778-1780 0.5 linear feet
Series IV. Miscellaneous Papers 1777-1780 0.25 linear feet

Digital objects note

This collection contains digital materials that are available in the APS Digital Library. Links to these materials are provided with context in the inventory of this finding aid. A general listing of digital objects may also be found here.

Collection Information

Provenance

Presented by Robert Desilver, from family of Colonel Charles Pettit (who arranged the papers in 1792), 1820.

Preferred citation

Cite as: Nathanael Greene Papers, American Philosophical Society.

Processing information

Recatalogued by J.J. Ahern, 2003.

Other finding aids

Calendar of the Correspondence Relating to the American Revolution of Brigadier-General George Weedon, Hon. Richard Henry Lee, Hon. Arthur Lee, and Major-General Nathanael Greene, in the Library of the American Philosophical Society (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1900) Call no. 973.3 Am4.

Related material

The Greene Papers are one of several important collections at the APS for documenting the American Revolution, including the papers of Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, and George Weedon.

There are additional collections of Greene material at other repositories. The major collections are:

Nathanael Greene Papers, 1762-1822. William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan (30 ln. ft).

Orderly book of Nathanael Greene, 1781 April 1 - July 25. Huntington Library.

Collection of correspondence of Nathanael Greene, 1775-1786. Huntington Library (2700 items)

Papers of Nathanael Greene, 1775-1785. Library of Congress. (400 items)

Major General Nathanael Greene Collection, 1770 - 1786. Rhode Island Historical Society. (1 ln. ft.)

Nathanael Greene Papers, 1778-1786. Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (199 items)

Bibliography

Greene, George Washington. Life of Nathanael Greene, Major-genral in the army of the American Revolution. Call. No. 920 Sp2L ser.2, v. 10

Johnson, William. Sketches of the life and correspondence of Nathanael Greene, Major General of the Armies of the United States, in the war of the Revolution. Charleston, S.C.: A.E. Miller, 1822. Call. no. B G83j

Showman, Richard K. et. al., ed. The Papers of Nathanael Greene. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1976-2002

Thayer, Theodore. Nathanael Greene: Strategist of the American Revolution. New York: Twayne, Publishers, 1960. Call.no. B G83t

Wells, Thomas L. "An inquiry into the resignation of quarter-master general Nathanael Greene in 1780." Rhode Island History. Call. no. 9740.5 R34h v.24, no.2.

Early American History Note

The Nathanael Greene Collection is a large collection of correspondence primarily related to supplying the Continental Army. The bulk of the correspondence dates from 1778-1780, during which time Greene served as Quartermaster General of the Continental Army. The correspondence captures the supply issues that the Army faced during the war, and the means of financing and supplying it. Because the bulk of the collection is correspondence and not account or ledger books, the letters to Greene from the field often provide interesting details and anecdotes on requisitioning.

Because Greene was tasked with supplying the entirety of the Continental troops, the correspondence includes reports on military operations throughout the United States. There are some reports on various military court proceedings, often involving those tasked with supply. Of particular note is an extensive collection on John Bancker's court of inquiry, who had served as barrack master for the supply depot at Fishkill before he was replaced because of incompetence.

Indexing Terms


Corporate Name(s)

  • Massachusetts. Council
  • United States. Board of Navy Commissioners
  • United States. Continental Army
  • United States. Continental Congress
  • United States. Continental Congress. Board of War and Ordnance

Genre(s)

  • Business Records and Accounts
  • Military Records
  • Official Government Documents and Records
  • Political Correspondence

Geographic Name(s)

  • United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783
  • United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Supplies and stores

Personal Name(s)

  • Abeel, James, 1733-1825
  • Barnes, John, 1730-1826
  • Bayley, Jacob, 1726-1815
  • Beatty, Charles
  • Beatty, John
  • Belding, Simeon
  • Berry, Sidney
  • Betts, William M.
  • Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814
  • Biddle, Owen
  • Binney, Barnabas
  • Bland, Theodorick, 1742-1790
  • Blodget, William
  • Bowen, Ephraim
  • Brodhead, Daniel, 1736-1818
  • Brown, William, 1748-1792
  • Buchanan, John, 1743-1822
  • Burnet, Ichabod
  • Byas, Standley
  • Caldwell, James, 1734-1781
  • Capp, John
  • Chase, Thomas
  • Claiborne, Richard
  • Claiborne, Robert
  • Clinton, Charles, 1734-1791
  • Clinton, George, 1739-1812
  • Collins, Stephen, ca. 1758-179
  • Cordon, Peter
  • Cox, John, 1731-1793
  • Croghan, William, 1752-1823
  • Davis, John, 1755-1783
  • Dickinson, John, 1732-1808
  • Edmunston, Samuel
  • Erskine, John
  • Erskine, Robert, 1735-1780
  • Eyre, Benjamin
  • Ferris, Owen
  • Finnie, William
  • Flint, Royal
  • Ford, James
  • Forsyth, Robert
  • Furman, Moore
  • Gamble , Robert, 1754-1810
  • Gerard, Chevalier
  • Gibson, George, 1747-1791
  • Gooch, John
  • Gordon, Peter
  • Gorham, Nathaniel, 1738-1796
  • Gray,George
  • Greene, Christopher
  • Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786
  • Greene, William, 1731-1809
  • Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804
  • Hand, Edward, 1744-1802
  • Harrison, John, 1693-1776
  • Harrison, Robert Hanson, 1745-1790
  • Harvey, John, 1745-1812
  • Hay, Udny
  • Hazen, Moses, 1733-1803
  • Hollingsworth, Henry, 1731-180
  • Hooper, Robert Lettis, 1730?-1
  • Houston, William Churchill
  • Howe, Baxter
  • Howe, Robert
  • Howell, Joseph
  • Hubbard, Nehemiah
  • Huntington, Samuel, 1731-1796
  • Irvine, William, 1741-1804
  • Jackson, David, 1747-1801
  • Jamison, Adame
  • Jay, John, 1745-1829
  • Johnson, Thomas, 1732-1819
  • Kingsland, Eliza
  • Kirkpatrick, Abraham, 1749-1817
  • Knox, Henry, 1750-1806
  • Kościuszko, Tadeusz, 1746-1817
  • Larzelere, Abraham
  • Lawrence, John, ca. 1739-1801
  • Lewis, Joseph S., 1778-1836
  • Lewis, Morgan, 1754-1844
  • Livingston, Abraham
  • Livingston, William, 1723-1790
  • Lott, Abraham
  • Ludwick, Christopher, 1720-1801
  • Manley, John, 1733-1793
  • Matlack, Timothy, 1736-1829
  • Maxwell, William
  • McCashlan, James
  • McDougal, Alexander, 1732-1786
  • McHenry, James, 1753-1816
  • Meade, Richard Kidder, 1746-1805
  • Melcher, Isaac
  • Meng Christopher
  • Mitchell, John
  • Morgan, George, 1743-1810
  • Morgan, Jacob
  • Morgan, John, 1735-1789
  • Morris, Gouverneur, 1752-1816
  • Morris, Lewis, 1726-1798
  • Moylan, Stephen, 1737-1811
  • Muhlenberg, Paul
  • Muhlenberg, Peter
  • Mylan, Stephen
  • Olney, George
  • Otis and Henley, Messrs.
  • Otis, Samuel Allyne, 1740-1814
  • Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809
  • Painter, Gamaliel, 1742-1819
  • Palfrey, William
  • Parsons, Samuel Holden, 1737-1789
  • Paterson, John
  • Patten, John
  • Patterson, Alexander
  • Patterson, William, 1752-1835
  • Patton, Robert
  • Peters, Richard, 1743-1828
  • Pettit, Charles, 1736-1806
  • Pickering, Timothy, 1745-1829
  • Porterfield, Robert, 1752-1843
  • Price, Thomas
  • Putnam, Isaac
  • Reed, Joseph, 1741-1785
  • Rice, Holman
  • Richardson, James
  • Rodney, C. A. (Caesar Augustus), 1772-1824
  • Ross, George
  • Russell, William, 1740-1818
  • Sargent, Winthrop, 1753-1820
  • Scammell, Alexander
  • Schuyler, Peter
  • Scull, Peter
  • Shallus, Jacob
  • Shaw, Thomas, 1753-1838
  • Shepard, William, 1737-1817
  • Sheriff, Charles
  • Sheriff, Cornelius
  • Shreve, Israel
  • Sickels, Thomas
  • Smallwood, William, 1732-1792
  • Smith, William
  • St. Clair, Arthur, 1734-1818
  • Starr, John
  • Steel, Archibald
  • Stephens, William
  • Steuben, Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin, Baron von, 1730-1794
  • Stewart, Charles
  • Stewart, Walter
  • Stirling, Lord, 1726-1783
  • Stockton, Robert
  • Stoddert, Benjamin, 1751-1813
  • Story, John
  • Sullivan, John, 1740-1795
  • Tallmadge, Benjamin, 1754-1835
  • Thompson, James
  • Tilghman, Tench, 1744-1786
  • Tilton, James, 1745-1822
  • Turner, Peter, 1751-1822
  • Varnum, James M. (James Mitchell), 1748-1789
  • Veazey, John Ward, ca. 1722 -
  • Villefranche, Jean Louis Ambroise de Genton, Chevalier de
  • Wade, Francis
  • Wadsworth, Jeremiah, 1743-1804
  • Washington, George (1732-1799)
  • Wayne, Anthony, 1745-1796
  • Weedon, George, 1730?-1790
  • Weiss, Jacob, 1750-1839
  • Wendell, Oliver, 1733-1818
  • Whiting, Timothy
  • Wilkinson, James, 1757-1825
  • Williams, Otho Holland, 1749-1
  • Woodford, William, 1734-1780
  • Young, Henry
  • Ziegler, David, 1748-1811

Subject(s)

  • American Revolution
  • Government Affairs
  • Military History
  • Quartermasters -- United States

Collection overview

1777-17803 lin. feet

Contains correspondence to and from Nathanael Greene during his tenure as Quartermaster General. There is also correspondence between other officers in the Quartermaster Department.

1778-17790.25 lin. feet

Records from the Court of Inquiry into the conduct of Captain John Bancker who was Barrackmaster for part of New York.

1778-17800.5 lin. feet

Returns from the various districts and regiments related to material under the control of the Quartermaster Department.

1777-17800.25 lin. feet

Contains various lists, records, invoices, returns, and other documents that are not related to the other series.



Detailed Inventory

Series I: Correspondence
1777-17803 lin. feet

Contains correspondence to and from Nathanael Greene during his tenure as Quartermaster General. There is also correspondence between other officers in the Quartermaster Department.

Unidentified.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 172pp.box 1

Raritan - Not possibe to carry on a Canada expedition with any prospect of success. Countermands certain orders and renews others.  iv, 37

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 April 162pp.box 1

Beverwick - Business at Pompton. Public indebted to Mr. Faesh at least £10,000 for iron and other articles. Will try and pay his share, which is trifling.  x, 13

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 81pp.box 1

Morristown - Horses taken by him for necessary duty. Hopes he has not done wrong.  x, 46

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 92ppbox 1

A draft of the following letter.  x, 49

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 92pp.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 5th inst. Concerning the number and price of various articles ordered by General Greene.  x, 42

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 112pp.box 1

Morristown - Destination of various stores. Suffering for want of forage; unless other methods are devised to procure it, the supplies must cease. Lazy conduct of wagoners who loiter on the road, with no one to call them to account.  x, 44

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Richard Claiborne
1779 January 141p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging his favor with Col. Livingston's enclosure. Desires Mr. Weiss to forward all the old axes as soon as possible.  ix, 1

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 181p.box 1

Morristown - Asking him to give a fresh horse to bearer, who is going express to His Excellency with a letter of great importance.  viii, 2

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to unknown correspondent
1779 January 181p.box 1

Morristown - Sending him six sleds of different sorts and asking his opinion of them. Entire sixty will be completed in a day or two.  viii, 1

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 231p.box 1

Morristown - Will send a number of sleds, more on Monday; also Lord Stirling's carry-all and one of the same kind for Gen. Greene, if he wishes it. Will forward the glass and an invoice of goods sent.  iii, 2

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 February 31p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 1st inst. Enclosing letter for Miss Livingston. Promising to send certain articles.  ix, 2

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 February 71p.box 1

Acknowledging favor of 6th inst. Promising to send him his pair of boots and the candlesticks in a few days. Sends by bearer twelve private locks, as Gen. Greene will no doubt take a fancy to them. Hopes the General is in camp, as he needs money and can do no business without it.  iv, 1

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 132pp.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 11th and 12th inst. Concerning tents, wagon harness, axes, etc. Number of wagons sent him. Question of forage. Want of cash. Price of iron. Sent him two saddles of venison.  viii, 3

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 142pp.box 1

Morristown - Sends the bearer, Mr. Maerschalk, to procure some cash if possible. Number of tools and great quantity of horseshoes contracted for, take a large amount of money. Cost of Iron. Will furnish a general return of stores the following week.  iv, 2

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 201p.box 1

Informing him how he may procure some cider.  iv, 3

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
Udny Hay's memorandum to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 211p.box 1

Asking Gen. Greene to write to Gen. Knox about repairing tents, and to Capt. Bruen to send him the ship carpenters. Poor quality of axes made in Pennsylvania. In need of cash to pay for iron, horseshoes, etc.  xi, 84

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 241p.box 1

Morristown - Want of leather for the harness makes; asks him to apply to His Excellency for an order. viii, 4

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 281p.box 1

Morristown - Asks for a portion of the supply of cash sent Gen. Greene by Mr. Pettit. Numerous calls on him. Will do all in his power to procure a good, honest girl for Mrs. Greene.  ix, 3

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to William Maxwell
1779 May 61p.box 1

Morristown - Question of tents. Forbidden to issue horsemen's tents without particular orders from Gen. Greene. Has an elegant marquee ready for Gen. Maxwell.  vii, 31

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 142pp.box 1

Morristown - Sends return by bearer, Mr. Maerschalk. Orders received for tents. Applied to Mr. Lewis, quartermaster of Morristown, for horses, and in his absence to his substitute, but was always disappointed.  vii, 95

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to George Olney
1779 May 141p.box 1

Morristown - Sending the long-wished-for returns by the bearer, Mr. Maerschalk. Has completed Gen. Maxwell's order.  vii, 94

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 192pp.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 17th inst. Tent-makers will be idle for want of twine. Reasons for his writing Mr. Weiss rather a warm letter; no dislike to him, however, and would do him any service in his power. Account of tents issued and those on hand.  v, 30

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 222pp.box 1

Morristown - Has discovered the reason of the deficiencies in the stores, sent off to Mr. Weiss from Morristown. Many of the articles found in the possession of the inhabitants of that town, all of whom will be in gaol before night. Wants to know if the men in the wagonmaster's department shall be sent to camp or tried by the civil law. Great want of twine for the tent-makers.  v, 55

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 231p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 22nd inst. Will set the saddlers to work at the portmanteaus. Has found sufficient proof against a number of inhabitants who were, and are still, in the service; articles belonging to the Commissary-General found in their houses. The guilty shall be punished. Mrs. Abeel will be happy to see Gen. and Mrs. Greene at Morristown.  v, 68

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 261p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of the 25th inst. Tents and canteens to be forwarded at once. Never mentions a syllable in any of the letters received from Gen. Greene. Has found nine persons guilty of felony, and seventy of plundering the stores in the public wagons.  v, 74

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 261p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of the 23rd inst. Concerning the making of tents. Will be out of twine unless Mr. Mitchell answers his repeated demands for some. His men working night and day. Desires an order to enable him to procure leather.  v, 75

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 281p.box 1

Acknowledging favor of 27th inst. Report of the work on portmanteaus and tents.  v, 90

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 61p.box 1

Ringwood - Acknowledging letters of the 3d, 4th and 6th. Glad to hear such encouraging talk respecting provisions. Asking for canteens and a good penknife or two. Just entering the Clove; nothing to eat there for man or beast.  vi, 30

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Benjamin Brown
1779 June 71p.box 1

Morristown - Has received and followed Gen. Greene's directions. Number of wagons sent forward. No forage to be had except hay.  vii, 46

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 92pp.box 1

Camp, Smith's Clove - Favorable information, concerning provisions, in his favor of the 6th inst., very pleasant hearing. Wishes four sent as fast as it comes to Morristown. Will soon release him (Col. Abeel) from transporting stores and enable him to attend to the objects within his own particular line of duty.  vi, 32

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 111p.box 1

Camp, Smith's Clove - Acknowledging favors of 8th and 9th inst. Impossible to furnish wagons to transport the stores from Pompton to camp till general arrangement is made. Thanks him for his politeness and attention to Mrs. Greene.  vi, 44

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 123pp.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Mr. Lewis' suitability for the business he is employed in. Begs him to lay aside any disputes he may have with Mr. Lewis. "Private pique should ever give way to public good." Thanks him for his zeal during Mr. Lewis' illness. vi, 52

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 141p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favors of 11th and 12th inst. Desires tents and portmanteaus forwarded at once. Will investigate the matter of camp kettles.  vi, 68

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 212pp.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 16th inst. Has sent large parcel of nails to Col. Hay. The court thought it had sufficient proof against Mr. Lewis to call a court-martial. It is certain that he has made an estate of about £20,000 in the course of two years. Mentions various proof of the man's roguery. Denies having lost his temper in court; has been quiet under many insults. Mr. Lott and Mr. Livingston in town; their wives the guests of Mrs. Abeel.  iii, 32

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 282pp.box 1

Morristown - Mr. Weiss' order for a number of articles shall be attended to. Gen. Sullivan's demand for 150 tents; cannot procure duck. Court of inquiry finished. Mr. Lewis failed to produce any evidence against him (Abeel). If a court-martial is called, can bring enough proof to hang Lewis. Implores Gen. Greene to let some steps be taken to bring the villain to justice and clear his (Abeel's) name.  iii, 31

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 71p.box 1

Morristown - Concerning a quantity of refined iron which he thinks it would be an advantage to the Department to buy.  ix, 4

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 71p.box 1

Morristown - Acknowledging favor if 4th inst. In accordance with Gen. Greene's letter, he and Lord Stirling set off to view the ground. Will try and have all the tools ready when called for.  ix, 5

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 101p.box 1

Morristown - Enclosing a rough sketch of a beautiful place for an encampment, abounding in woods, water and every other necessary. Preparing everything as fast as possible. Will have fowls, turkeys and potatoes, etc., provided in time for the General.  iii, 1

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 171p.box 1

Morristown - Has provided quarters for Mrs. Greene and Mrs. Olney near his house, and will do everything to make their situation agreeable.  ix, 6

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 221p.box 1

Position of Col. Willet's regiment.  ix, 9

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 231p.box 1

Morristown - Will put lock on doors to secure Mrs. Greene's clothes. Position of troops. By 10 o'clock will report on the ground near Mr. Lott's.  ix, 7

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 232pp.box 1

Morristown - Quarter of troops. Description of ground back of Mr. Kemble's.  ix, 8

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 241p.box 1

Report of woods near Mr. Lott's.  ix, 10

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
Report of ground between Parsippany Meeting House and Boon Town
n.d.1p.box 1

Report and drawing of the ground between Parsippany Meeting House and Boon Town (Boonton, N.J.).  ix, 11

Adams, Samuel .
to Commissioners of the Navy Board
1779 February 11p.box 1

Philadelphia - Asking that, if the sail-duck can be spared without prejudice to the navy, they will furnish Gen. Greene with 400 pieces. iv, 81

Barnes, John.
to George Gray
1779 April 11p.box 1

Order to mend the bearer's gun.  xii, 105

Barrett, Samuel and Co..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 122pp.box 1

Boston - Condoles with him on the loss of so capable, so honest and so assiduous a person as Mr. Andrews. Applies for the agency himself. His well-known fitness for it. Mentions various people who can furnish him with testimonials.  viii, 5

Bartley, James.
to any artificer
1778 December 201p.box 1

Orders to shoe three horses belonging to Gen. Muhlenberg's brigade.  xii, 93

Bartley, James and Samuel Edmu.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 161p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Desiring a return of wagons and horses in the Maryland line, also a few necessary remarks upon their condition.  vi, 72

Bayley, Jacob, 1726-1815.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 92pp.box 1

Sends by way of Major Whitcomb what accounts he has collected. Has orders to build a slaughter and storehouse at Charlestown (N.H.) to be used for an enterprise into Canada. His opinion of his plan. Thinks America's independence insecure until there is a union of Canada and the thirteen States. Must have $ 12,000 at once.  iii, 3

Beatty, Charles.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 271p.box 1

Fredericktown - Acknowledging favor of 10th inst. and promising to aid Col. Bland and Mr. Davenport in all things. Unless his department is enlarged by the addition of Frederick county, he does not choose to act any longer, for reasons heretofore stated.  x, 43

Beatty, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 172pp.box 1

Commissary of Prisoners' Office - Asking him to transmit certain papers to Col. Greene. All houses in the vicinity of headquarters taken. His office requires constant attendance on the Commander-in-Chief. Would suggest that the Rev. Dr. Belmain give up his house, as he can carry out his duties with equal regularity at a greater distance. Would like the General to point out the proper measures for his removal.  iv, 5

Beatty, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 241p.box 1

Commissary of Prisoners' Office - This bearer, Lt. Col. Drake, of the Virginia Line, being a prisoner on parole to the enemy, is returning to his captivity in New York. His horse being lame, begs another one for him as far as Elizabeth Town.  iv, 4

Belding, Simeon.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 231p.box 1

Camp, Reading - Has applied in vain to Captains Hubbard and Star for tents for Gen. Parson's brigade, which is in good order and fit to march.  v, 69

Belding, Simeon.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 251p.box 1

Reading - Concerning a supply of portmanteaus and tents.  vi, 10

Belding, Simeon.
to George Olney
1779 November 71p.box 1

Camp, Drake's House - Acknowledging his note by Major Troop. Will do all in his power to furnish the forage ordered by Gen. Greene.  ix, 15

Berry, Sidney.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 62pp.box 1

Repairing of boats in New Jersey. Desires orders respecting boats and teams. Captain Clinton will report on damages.  ix, 12

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Berry, Sidney.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 31pbox 1

Ordering him to make certain sales and settlements connected with the breaking up of camp.  vi, 12

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Berry, Sidney.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 232pp.box 1

New Windsor - Acknowledging favor of 19th. Undoubtedly his right to dispose of public property left at Mr. Wallace's. General paid him (Mr. Wallace) $ 10,000 for rent and for any inconvenience he was subject to from the Generals residing with him; no other inhabitant received any compensation for use of his house. Requests to dispose of the huts and other public property in the best manner for the interest of the public; better dispose of boards at private sale.  vi, 88

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Betts, William M. and other as.
Udny Hay
1779 October 54pp.box 1

Fishkill - A protest against their treatment in the department. Comparing their present state with that upon which they first undertook the work, and their pay and privileges with those of other officers. Announcing their willingness to serve until November 10, at which time they are fully determined to resign, unless some provision is made adequate to their services.  iii, 54

Betts, William M. and other as.
Udny Hay
1779 October 81p.box 1

Fishkill - Acknowledging his favor of the 6th inst., and expressing pleasure at his approbation of their principles and conduct. Their attachment to their country and their obligations to him, have decided them to remain until the close of the campaign; but they earnestly request his influence in obtaining a more generous establishment for the department.  iii, 56

Betts, William M..
Udny Hay
1779 October 103pp.box 1

Fishkill - Acknowledging his favor of the 6th inst., but unable to concur with the other gentlemen, his assistants. Honored by his approbation, and has given his arguments the strictest attention, but does not think it right to make a complete sacrifice of his interest. Unfair treatment they have received. Gratitude and friendship for Col. Hay, and should he be embarrassed by his resignation on November 10, he promises "to continue some little time after, but his services shall be rendered gratis, on the score of friendship, not as a public office.  iii, 58

Betts, William M..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 31p.box 1

Fishkill - Artificers hired by the day quit work on Monday Last. They have presented him with proposals, of which the enclosures are copies. Col. Hay gone to Rhynebeck (Rhinebeck) to inspect the rafts there.  iii, 5

Betts, William M..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 1

Acknowledging, in Col. Hay's absence, his favor of equal date. Col. Hay's intention to wait on Gen. Greene early in the morning.  iii, 4

Bevan, Davis.
to Charles Pettit
1779 October 241p.box 1

Philadelphia - Has written several times begging him to honor an account; as he really needs the money; will take his compliance as a singular favor.  viii, 6

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Ichabod Burnet
1778 November 81p.box 1

Quaker Hill - Concerning the supply of grain in various quarters.  x, 45

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 254pp.box 1

Camp, Middlebrook - Acknowledging favors of 20th and 22nd inst., with an acceptable supply of money from Col. Pettit. Scarcity of forage on account of great land carriage. Complaints against Col. Bostwick give him great pain. Thinks the purchasers of forage should have an allowance made for their incidental expenses. Arrival of a fleet of sail at York laden with oats and flour. The first fleet, depended on for provisions, is still missing.  ix, 13

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Robert Lettis Hooper
1779 January 252pp.box 1

Extracts of letters between Biddle and Hooper, Wadsworth and Hooper and Hooper and Biddle regarding providing forage to Camp Raritan, particularly the transportation from the Delaware to the North River.  iv, 46

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 273pp.box 1

Raritan- Favorable reports from Col. Hay concerning forage and horses. Difficulty of getting in forage. Roads to Trenton and to North River must be repaired. Mr. Forman's and Col. Hooper's inability to provide the required amount of forage. On the strength of a report that the enemy were preparing to cross over from Staten Island to Jersey, got ready for them, but they failed to materialize. Thinks they might attack Elizabeth Town. Would like to have the Brigade Artillery.  viii, 7

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 112pp.box 1

Philadelphia - Excessive amount of forage consumed. Efforts he is making to supply Pulaski's Legion. Prices rising and forage scarce.  iv, 7

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 203pp.box 1

Philadelphia - Amount of grain forwarded. Sorry to learn from Col. Finnie of Virginia, that their bay is full of the enemy's cruisers, which prevents him from sending any of the forage to the Head of the Elk. Has written to Col. Pettit to suggest to the Committee of Congress the advisability of clearing the bay. Rumor from Congress of some foreign intelligence of great importance raised the valuation of money, but only for the moment. Hopes the publication of the good news will add to the money's value.  iv, 6

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 241p.box 1

Philadelphia - Announcing the birth of a son. Large consumption of grain by the horses. Will set out for camp on Sunday.  x, 5

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 221p.box 1

Raritan- Enclosing one set of the returns of his department and promising others.  i, 76

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 273pp.box 1

Middlebrook - Informing him what States can be depended on for supplies of forage. Advising that the inhabitants of certain districts left at home to cut the hay and grain. Asking that the question of pasturing the horses can be presented to His Excellency.  v, 83

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 281p.box 1

Camp - Report of the state of the scythes. Has sent a person to collect all the bags in certain districts, as the waste of grain without them is very great.  v, 89

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
177 May 281p.box 1

Raritan - Mr. Furman having left, returns the letter to Gen. Greene. Insufficient pasturage for horses.  v, 91

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 311p.box 1

Raritan - Arrival of fifty horses in good condition. Amount of grain forwarded.  vi, 20

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 September 201p.box 1

West Point - Col. Clarke under marching orders for South Carolina. Asks Col. Biddle to give him a supply of money to furnish him with forage on the road.  iv, 26

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 292pp.box 1

Morristown - Enemy has not destroyed any hay at Quibble Town and only eighty or ninety tons at Raritan, after which they returned to Amboy, leaving their commander, Col. Simcoe, and one or two others, prisoners. Report of their burning Brunswick, false. Has given orders to provide Gen. Sullivan's army at Morristown.  iii, 8

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 303pp.box 1

Raritan - Account of the landing of the enemy, 900 strong, at Amboy; the property destroyed and plundered, and the number of men killed. Question of forage and stores; fears for them should the enemy land again. Scarcity of flour on the North river.  iii, 7

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 33pp.box 1

Murderer's Creek - Report in detail of the ground under the mountain back of Quibbletown and Scotch Plains. Question of wood, water and the hauling of forage.  iii, 12

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 34pp.box 1

Murderer's Creek - Enclosing returns of the damage done by the enemy in Jersey. Amount of hay in different towns; where he ordered it to be sent; did not want to leave it exposed to the enemy. Glad that Gen. Maxwell's brigade is marching to take post at Westfield. Difficulty in procuring forage for Gen. Sullivan's Troops.  iii, 13

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 64pp.box 1

New Windsor - Concerning the most northerly position the army wintering in New Jersey could take, in order to be furnished with necessary supplies. Prospects for winter quarters. Amount of forage in the different States. Plans suggested, in case of arrival of Count d'Estaing should decide a movement toward New York.  ix, 14

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 91p.box 1

New Windsor - Acknowledging favor of 8th inst. Amount of feed for horses; both this, as well as all the army supplies, depends on their being furnished with money speedily.  ix, 16

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 112pp.box 1

New Windsor - Enclosing (Col.) Bostwick's letter with an account of the difficulties of getting the forage down the river. Hopes they may get a sufficiency for their horses. Would like to know the different positions and routes they are to take, and when they are likely to move.  iii, 11

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 122pp.box 1

New Windsor - Wishes to know by what route the army will move to Jersey, that he may make the best provisions for the horses. Disposition of the cavalry. Inhabitants persuaded with utmost difficulty to keep the horses in the country for some days longer. Uneasy at not being able to get forage down the river.  ix, 17

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 1

New Windsor - Begging him to order Mr. Van Court to call on him for money, in order to take certain horses off and make way for others.  iii, 9

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 202pp.box 1

Stoney Hill - Report of the ground from Scot Plains to Quibbletown Gap. Thinks the military position a good one. Would be happy to view the ground with Gen. Greene.  ix, 18, 18a

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 273pp.box 1

Bullion's Tavern - Mr. Lodge's and Maj. Burnet's opinions of the ground at Stoney Hill. Will proceed himself to Pluckemin, on the north side of Dead river, and see if there is any ground suitable for encamping. Expects to proceed home the next evening for fresh clothes and horses.  ix, 19

Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814.
to Nathanael Greene
n.d.1p.box 1

Near Pluckemin Station, Sunday Morning - Found several positions between Bullion's and Pluckemin, for single brigades. Desires to know where Gen. Greene (?) will meet him. ix, 20

Biddle, Owen.
to Pettit
1779 May 182pp.box 1

Philadelphia - Reluctant to make such large demands on him, but it is absolutely requisite that they be furnished with the enclosed estimate. No forage can be procured without money, and no horses supported without forage.  v, 20

Biddle, Owen.
to Pettit
1779 November 54ppbox 1

Copy of letter enclosed to the President of Congress by Col. Pettit, to show the demands upon the department and the lack of money to meet them.  ix, 101, 101a

Binney.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 181p.box 1

Somerset Court-house - The two churches and court-houses, of which they have legal possession, being crowded to a degree dangerous to the health of the wounded, has applied to the magistrates for the neighboring barns to accommodate the convalescents. In answer, they threaten to imprison the first who shall "prostitute a barn to the use of sick soldiers." What's to be done?  v, 39

Binney.
to Story
1779 May 192pp.box 1

Somerset - Has made an estimate of the number of buildings needed for the sick, and finds that three large barns will be necessary, as near Somerset Court-house as possible. On verso Camp, Middlebrook - Agreeable to instructions and the foregoing estimate, has taken up three barns belonging to Ernestus Harlingen, Esq., and Messrs. Duryee and Vandoran.  v, 42, 42a

Bland, Theodorick, 1742-1790.
to Capt. Rice
1779 April 232pp.box 1

Headquarters, Charlottesville - Col. William Finnie failing to appear as ordered, requests and authorizes Capt. Rice to take upon himself the management of the Deputy Quartermaster-General's department, until Col. Finnie shall appear or give reason for his non-appearance. Giving him minute instructions as to his duties in the department.  v, 45

Blodget, William.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 243pp.box 1

Philadelphia - Mrs. Greene's phaeton to be repaired by Saturday. Finds upon inquiry that the most advantageous opening for himself is a captain of marines on board the Dean Friday. Expects to drink tea with the Governor that afternoon and will present Gen. Greene's compliments. The city in commotion owing to a publication threatening vengeance on monopolizing speculators unless prices are reduced to what they were the Christmas before. Various arrests made. Inhabitants to hold a probably stormy meeting at the State-house.  v, 64

Bond, Thomas, 1743-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 101p.box 1

Informing him that his boy has gone through the small-pox but is now fit for service. They pleasure it has given him to have this opportunity to testify to the obligation he was under to Gen. and Mrs. Greene. Desires some order concerning the boy.  vii, 57

Bostwick, Andrew.
to Clement Biddle
1779 November 72pp.box 1

Red Hook - Acknowledging letter of 3d inst., and expressing the utmost pain that the garrison at West Point is suffering for want of forage. Reasons for this state of things. Pressing need for money.  iii, 10

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 23pp.box 1

Providence - Acknowledging favor of 12th inst., with $ 140,000. The letter countermanding the order to pay Jacob Greene, Esq., $ 20,000 was carried to Boston by mistake, and nearly the whole amount was paid to him. Amount of disbursements. Report of the provision made for the horses. Asks for cash.  viii, 8

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 81p.box 1

Providence - Acknowledging favors of the 26th and 27th ult. Matter of returns. Has had no success in procuring vessels to bring rice. Exorbitant terms on which a few could be had. Accident to horses. Engaged George Benson to take the place of Mr. Olney, who is leaving. Pays him $ 100 a month; hopes the General will consent to this. Mr. Olney carries his account to the 1st inst.  iv, 10

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 152pp.box 1

Providence - Enclosing returns of stores on hand, with list of persons employed and their pay. Will dismiss his express as he hears that those on the communication to headquarters are called in. Amount fifty sail of transports observed coming down the Sound; cannot learn if they have troops on board. Applied to Mr. Otis for duck for knapsacks.  iv, 9

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Icabod Burnett
1779 February 161p.box 1

Providence - Acknowledging favor of 9th inst. Enough tents and knapsacks and cooking utensils for the troops to Providence. Sends return of stores.  iv, 8

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 63pp.box 1

Providence - Enclosing accounts and returns for past month. Unless speedy supply of money arrives, will not be able to procure a single tone of hay. If Glover's brigade has orders to march, they will rob the department of necessary horses.  vii, 38

Bowen, Ephraim.
to George Olney
1779 May 102pp.box 1

North Kingston - Acknowledging letter with returns and enclosures. Mr. Timmins embarked on ship bout for New York. Gen. Gates is with him (Bowen). Pestered for money from every quarter. Little matters of business.  vii, 62

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 222pp.box 1

Providence - Want of cash. Directed by Gen. Gates to apply to him (Gen. Greene). Thinks the devil has possessed everybody who has anything to supply the army with. Carters refuse to move unless paid at once. The day before a party of Tories landed at Quidnisit (Quidnick) and took eleven of Col. Greene's blacks; they left a small vessel which grounded with five men.  v, 57

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 251p.box 1

Providence - Has no doubt that Gen. Greene has used his influence with His Excellency in order to help them in their difficult situation. Tory villains landed at Quidnick and burnt Thomas Allen's house, taking cattle and prisoners. Enemy upwards of 5500 strong.  v, 72

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 302pp.box 1

Providence - Concerning resolve of Congress, depriving those deputies who transact business on commissioners, from receiving pay and rations. Gen. Gates displeased at having a letter for him enclosed in Col. Bowen's packet.  v, 101

Bowen, Ephraim.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 62pp.box 1

Ringwood - Acknowledging letter of 30th ult. Assuring him that he will have every advantage which the other deputies enjoy. Gen. Gates' consequence shall never be insured in future by having his letters enclosed in Col. Bowen's. Money to be forwarded to him in five or six days.  vi, 15

Bowen, Ephraim.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 131p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging his favor of 8th inst. with enclosed petition, which shall be sent to Gen. Sullivan. Reasons for thinking he will not grant it. Benefits allowed captors.  vi, 61

Bowen, Ephraim.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 282pp.box 1

New Windsor - Acknowledging favor of 21st. inst. Has consulted Gen. Washington upon the subject of the Rhode Island expedition; says he knows of no such expedition either having been ordered by Congress or otherwise authorized. Warns him, therefore, not to take a single step without written orders to justify his conduct; this will secure him in the future.  vi, 92

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 33pp.box 1

Providence - By his brother, Oliver Bowen, has transmitted accounts to September 3, and returns of stores and person employed. Is doing everything to complete the barracks, but one article needed is cash, which, if Gen. Greene cannot give him, begs him to direct Mr. Pettit to give to his brother. Rations and pay of artificers. Enclosing papers containing the State bill and the famous Act of the Assembly; committee engaged in looking into it.  iii, 21

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 103pp.box 1

Providence - Acknowledging favor of the 3d inst. Immediately ordered wagons to be put in best order possible. Cannot find in the town a pair of blankets of any description; will send to Boston for a pair. Arranged posts for expresses. Would like an answer to his letter on artificers' rations. Report of a large fleet, supposed to be French, sighted to the west of Block Island.  iii, 19

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 262pp.box 1

Newport - Informing him of the evacuation of the island by the British army on the previous Monday night. Gen. Gates landed on Tuesday morning and marched into the town with great regularity and good order. English left hay, straw, wood and coal behind - no other stores. Promises him a pair of English blankets.  iii, 15

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 62pp.box 1

Newport - Acknowledging favor of 30th ult. Has laid hold of every piece of duck in the town. Desires his directions as to the destination of the hay. Continental troops are leaving for Hartford, by way of Greenwich. Hopes supply of cash will arrive soon.  ix, 21

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 102pp.box 1

Providence - The bearer, Mr. Mitchell, leaves the brigade against the wishes of all the officers, as he wanted to go to headquarters to get his family from Long Island. Will send the pair of breeches and waistcoat as soon as they are finished.  iii, 20

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 112pp.box 1

Providence - Enclosing returns of stores and persons employed for November. Late in getting it off as the General required his constant attendance on him; left him at Voluntown in a very good humor. Troops will be at Hartford by Monday. Has put the horses belonging to artillery out to pasture until they are wanted.  iii, 16

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 252pp.box 1

Providence - Enclosing a journal of the siege of Savannah found on board a British sloop which put into the harbor of Newport, not knowing that their friends had evacuated that town. Wants order for clothing. Will forward accounts in December. ix, 22

Bowen, Ephraim.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 242pp.box 1

Providence - Acknowledging favors of 10th and 13th insts., and enclosing return of all his employees in the department. Matter of clothing for himself and other officers. Question of supplying the sloop Argoand the Pigotgalley with duck.  viii, 9

Bowen, Oliver.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 101p.box 1

Gen. Howe's Headquarters, near Poim Bridge - Announcing his arrival with a packet containing the Quartermaster's accounts entrusted to him by Col. Bowen. Will wait on Gen. Greene the next day.  iii, 18

Brodhead, Daniel, 1736-1818.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 264pp.box 1

Pittsburgh - Acknowledging favor of 13th inst. Glad Gen. McIntosh is to go to the southward, but thinks his temper will be as disagreeable to the inhabitants there as it was in this district. Gen. McIntosh's tactics in the last campaign. His own command in fair condition. Dispute between Gen. McIntosh and Col. Steel. Wishes Gen. Sullivan great success against the "black caitiffs of the North." Case of a young Delaware Indian, son of the late Capt. White Eyes, a noted warrior, who is desirous of joining the expedition. Delay in receiving salt provisions. High wages of artificers; poor soldiers kept to the old rate without a murmur.  v, 77

Brooks, D..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 241p.box 1

Directed by His Excellency to apply to Gen. Greene for wagons to convey certain stores.  vi, 6

Brown, Benjamin.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 291pbox 1

Newark - Would have returned to camp long before; only waiting on account of expectations from over the water. Refers to business with a certain person, a friend of Major Forsyth's, whom he has not yet been able to see.  viii, 10

Brown, Benjamin.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 181p.box 1

Finds from the books that Mr. Joseph Webb is charged with £1500. Account brought from Ledger A, which book Mr. Story has locked up.  iii, 29

Brown, William.
to George Gray
1779 April 71p.box 1

Asking him to repair the bearer's gun.  xii, 75

Brown, William.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 271p.box 1

Smith's Clove - Orders from Gov. Livingston and Gen. Washington to remove the sick out of the barns of the inhabitants of New Jersey and to apply to Col. Berry to provide them with quarters in the barracks and public buildings in Pluckemin. These accommodations very inconvenient and improper for the purpose, but necessity compels him in the future. vi, 94

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Brown, William.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 21p.box 1

General Hospital, Otterhill - Asking for a horse for the Bearer, Mr. Scott, who is Commissary for the hospital and is obliged to ride about the neighborhood a good deal.  iii, 30

Bruen.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 21p.box 1

Camp - Ordering him to collect and send to Pluckemin all the boards and materials, etc., from the barracks, and then follow the army  vi, 13

Buchanan, John, 1743-1822.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 11p.box 1

West Point - Desiring authority to impress vessels for the transportation of the Carolina brigade.  iii, 28

Bull, Samuel.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 1

Middleton - Dimensions and number of boats at Chatham shipyard.  ix, 23

Burnet, Ichabod.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 231p.box 1

Asking him to forward the enclosed papers to his brother at Newark, as they are wanted for a particular purpose.  iii, 17

Burnet, Ichabod.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 271p.box 1

Philadelphia - Sending him his bridle by bearer. Expects to leave Philadelphia by the following Friday.  viii, 11

Burnet, Ichabod.
to Charles Pettit
1779 February 91p.box 1

Gen. Greene anxious about returns from office at Philadelphia, and requests him to forward copies of all returns as soon as possible.  xi, 6

Burnside, James.
to Moore Furman
1779 November 143pp.box 1

Pittstown - Copies of orders sent at different times, respecting boats collected.  ix, 42

Butler, Richard, 1743-1791.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 201p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - In receipt of his favor that morning. Horses with pack-saddles ordered to attend his party.  vi, 74

Caldwell, James, 1734-1781.
to unknown correspondent
1778 September 272pp.box 1

Springfield - Account of the appearance of the enemy with eleven or twelve sail of brigs, sloops and row-galleys heading toward Crain's Ferry. The General not being able to see their rear, and supposing they were coming in force, called all the militia out and moved down in force to receive them; but they turned and stood up Newark bay and then up Hackensack river; they had some supplies for the troops there and will also render that river a defense by their armed vessels. They have in their power near one-half of Bergen county. Surmises as to their intentions, and detailing their various movements.  iv, 11

Caldwell, James, 1734-1781.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 272pp.box 1

Springfield - Informing him of the advent of the enemy the day before and the damage to property. Asks him to use his influence with His Excellency to have the whole or part of the Jersey brigade stationed somewhere near Westfield. The magazines of hay are of vast importance and the State troops on duty are insufficient even to alarm the country - i.e.: the enemy reached Bound Brook a little after sunrise and the alarm was given at Elizabethtown around 11 o'clock. 4000 militia ordered by Legislature to be in readiness but only to turn out at the advent of the French fleet. Stores in imminent danger. Note - The foregoing letter is from Rev. Dr. Caldwell, whose wife was killed by the British on June 7, 1780, and himself shot in November 1781. They left nine children. viii, 12

Chaloner, John.
to Jeremiah Wadsworth
1779 October 271p.box 1

Ringwood - Injurious practice of feeding horses with wheat in straw; mentions the matter that measures may be taken to prevent it.  viii, 103

Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 51p.box 1

Boston - Acknowledging favor of 14th ult., with certain moneys. Hopes ere this that Gen. Greene and Major Lee have received their wines. Gives high prices of various articles. Sent on returns a few days earlier.  viii, 13

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Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 91p.box 1

Boston - Acknowledging favor of January 29th. Navy Board has tent cloth for about 1000 tents, which he will immediately apply for and have made up.  iv, 13

Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 21p.box 1

Boston - Enclosing account and returns. Tents gone to Springfield. Difficulty of procuring teams - $ 5.00 a mile demanded for carting. Has sent on some of the lead ordered by Board of War.  vii, 19

Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 314pp.box 1

Boston - Enclosing account and returns for the month of May. Detailing the reasons for employing certain artificers, boatmen, etc. Mr. Hewes' just claim to a British schooner, captured when the enemy evacuated Boston. Accounts of Mr. Pynchon. High prices of teams; depreciation of money accounts for it.  v, 102

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Chase, Thomas.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 111p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 31st ult. Refuses responsibility in settling Mr. Pincheon's affair. Want of attention shown by the States to the business of the department.  vi, 49

Chase, Thomas.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 301p.box 1

Smith's Tavern - In receipt of alarming letter from Board of War, relative to a quantity of lead failing to come on from Boston; it must be got at any cost; a failure may be attended with dreadful consequences. If unable to procure teams, must call on Mr. Smith of Springfield, Mr. Hubbard of Harford, for assistance. Admires Gen. Heath's tent; wishes four of five like it.  vi, 109

Chase, Thomas.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 September 292pp.box 1

West Point - Sorry to inform him that there is great complaint against him on the Commissary General's department for want of teams to bring forward the public stores to West Point; does not understand the reason of this, the roads being good and teams plentiful. Sets forth the serious harm resulting from any delay in hurrying forward the stores.  iv, 27

Chase, Thomas.
to George Olney
1779 October 42pp.box 1

Boston - Acknowledging favor of September 18, and glad his accounts are satisfactory. No interference in his department by the Executive power of the State. For a long time has been amused by Count d'Estaing being on the coast, but begins to despair.  iii, 26

Chase, Thomas.
to George Olney
1779 October 41p.box 1

Copy or draft of previous letter.  iii, 25a

Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 122pp.box 1

Boston - Acknowledging his favor of the 29th ult. Surprised at complaints made against him by the Commissary Department. Would like to know who made the complaint; things there has been as much expedition shown in his department as in any on the Continent. Teamsters are paid any price to transport private property from Boston, and naturally they prefer it to carting public stores. Brewer has returned without money and therefore will not be able to send on the stores. Salt stopped on the road owing to not having a pass.  iii, 25

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Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 211p.box 1

Boston - The bearer, Mr. Brewer, has the charge of 100 lbs. of powder. No more stores can be procured without an immediate supply of money, as teamsters insist upon being paid as soon as the work is done. Generally by the time they received their money, it had depreciated one-half. Difficulty of procuring the teams even by paying the money down.  iii, 24

Chase, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 11p.box 1

Boston - Enclosed accounts and returns for November. Never was more distressed for money. Can neither send on stores nor procure anything. The money depreciating so fast nobody will trust the Continent one day. Self-interest the only principle in the political world.  viii, 14

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 63pp.box 1

Eastertown - Accounts of stores received from Col. Mitchell and their indifferent quality. Col. Morgan's stores and those of Col. Patton in good order. Wants the pack-saddles, procured by Col. Hooper. Question of engaging boatmen and their wages. Size and convenience of certain boats.  vii, 39

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 62pp.box 1

Results of consultation with Col. Cox on the subject of bateau-men. Does not know where the stores are coming from; will be deposited at Sunbury as fast as they arrive.  vii, 40

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 173pp.box 1

Estherton - Acknowledging letter of 10th inst. Saw that Col. Patton received the same orders as Col. Morgan. Has consulted Col. Cox on all measures relating to the Quartermaster Department. Lack of steel in the axes received will render most of them useless. Doubts Col. Mitchell's diligence, and states his reasons for this opinion. Mentions men appointed by Col. Cox to engage boatmen. Favorable outlook in the matter of boats and boatmen. Enclosing Mr. Redick's returns of provisions.  v, 19

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 182pp.box 1

Estherton - Acknowledging letter of 14th inst. Number of boats employed in carrying provisions to Wyoming. Employing more boats and recruiting boatmen. Supplies from Philadelphia coming in pretty fast. Sparing no exertion to accomplish everything according to en. Greene's wishes.  v, 17

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 182pp.box 1

Eastertown - In great hopes of having everything in the boat was completed in a short time. Not prejudiced against Col. Mitchell as a private gentleman, but really astonished at the condition of the stores he sends. Describes the rottenness of the leather, harness, linen, etc.  v, 18

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 241p.box 1

Estherton - Mr. Morrisons' company of boatmen complete and will be down the Wyoming with the large boats. Col. Mitchell's stores coming in very slowly. Boatmen wish same rations as boat-builders, also a blanket apiece, they being exposed to the weather day and night.  vi, 5

Claiborne, Richard.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 221p.box 1

West Point - Maryland division waiting for their clothing. Mr. Belding wishes to know if his assistance is necessary in quartering the light dragoons at Wallingsford.  ix, 28

Claiborne, Robert.
to Burnside
1779 June 212pp.box 1

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging letter of the 14th and 15th insts. to Gen. Greene. Certain directions from Gen. Greene relative to the route the provisions must take.  vi, 87

Claiborne, Robert.
to James F. Abeel
1779 September 131p.box 1

West Point - Acknowledging his favor of 6th inst. to Gen. Greene. A Court of Inquiry ordered at Morristown to investigate the business and charges between Col. Claiborne and Mr. Lewis. Desires him to pay Mr. Collis his wages.  iv, 24

Claiborne, Robert.
to Benjamin Stoddert
1779 September 131p.box 1

West Point - Directed by Gen. Greene to acknowledge his favor of the 18th inst. with the enclosed resolve of Congress for erecting barracks at Rhode Island. The General has given the necessary orders agreeable to the resolution.  viii, 15

Claiborne, Robert.
to Jacob Weiss
1779 September 131p.box 1

Acknowledging favor of the 3d inst. Directions regarding the return of stores.  ix, 25

Claiborne, Robert.
to John Cox
1779 September 161p.box 1

West Point - The army is to be cantoned and the greater part to quarter at the Scotch Plains. Gen. Greene requests him to have 200,000 feet of boards deposited at some convenient place in that neighborhood with dispatch and secrecy.  ix, 26

Claiborne, Robert.
to William Betts
1779 September 171p.box 1

West Point - Acknowledging his favor of same date. General wishes him to propose to the shipwrights to continue a week longer upon their present standing; but if they decline, to discharge them.  iii, 47

Claiborne, Robert.
to William Betts
1779 September 191p.box 1

West Point - Acknowledging favor of 18th inst. The General only wants the carpenters engaged for one week more. If at the end of that time, no further directions are received, he can discharge them.  iii, 48

Claiborne, Robert.
to Col. Thompson
1779 September 291p.box 1

West Point - In answer to his favor to Gen. Green, dated the 30th of September, asks him to furnish the twelve wagons and teams called for from the line of the army of from the Commissary's department.  iv, 12

Claiborne, Robert.
to John Cox
1779 November 51p.box 1

Directed by Gen. Greene to write him to procure the cloth for the bags, but not to have them made until he hears further from the General.  viii, 16

Claiborne, Robert.
to Udny Hay
1779 November 51p.box 1

By Gen. Greene's order, writes to direct him to send all the unemployed carpenters to West Point and to send Capt. Mills with his company to King's Ferry.  ix, 27

Claiborne, Robert.
to James Thompson
1779 November 111p.box 1

Directs him, by Gen. Greene's orders, to be at Fishkill the following day to attend a horse sale, and to purchase wagon and express horses. Has referred the Auditor of Accounts to him for two teams.  viii, 17

Claiborne, Robert.
to Udny Hay
1779 November 151p.box 1

In Gen. Greene's behalf, acknowledges his favor of same date enclosing copy of a letter from Col. Van de Burgh, respecting the wages of express-riders. They are allowed $ 16 a day, find their own horses and bear their own expenses. Demand for boards at King's Ferry.  viii, 18

Claiborne, Robert.
to George Gray
n.d.1p.box 1

Order to shoe Dr. Thatcher's horse.  xii, 90

Clark, Thomas.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 271p.box 1

Paramus - In future will send weekly returns. Wants tents for his soldiers.  ix, 29

Clay, M..
to George Gray
1779 April 71p.box 1

Orders to repair Charles Carter's gun.  xii, 73

Clinton, Charles, 1734-1791.
to George Morgan
1779 April 201p.box 2

Fort Cumberland - Has opened the road from the above place to Turkey Foot, except four of five miles. Money needed to pay hands. Enclosing survey. (Copy)  vii, 20a

Clinton, George, 1739-1812.
to James McDowel
1779 January 121p.box 2

Poughkeepsie - Informing him that Gen. Washington will lay his case before Congress, who will no doubt order an equitable compensation for his loss. (Copy)  i, 15

Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786.
to George Clinton
1779 June 281p.box 2

Smith's Clove - Col. Hay in immediate want of about $ 100,000; begs the Governor to loan that sum to the department, promising to replace it in a week or two in the treasury. Most of the money to be appropriated for the Indian expedition. Col. Hay will wait upon him for an answer.  vi, 97

Clinton, George, 1739-1812.
to Udny Hay
1779 November 83p.box 2

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of equal date concerning the present dispute of the artificers about their wages. If the representation made by them to the Governor is true, he thinks their demands are reasonable. How far it will be proper to comply with these demands, declines to determine.  ix, 55

Colfax, William.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 21p.box 2

Headquarters - Applies to him once again for six pounds of nails and fifteen boards.  viii, 19

Collins, Stephen, ca. 1758-179.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 162pp.box 2

Philadelphia - Setting forth the case of Sarah Whitbread who, having obtained a pass to New York, was on her way back with sundry goods, which were taken from her by an American officer who gave her a receipt for them. Most of the articles intended as presents for Mrs. Collins. Ask for some redress.  iv, 14

Collins, Stephen, ca. 1758-179.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 161p.box 2

A list of sundry goods belonging to Mrs. Whitbread, stopped by Capt. Stokes, commanding officers at B. Town. Enclosed with previous letter.  iv, 15

Cooper, Constant et. al..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 271p.box 2

Thanking Gen. Greene for his care in securing the property of the public.  i, 94

Cotton, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 41p.box 2

Croton River - Desiring to know the duties and privileges attached to the office of Brigade Quartermaster, in order to settle on or two disputed points.  vii, 33

Cotton, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 111p.box 2

Middletown - Acknowledging his favor of 26th utl. together with Gen. Washington's to Moses bush, requesting him to procure a number of scows. Has put his carpenters to work on them and is pushing the work through.  viii, 20

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 162pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Will inquire into the prices of pack-saddles, and if they can be had at 3 pounds will order 500 of them. Dispatched an express to Col. Patterson and will accompany him to camp on his arrival. Mrs. Cox and family send compliments to Mrs. Greene.  iv, 16

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 162pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Just honored with his favor of that morning and sends the horse by bearer. Congress has received some very interesting intelligence, which is affected to be kept a profound secret. Many conjectures as to its nature. Has had a considerable effect in reducing prices. Pennsylvania's tax bill under consideration. Report of five or six of the enemy's armed vessels being carried into Chesapeake bay by two Continental frigates. Intelligence received that the schooner Hunterhas brought in a prize.  iv, 17

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 181p.box 2

Bloomsbury - Expects Col. Patterson by Saturday or Sunday at farthest, when he will be able to accompany him.  iv, 18

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 83pp.box 2

Mount Holly - Acknowledging favor of 6th inst. Flatters himself that the articles ordered to be deposited at Estherton are there, and those for Fort Pitt are on their way up. Unable to say when wagons, horses, etc., requisite to enable His Excellency to make a general movement of the army, can be in readiness. Expects to have a handsome supply of teams, etc., at camp by the middle of May. Every possible exertion being made by himself and all his deputies. Sudden death of his brother, Mr. William Cox.  vii, 49

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 103pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 6th inst. Has given orders to every deputy in his department to forward wagons, horses or stores of any kind to camp. Detailing the different articles needed and where he is procuring them. Difficulty in obtaining watermen on the Susquehanna. Col. Davis' report of what he is able to send. Col. Pettit distressed by demands on him, which multiply hourly.  vii, 65

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 112pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 10th inst. Will write to agents countermanding orders, but fears it will not be in time. Every possible exertion has been made to expedite the Indian Expedition. Number of tents, etc., sent by Col. Mitchell. Will forward them to camp unless otherwise directed.  vii, 69

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 114pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 10th inst. With enclosures. Reasons for the major's objections to the pack-saddles. Thinks himself that they are superior to those made by Col. Hooper. Quality of axes ordered. Stores from Philadelphia as good as those procured elsewhere. Best write for pack-saddles. Promises every exertion in raising bateau-men.  vii, 70

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
Extract of letter to...
1779 May 111p.box 2

Easton - Acknowledging letter of 10th inst., which he laid before Gen. Sullivan. Gen. Sullivan's wishes concerning the pack-saddles.  vii, 87

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 183pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Enclosing invoice of stores going and gone. Amount of supplies furnished by Col. Mitchell. Col. Davis writes of the scarcity of forage. Wages of boatmen engaged by Col. Morgan. Boats cannot proceed up the river without a sufficient guard to defend them. and there is not a soldier there for that purpose. Asks for advice about horses sent to Mr. Furman who has no forage for them. Road to be opened across the great swamp to Wyoming. Fears that unless spirited measures are taken the populace are likely to think the Staff department composed of rascals. Maj. Blodget weather-bound at Bloomsbury, diverting the ladies on the spinet.  v, 21

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 192pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Will procure and send forward stores for Col. Hay. Obliged to give $ 6.00 a day for bateaumen. Hopes to be with him in a day or two, ashe is now quite strong.  v, 31

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 211p.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 20th inst. Ordered Mr. Mitchell to Forward 200 portmanteaus to Easton with all possible dispatch. Canteens had better be ordered from Middlebrook. Other articles sent.  v, 48

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 311p.box 2

Bloomsbury - Has hurried on the wagons. Will set out for Philadelphia early the next morning, from which town hopes to sent portmanteaus and tents in plenty.  vi, 24

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 64pp.box 2

Ringwood - Enemy's designs difficult to interpret from his movements; they have fallen back to King's Ferry again, after being in full view of the fortifications at West Point, without attempting to make any impression upon the works. Loss of a little of fort by Gen. McDougall on the east side of King's Ferry. Enemy's purpose to cut off their communication with the Eastern States. Difficulty of subsisting their cattle and keeping up the necessary transportation through such a barren country. Plans for subsisting the troops in case West Point is invested, and for transporting provisions and forage. Necessity for removing clothing at Middlebrook as fast as possible to somewhere back of Morristown.  vi, 27

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 92pp.box 2

Camp, Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 5th inst. Will rest satisfied in full expectation of plentiful supply of stores. Will lay his letter before the General in order to have an officer appointed to the command of the watermen; conflicting accounts from that quarter. Directions as to forwarding the store back into the country from Middlebrook. Enemy making no attempt on West Point, but fortifying King's Ferry.  vi, 37

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 141p.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Business of enlisting wagoners must be pursued with more vigor; if hey cannot be had at the present rate of payment, it must be raised.  vi, 65

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 202pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Desiring him to make such arrangements at Middlebrook as will render Col. Thomson's further stay there unnecessary. Will change position again immediately if enemy fall across the river. Needs of the Eastern army.  vi, 80

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
Circular letter to Q.M. Deputies
1779 July 81p.box 2

Circular letter to the deputies in the Quartermaster department to the westward of the Delaware, asking for a general return.  x, 18

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to John Davis
1779 July 282pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 24th inst. Gen. Hand's extraordinary demand for horses to transport stores to Wyoming. Cannot consent to Col. Davis' complying with such a request.  ix, 30

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 22pp.box 2

Philadelphia - Acknowledging letter of 26th ult. Has prevailed on Major Eyre to join the army whenever Gen. Greene thinks his presence necessary. Number and destination of the flat-bottomed boats on hand. Wishes to know if more shall be built. Desires the earliest intelligence of the arrival of the French fleet, that he may join Gen. Greene before he enters the city. Great rise in the price of provisions, foreign and domestic.  iii, 27

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 63pp.box 2

Philadelphia - Acknowledging favor of 27th ult. List of boats sent up to Trenton. More, if wanted, can be built at Easton. Department in great distress for want of cash. Gen. Greene's winter boats in hand. Gen. Knox's saddle will be sent as soon as it can be made.  iii, 23

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 102pp.box 2

Philadelphia - Informing him that Major Eyre, at the head of about 100 well-disposed carpenters, intends setting out for headquarters Tuesday morning. Puzzled to know how to raise enough cash to give them each a monthly advance. Terrible demand for cash. Difficulty in procuring canvas for tents; enumerates the number sent on and promises more. Stoves being made as fast as possible. Fast sailing boats, ordered by His Excellency, waiting for the dispatches to Count d'Estaing.  iii, 22a

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 204pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of the 13th inst. Disposition he has made of the flat-bottomed boats. Best route for the boats to take on the Susquehanna. Number of boats nearly sufficient. Badly off for tents and forage; no canvas for the first and no money for the second. Constant demands for cash and not a shilling to be got from the Treasury. Thinks it high time that they should come to a full and complete explanation with Congress. Tremendous rise in the price of boards, forage, etc. Count d'Estaing's success; no particulars as yet. Wagon hire.  iii, 22

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Robert Patton
1779 October 201p.box 2

Bloomsbury - Enclosing a long list of articles wanted in the Quartermaster department for the next campaign. Begging him to get the best materials and have them ready to forward to camp by April 1.  ii, 2 and 3

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 233pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 20th inst., and promising to do his best as regard tents. Black outlook as regards cash. Arguments of no effect with the Treasury. Arrival of thirteen boats; will direct Col. Berry to detain them at the White House until he receives order what to do with them. Lack of forage, owing to Major Gordon not being supplied with money. Cannot make provision for the next campaign without cash.  iii, 34

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Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 23pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 26th ult. from Gen. Greene (?). Number and destination of boats. Reason for ship-carpenters' high wages; advises their dismissal. Good prospect of procuring tents. Has ordered to Morristown every article needed for hutting the troops. Col. Biddle over head and ears in debt.  ix, 31

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 77pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 30th ult. Obliged for the agreeable intelligence of the evacuation of Newport. Measures taken for the safety of boards and forage. Prospect for tents has brightened. Gen. Sullivan's want of economy. Present difficulties in the various departments, owing to lack of money. Begs Gen. Greene to take a peremptory and spirited attitude towards Congress. Disposition of boats. Col. Pettit hastening the settlement of accounts; he has taken a house in Philadelphia; says his prospects for cash were never worse. Scattered situation of boats built in Susquehanna. No prospect of getting forage.  ix, 32

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 174pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Sand bags in readiness. Congratulates him on the arrival of Mrs. Greene. Unless effectual measures are immediately taken to open the eyes of the Treasury and induce them to furnish a very considerable sum to the Quartermaster department, supplies expected from his quarter must assuredly cease. Mr. Pettit only received a small fraction of the cash needed. Suggests the immediate surrender of all appointments and offices, to arouse those at the helm to a sense of their duty. Desires information respecting the boats, also the troops' winter quarters. Mr. Pettit's opinion, and his also, that money will soon be more valuable than any article at the present price. Mr. Pettit's plan, therefore, to turn all their concerns in shipping into cash.  ix, 33

Cox, John, 1731-1793.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 232pp.box 2

Bloomsbury - Acknowledging favor of 20th inst. Mr. Furman's report on the number of boards deposited at various towns. All efforts to get a supply of cash from the Treasury, fruitless. Money depreciated twenty-five per cent., since there repulse at Savannah. has given the necessary directions concerning the craft in the Susquehanna.  ix, 34

Croghan, William, 1752-1823.
to George Gray
1779 April 101p.box 2

Order to repair the bearer's gun, which he has had for two or three weeks.  xii, 77

Croghan, William, 1752-1823.
to George Gray
n.d.1p.box 2

Order for an iron rod to be made for his portmanteau.  xii, 110

Dabney, Charles.
to George Gray
1778 October 271p.box 2

Order to repair a gun belonging to Thomas Collier.  xii, 91

Davis, John, 1755-1783.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 102pp.box 2

Carlisle - Acknowledging favor of 2d inst. Directions respecting tents shall be strictly complied with. Alterations in pack-saddles. Frightened to death about scarcity of forage and difficulty of procuring wagons. Stores and packhorses to be sent forward.  vii, 100

Davis, John, 1755-1783.
to Charles Pettit
1779 May 213pp.box 2

Carlisle - Acknowledging favor of 14th inst. with $ 300,000. Demands on him for wagons and how he meets them. Scarcity of forage. Difficulty of getting drivers; need not expect one, unless they are exempted from militia duty.  v, 47

Davis, John, 1755-1783.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 302pp.box 2

Carlisle - Informing him of the number of horses purchased and the time at which he may expect them. Must pay drivers same wages as boatmen, in order to get them. Account of stores forwarded.  v, 100

Deputies of the Quartermaster'.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 162pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Enclosing a copy of a letter from hon. John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, Nathaniel Scudder, Esqs., members of Congress, a committee appointed for superintending the staff department of the army. Explains the design of this letter and also the returns expected of them in reply. Committee anxious to have this information without the least unnecessary delay.  vi, 73

Sherman, Roger, 1721-1793. Dickinson, John, 1732-1808. Scudder, Nathaniel, 1733-1781.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 132pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 7th inst. Promising to furnish them with the returns and information concerning the plan and economy of the quartermaster's department. Requests punctuality in the returns.  vi, 58

Duportail, Antoine-Jean-Louis Le Bègue de Presle, 1743-1802.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 271p.box 2

Camp - Requesting orders for wagons, tents, blankets, etc.  v, 78

Durie, Thomas.
to Andrew Coldclugh
n.d.1p.box 2

Orders from Gen. Greene not to deliver any forage to Capt. Prior of the artillery.  ii, 37

Eastham, Braxton.
to George Gray
1778 December 61p.box 2

Order to shoe the bearer's horse.  xii, 84

Eastham, Braxton.
to George Gray
1778 December 291p.box 2

Order to shoe four horses belonging to Gen. Muhlenberg's brigade.  xii, 96

Eichelberger, George.
to Jacob Shallus
1779 March 241p.box 2

York - Asking him to send a quantity of salt.  vii, 7

Erskine, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 111p.box 2

Raritan - Writes on behalf of Mr. Weiss, who complains that a private road used by the soldiers leads past the two houses where the stores are deposited, and that two sentries are not sufficient to guard them. Wishes that road stopped, as the public road is equally convenient for the soldiers.  iv, 19

Erskine, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 51p.box 2

Murder's Creek - Has just received his letter concerning the clothing and letters that McDonald Campbell brought from Mrs. Greene. Never saw either clothes or dispatches, though he remembers consenting to Campbell's request that his dispatches might go by some of the expresses who were to leave the next morning for West Point.  iii, 33

Erskine, John.
to Maj. Claiborne
1779 November 81p.box 2

Mr. Southerland's - Enclosing last weekly report. Asking him to sign the blank appointments and send them up at once. Wants to know the charges against Van Court, whom Col. Claiborne has confined; thinks he can assist in the evidence against him.  ix, 35

Erskine, John.
to George Olney
1779 November 151p.box 2

New Cornwall - Enclosing last weekly report; asks him to tell the General that after strict inquiry into the expenses of the express-riders, he finds they will all be willing to stay at $ 20.00 per day.  xii, 9

Erskine, Robert, 1735-1780.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 181p.box 2

New Windsor - In consequence of a not from Col. Morris, has dispatched Mr. Lodge, one of his surveyors, to Morristown; will endeavor to follow himself as soon as possible.  ix, 36

Erskine, Robert, 1735-1780.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 181p.box 2

Morristown - Returns for clothing of Surveying department.  xii, 11

Eyre, Benjamin.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 July 11p.box 2

Philadelphia - Transmits returns of boats, men, and the money spent in his department. Orders form Col. Cox to reenlist about fifteen ship-carpenters. Fears they will not engage without a raise in pay. Condition of boats. Wagon-master should be given a special charge, so that he may not tear the boats to pieces when the road turns and winds.  viii, 21

Eyre, Benjamin.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 11p.box 2

Acknowledging letter of 3d inst. Has been busy ever since collecting one hundred men, a company of which leave for Easton before night. All boats sent on to Trenton. Obliged to His Excellency and to him for their good opinion.  iii, 35

Faesh, John Jacob.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 91p.box 2

Mount Hope - By Col. Abeel's team sends him two saddles of venison.  viii, 22

Faesh, John Jacob.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 111p.box 2

Mount Hope - By Col. Abeel's team sends two saddles of venison, which he hopes Gen. Greene will accept. Intends waiting on him soon.  iv, 20

Ferris, Owen.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 111p.box 2

South Wales - Has sent fifty horses. Wishes to know whether he shall purchase more.  vii, 68

Ferris, Owen.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 151p.box 2

North Wales - Sends him the fifty horses. Wishes to know whether he shall purchase more.  vii, 98

Ferris, Owen.
to John Mitchell
1779 May 201p.box 2

Germantown - Sorry for the complaint lodged against him. Insists that not a horse he purchased that year but was in good order; but the last drove got mixed up with some horses from Lancaster, hence the mistake.  v, 35

Finley, E..
to George Gray
1778 December 61p.box 2

Order to shoe various horses, and to put a hook on one of the cannon.  vii, 94

Finnie, William.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 117pp.box 2

Williamsburg - Acknowledging favor of 15th ult. Detailed reasons why the barracks, near Charlottesville, are impossible as a station for the Convention troops. Defends himself against certain complaints made against him by Col. Aylett. His presence necessary at Williamsburg, and all his exertions needed to collect forage. Quotations from Col. Biddle's letters showing scarcity of forage. Capes and bays infested by the enemy's cruisers and privateers. Armed vessels ordered down to give protection to the provision vessels. Appointment of Capt. Rice to superintend the business of the station. Promising certain returns.  iv, 21

Finnie, William.
to Col. Hollingsworth
1779 May 121p.box 2

Williamsburgh - Acquainting him with Capt. Barret's return from Richmond with the lead, which is now lying on James river and might as well be in the Gulf or Florida. Sorry to inform him that the First Fort in Virginia has fallen into the hands of the enemy, and with it all the shipping in the harbor of Portsmouth and Norfolk and a large quantity of stores. Town of Portsmouth in their possession, Hampton will fall next, York and Williamsburgh in great danger. Enemy landed above the fort at two different places; garrison, being weak, evacuated. Wishes information as to the lead.  vii, 83

Finnie, William.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 211p.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 29th ult., and likewise a letter from Mr. Webb respecting the propriety of Col. Finnie's conduct. Will lay the letter before Gen. Washington, in order to disabuse his mind of any prejudice. Requests punctuality in the returns.  vi, 85

Fitch, Nathaniel.
to Jeremiah Wadsworth
1779 October 251p.box 2

Hartford - Begging him to intercede with Gen. Greene to get him discharged from the Continental service, where he has worked as a blacksmith; has a family of six who are sick and in want, and he is unable to support them on $ 10.50 per day.  viii, 105

Fleming, Samuel.
to unknown correspondent
1780 January 111p.box 2

Paramus - Informing him of the disagreeable necessity Col. Hart labors under for want of forage and money.  i, 8

Flint, Royal.
to Major (Robert?) Forsyth
1779 January 11p.box 2

Asking to let his express take the enclosed, and also to permit him to return with an account of the stores from Mr. Steel.  viii, 23

Flint, Royal.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 2

New Windsor - Amount of bread and flour on hand. Would have waited on Gen. Greene at the Point, but has been unwell for several days.  ix, 37

Flint, Royal.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 2

New Windsor - The bearer, Major Boyd, has 1000 or 1200 bushels of wheat which he wishes to exchange for German steel. Asks him to consider this proposal and inform Major Boyd what is expedient to be done in the affair.  ix, 38

Ford, Foreman James.
to Udny Hay
1779 January 81p.box 2

Fishkill - A petition from James Ford and the men under him to the Colonel, begging that he will use his influence to raise their wages; they cannot support their families on their pay, the price of everything being so high.  viii, 24

Forsyth, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 171p.box 2

Will send all the wagons and horses to camp, agreeable to Col. Cox's order. Morally impossible to get forage; poor condition of the horses already bought. Mr. Patton in Philadelphia on public business. Receipt for stores wanted.  v, 7

Forsyth, Robert.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 141p.box 2

Camp, Middlebrook - Enclosing letters from Col. Hay. Horses all gone except those with Maryland troops. Gave Major Hall Mr. Duer's draft on Abraham P. Lott. Dissatisfaction among Brigade Quartermasters; their extra pay too small, and their work doubled.  viii, 38

Forsyth, Robert.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 272pp.box 2

Camp, Middlebrook - Sorry for the loss of Mr. Andrews. Report that the enemy intend taking an airing in Jersey once more. Ready to execute any order of his Lordship's. Had a most agreeable hop the previous evening; mentions those present; nothing lacking but the presence of Gen. Greene and his lady; kept it up till 4 in the morning.  viii, 25

Forsyth, Robert.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 31p.box 2

Camp, Middlebrook - Acknowledging letter of 31st ult. The arrival of "faithful old John, with his bays in very good order." Sympathizes with Mrs. Greene over the bad roads.  ix, 39

Forsyth, Robert.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 194pp.box 2

Williamsburg - Enemy, after burning Suffolk, retired toward Portsmouth, destroying everything before them. Helpless situation of Virginia; very few arms and accoutrements. Militia ordered to various cities; all hands to be full of fight. Enemy say publicly that their next move will be on Hampton; will push then as far as Baltimore, destroying all before them. Information gathered from one of "our" men who escaped from a British schooner. Pressed on all sides for his services; thinks he will join Gen. Nelson for the present; has expectations of an appointment under Col. Wadsworth. Will render Col. Firmin all assistance possible.  v, 33

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 72pp.box 2

Trenton - Sorry to have missed his visit. Want of money prevents execution of orders. Difficulty of procuring wagons. Does not know how to get supply of forage to North river. Resignation of Mr. Caldwell; unless their salaries are raised, more will follow suit. The attitude of the New Jersey Assembly, relative to further laws for collecting forage.  vii, 41

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 81p.box 2

Trenton - Sends the enclosed by Joseph Davison, express rider, who returns to Mr. Furman's house. Expects on the morrow to load and start seventy wagons, to carry military stores to camp.  vii, 47

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 10 - 112pp.box 2

Pittstown - Acknowledging favor of 9th inst. Number of horses forwarded. Mistakes that happen in forwarding commissary stores. Promising salt beef and bread. Pittstown - In accordance with his demand has dispatched by bearer the eighteen horses; is sending seventeen more.  vii, 61 and 61a

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 301p.box 2

Pittstown - Number of horses he is sending on; will proceed to make up the ten brigades ordered to be raised in this State.  v, 99

Furman, Moore.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 62pp.box 2

Ringwod - Detailed orders concerning the forwarding of provisions on the Sussex route.  vi, 16

Furman, Moore.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 92pp.box 2

Camp, Smith's Clove - Acknowledging favor of the 5th inst. Will endeavor to send back teams to bring on the provisions. Repeats his plan of dividing the route into stages. Advises removing stores at Pluckemin to Susquehanna or Pittstown, should enemy invade New Jersey. Grain of no grain, the provisions must come on to the army; if necessary, the cattle must eat grass.  vi, 38

Furman, Moore.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 122pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 9th inst. No objections to Mr. Lewis, if he is satisfactory in his work; Mr. Abeel's and Mr. Lewis' disagreements not a sufficient reason for dismissing the latter. Account of measures he adopted during Mr. Lewis' illness. Plan for facilitating the transportation of stores. Situation disagreeable, owing to want of money.  vi, 53

Furman, Moore.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 212pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging favor of 12th inst. Inconvenience of not knowing what the next movement will be. Even the General, although acting on the defensive, cannot determine this point, for it all depends on the enemy's movements. Wants pasture for horses provided along the route from Middlebrook. Herculean task on their hands. Afraid good news from the South will turn out to be false.  vi, 86

Furman, Moore.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 241p.box 2

Accepting his resignation as deputy quartermaster general for the State of New Jersey. Sorry that the late oppressive law in his State, dangerous to the rights of citizens as well as to the privileges of officers, has forced him to this measure. Begs him to continue to manage the business in his private capacity until he can appoint another, or until Congress can remedy the effects of this unprecedented measure.  vi, 89

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 11p.box 2

Pittstown - Acknowledging his two favors. Has seen about boards, and has sent orders to erect stables at Burlington to receive the horses. Will look after the boats. Quantity of long forage in the quarter where the troops will pitch their tents. Thinks it probably that New York may be in American hands before the winter, the count being on the wing of their assistance.  iii, 36

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 41p.box 2

Col. Biddle expected at Rariton the next day. Object of his visit, the sending forward of all the salt and flour in the District. Boats at Middlebrook all ready to start. Hopes the gentle folks at New York will be disturbed by their launching.  iii, 37

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 91p.box 2

Pittstown - Will send on forty horses, if it is possible to get them shod today. Horses recruiting at Col. Biddle's farm can be used for the boat carriages, if wanted.  iii, 41

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 91p.box 2

Pittstown - Will send on forty-three horses instead of forty, and expects they will be joined in Somerset county by fifteen or twenty more. If he had not been forbid to purchase, could easily have made up the number called for.  iii, 42

Furman, Moore.
to unknown correspondent
1779 October 182pp.box 2

Pittstown - Enclosing receipt and a copy of a certificate. Accounts of provisions sent to Gen. Sullivan. Number of boards. Boats, harness and horses ready, but at a loss about drivers. Unable to procure any one to visit the posts and make return of commissary and other stores. Matter settled at Georgia.  iii, 38

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 181p.box 2

Just received letter from Mr. Gordan, announcing that his short forage is out and that private purchasers are out-bidding him, giving half as much again for grain. Same intelligence coming from almost every purchaser in the State.  iii, 40

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 192pp.box 2

Morristown - Concerning the expresses and their various stations. Will venture to order two or three more to be fixed at Pompton. No reason in future for letters not reaching Philadelphia with utmost safety and dispatch.  iii, 44

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 192pp.box 2

Morristown - Acknowledging favor of 17th inst., and promising to make up the number of horses. As for the men, thinks a line from His Excellency, Gen. Washington, to the Governor for one militia company will prevent delay. In his opinion, nothing of consequence has yet been proved against Mr. Lewis, and the public suffers merely to gratify private spleen. Longs to hear of the arrival of the French fleet. Advices from Georgia put fresh spirits in the people. Exorbitant price of forage; the more money issued the more it depreciates. Intends applying to the Assembly for some relief. They might follow a law lately passed in New York respecting forage. Salary in his department so low that he has great difficulty in keeping the men in the service.  iii, 43

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 271p.box 2

Trenton - Concerning the expedition from Staten Island; will get a particular account of the damage done as soon as possible. Assembly has met, but the choosing a Governor and other ceremonies will occupy the whole week. After that, will speak to them about collecting the grain in the State; unless they aid him can do nothing. Enemy's object probably the forage; what will be done to save it?  viii, 29

Furman, Moore.
to unknown correspondent
1779 October 291p.box 2

Pittstown - Is informed that he has heard from Col. Berry of the damage done by the enemy on the 26th inst. Uneasy at the exposed situation of the forage. Will make up horses wanted in Lord Stirling's division. Afraid to send boards to Quibbletown until there is a guard there.  viii, 31

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Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 312pp.box 2

Pittstown - Concerning horses for Lord Stirling's division. viii, 28

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 82pp.box 2

Pittstown - Acknowledging favor of 3d inst. Precautions being taken to move certain articles out of the enemy's range. Is able with difficulty to persuade his assistants and foragers to stay with him until the end of the campaign, on account of the low wages. Lack of money. Disposition of horses.  ix, 40

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 152pp.box 2

Pittstown - Acknowledging favor of the 11th inst. from Gen. Greene (?). The double disappointment of the failure in Georgia and the Count's return to the West Indies, will cause the army to move soon. Disposition of boats. Too many horses and too little forage. Concerning the addition of a county to his district when Col. Hooper resigns. Is going to Trenton and Burlington the following day. High price of forage.  ix, 41

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 222pp.box 2

Trenton - Number of boards at Rariton and others being hurried on. Has sent forward horses and flour. The Assembly has promised him their assistant in procuring forage.  ix, 43

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 11p.box 2

Pittstown - Will write immediately to engage ox-teams and horse-teams. Desires information about where the huts are to be erected. Will make every exertion to raise forage.  viii, 27

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 21p.box 2

Pittstown - Advised by his favor of the 1st inst. of the position of the army, and will do all in his power to hurry everything to Mr. Kemple's house. Will give immediate notice to persons in forage department to forward everything to that spot. Feels for the army in such cold and storm.  viii, 26

Furman, Moore.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 242pp.box 2

Trenton - Has received a summons (a copy of which is given) to appear before the Council. Major Gordon quits the department on the 1st of March; also his best clerk. What's to be done? River now impassable; until it opens, intends dismissing teams. Not twenty barrels of provisions to send on.  ix, 44

Galbreath, Robert.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 282pp.box 2

Camp - Requesting him to proceed with the utmost dispatch to Reading and other near-lying towns and procure as many bags as possible, get a wagon and bring them to camp.  v, 86

Gamble , Robert, 1754-1810.
to the Armorer
1779 October 161p.box 2

Order to mend the bearer's ramrod.  xii, 69

Gibbs, C..
to Benjamin Brown
1779 May 271p.box 2

Headquarters - Concerning payment for two horses.  v, 79

Gibson, George, 1747-1791.
to George Gray
1778 December 301p.box 2

Order to shoe his horse.  xii, 86

Gibson, George, 1747-1791.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 311p.box 2

Giving details of the route by which the Six Nations may pass undiscovered to the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek or Choctaw Nations.  viii, 32

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Gibson, George, 1747-1791.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 September 271p.box 2

West Point - Acknowledging his letter of the 15th inst. with its enclosure. Maj. Blodget, not having acquainted him with his borrowing a sulk of Col. Gibson, has written to him on the subject, asking certain things about it, to enable him to settle with Col. Gibson.  iv, 36

Gooch, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 183pp.box 2

Boston - Narrating his difficulties in getting hay or grain. Complains bitterly of his present pay, as compared with that of a commissary of hides or deputy commissary of prisoners. Sets forth his expenses and the inadequacy of his pay. Declares, when the war is over, he must take the highway with a pistol for a maintenance. Language inadequate to express the political situation. Scandalous treatment of his friend, Major Mersereau. "His little ribb" sends her most respectful compliments.  iii, 46

Gooch, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 242pp.box 2

Boston - In September, 1777, was Assistant Deputy Quartermaster-General at Springfield under Col. Chase. Recalled to Boston in November. Settled all his accounts with Col. Chase except that the Colonel refused to pay him four hundred and odd pounds., which he had advanced to the teamsters, to procure teams to transport certain articles to the southward. The teamsters have never been paid, and neither has he. Asks that the money may be paid.  viii, 33

Gooch, John.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 253pp.box 2

Boston - A long letter, setting forth the evils resulting in the department from lack of money and the ill-will of the numerous creditors and duns. Cannot purchase in time for want of money. Wishes to know if the staff officers are entitled to draw clothing from Continental store.  viii, 34

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 111p.box 2

Trenton - Informing him of the purchase of a pair of horses. Promises to send about twenty hoses along with the pair.  vii, 71

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 152pp.box 2

Trenton - Number and description of horses sent forward.  vii, 102

Gordon, Peter.
to Mr. Brown
1779 May 211p.box 2

Trenton - Acknowledging favor of 20th inst. Has forwarded the boards, and will send oats and barley for use of the General's family. Difficult to get teams.  v, 49

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 271p.box 2

Trenton - Sends by bearer a load of barley for the General's horses.  v, 80

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 281p.box 2

Trenton - Acknowledging favor of 27th inst. Report of stores sent forward. Twenty horses in fine condition awaiting orders to be sent on to camp.  v, 85

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 201p.box 2

Trenton - Acknowledging favor of 17th inst. What he has done in the way of stationing expresses. Constant application for horses by officers, escorts or express riders, but cannot possibly have fresh horses always ready.  iii, 45

Gordon, Peter.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 41p.box 2

Trenton - Thinks he can spare eight or ten brigades to assist in collecting boards, etc., for hutting. Warns him to place a guard over them, as the wagon-master will try to give him the slip. No commissary stores on hand.  viii, 36

Gorham, Nathaniel, 1738-1796.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 211p.box 2

Boston - Having heard of Mr. Andrews' death, takes the liberty of offering his services in his place. Mentions various people who will vouch for his suitability for the position.  viii, 35

Greene, Catharine Ray, 1731-1794.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 71p.box 2

East Greenwich - Desiring arrangement of the officers in his regiment established by the War Office. Plea for Capt. Arnold. Still unhappy in Gen. Gates as a commander. Reasons for wanting his small services transferred to another State.  vii, 42

Greene, Jacob.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 61p.box 2

Ringwood - Order to furnish Col. Bowen with a quantity of axes.  vi, 29

Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786.
Circular letter
1779 June 302pp.box 2

New Windsor - Setting forth the necessity of keeping and transmitting accounts of the time the expresses ride public horses, in order to prevent certain impositions. Necessary for every assistant to have a copy of this order.  vi, 105

Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786.
to unknown correspondent
1779 June 134pp.box 2

Smith's Tavern - His Excellency will write concerning an officer to superintend the bateaux service. No blame due him on account of the teams not coming in faster. Hopes to feed the army without much difficulty. Comparative power of Pennsylvania and New Jersey to furnish teams. Col. Hooper engaged in arranging this matter upon the Sussex route. Flatbottom boats to be repaired. Treasury Board responsible for the unmerited disgrace that the department has been loaded with. Tents needed. Suffering with pain in the breast owing to constant writing; hopes he will relieve him soon.  vi, 62

Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786.
to unknown correspondent
1779 July 142pp.box 2

New Windsor - Acknowledging letter of 8th inst. enclosing returns, etc. Repeats the necessity of keeping no one on pay whose services can possibly be dispensed with. Arrival of Glover's Brigade will be a timely one, Connecticut being in deepest distress. Asks for certain accounts. Refers him to Maj. Olney for news.  x, 16

Greene, William, 1731-1809.
to unknown correspondent
1779 January 153pp.box 2

Warwick - Acknowledging his favor by Col. Morgan. Moralizes on the appearance of luxury. Act enacted by General Assembly to force persons to sell articles possessed by them for the use of the army. Steps which should be taken by Congress to prevent further depreciation of money. William Littlefield's absence so prolonged that he has been left out in the pay abstract.  viii, 37

Greene, William, 1731-1809.
to unknown correspondent
n.d.1p.box 2

Number of men to be employed in the neighborhood of the navigable rivers in the Middle and Southern States. Duties of those employed in the Western expedition. Committee desires estimate of the cost of one year of such an army [fragment of letter].  x, 59

Hale, D..
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 291p.box 2

Fishkill - Enclosing the two letters which he apologizes for having shamefully neglected to deliver in Philadelphia. Will send yellow ochre and tin by a return express. Character of Col. Hay's stallion.  i, 1

Hall, Benedict Edward.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 14pp.box 2

Acknowledging Gen. Greene's (?) kindness in taking him to his suite. The kind of life he has led and is leading. Asks to be remembered to various people. Will attend him some time in April. Wants furlough for that time.  viii, 39

Hall, John.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 271p.box 2

Philadelphia - By direction of Col. Mitchell, forwards pair of canteens for Lord Stirling.  viii, 71

Hall, John.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 February 11p.box 2

Philadelphia - Asking that the enclosed letter be forwarded as speedily as possible, by a safe hand.  ix, 78

Hall, John.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 February 21p.box 2

Philadelphia - Asking him to see that the bearer, Mr. Alexander White, wagon-master, delivers a box of glass to Gen. Knox.  i, 2

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1778 November 81p.box 2

Headquarters - His Excellency requests that two sets of tools be provided and sent to Gen. McDougall to blow up the rocks, which greatly impede his carting.  iv, 52

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 41p.box 2

Headquarters - At the General's request, desires his opinion of the number of expresses necessary to be kept in constant pay.  viii, 40

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 231p.box 2

Headquarters - Desires to know by bearer how far the preparations for vessels have gone and the amount of material provided; the General's idea being to stop as short as possible, without leaving what is on hand incomplete.  i, 4

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 201p.box 2

Headquarters - Concerning Mr.Duryee's application to have his farm released, which was taken up for the use of the hospital. The General does not wish to discriminate, without sufficient reason, so refers the matter to Gen. Greene, in order that he may relieve Mr. Duryee, if it can be done without inconvenience to others or injury to the service.  v, 40

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 221p.box 2

Headquarters - By a letter received from Gen. Sullivan it appears that Poor's Brigade have left their tents behind. Asks that they may be supplied with them and other necessaries. Gen. Sullivan in "his usual pother, but dispatch is certainly very desirable."  v, 59

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to unknown correspondent
1779 May 311p.box 2

Middlebrook - Bidding him at the General's request to send some discreet person to ascertain the number of boats on the river.  vi, 18

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 August 171p.box 2

Headquarters - Desiring that he furnish a good horse, saddle and bridle to Lt. Whitehead, who carries important dispatches to Philadelphia for the General.  iv, 51

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 71p.box 2

Headquarters - It is determined that Gen. Duportail and himself shall go to Count d'Estaing. Four horses will be necessary; therefore asks for an order on the person at New Windsor who provides horses for Gen. Greene.  iii, 88

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 January 211p.box 2

Ordered by the General to ask if horses to carry the surgeon's chirurgical apparatus can be obtained from him [Greene] or from the brigades.  i, 5

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Major Burnet
1780 January 281p.box 2

The General considers the application unusual, and does not think it proper to comply with it.  i, 3

Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 231p.box 2

Headquarters - Orders from the General to send some pontoons (?) form Fishkill for the use of the officers.  viii, 41

Hand, Edward, 1744-1802.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 81p.box 2

Mendham - The number of huts laid down in the general plan, viz., 24, to cover twelve men, not being sufficient, desires instructions immediately as to what alterations shall be made.  i, 6

Hansen, Peter.
to Udny Hay
1779 April 91p.box 2

Fishkill - Sends him at his request an account of clothing.  xii, 26

Harmar, Josiah, 1753-1813.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 111p.box 2

Headquarters - Asking for an order for a saddle, as the duties of the inspectorship requires a great deal of riding.  i, 7

Harrison, Alex. Turner.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 December 61p.box 2

Desiring him to engage a hundred wagoners for one year, and telling him the terms he is to make.  xii, 6

Harrison, Robert Hanson, 1745-1790.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 51p.box 2

Desiring to know whether the horses are ready for the officers going to Egg Harbor. If not, wishes them sent to New Windsor. Desires the express with the duplicate dispatches to be sent to Gen. Sullivan.  iii, 89

Harrison, Robert Hanson, 1745-1790.
to unknown correspondent
1780 January 251p.box 2

Requesting him to transmit to His Excellency a return of the number of express employed in service.  i, 9

Harrison, Robert Hanson, 1745-1790.
to unknown correspondent
1780 February 241p.box 2

Introducing the bearer, Daniel Halsey, an old soldier, who has a strong desire to become one of his expresses.  i, 11

Hart, William D..
to Nathanael Greene
1780 January 131p.box 2

Paramus - Has sent out a party to secure a boat of his [Greene's], which drifted down. Difficulty of procuring anything on certificates, as the people are disgusted, no cash having been supplied to pay them since '77.  i, 10

Harvey, John, 1745-1812.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 September 291p.box 2

West Point - Acknowledging favor of the 1st., recommending the appointment of Mr. Rice a deputy quartermaster-general to the convention troops. Believes Mr. Rice an honest man, but neither a good accountant nor well versed in the forms of business.  iv, 30

Haws, Samuel.
to George Gray
n.d.1p.box 2

Order to repair the bearer's bayonet.  xii, 88

Hay, Hawkes.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 201p.box 2

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging letter of 16th inst. Has written to Mr. Kearse to give him every assistance in removing his family and things out of the way of the enemy. Exceedingly sorry for his misfortune; offers any assistance in his power; has Gen. Washington's approbation for what he is doing.  vi, 79

Hay, Udny.
to Pynchon, George
1778 May 211p.box 2

Fishkill - Concerning the building of three scows and one bateaux. Gen. Greene has ordered the matter put in execution immediately.  xi, 89

Hay, Udny.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 32pp.box 2

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of 26th December, respecting artificers in Lt. Bolton's company. Will look into their complaints and, if just, they shall be redressed.  viii, 57

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 53pp.box 2

Fishkill - So many complaints made to him and of him that he has requested the General for a court of inquiry. Desires hides sent on. Debt of the department to the artificers ought to be paid in money or clothes. Concerning his accounts. Will go to Congress on his own affairs as soon as Major Hale returns. Major Hale will handle the subject of cash with suitable eloquence.  viii, 50

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 93pp.oversize 1

Fishkill - Smiths and wheelwrights determined to leave unless their wages are raised. By the offer of such extravagant wages, Mr. Simmons has a second time depreciated the money. He [Col. Hay] is even suspected of pocketing that part of the wages which, by leaving the post, the artificers can easily get elsewhere. Suggests procuring artificers from the regiment. Matter of cordage. Need of a proper public tanner. Pay for teams. Concerning the completion of the works at West Point during the coming summer. Hopes Gen. Greene is homeward bound, loaded with money. Enclosing two addresses, concerning the wages of workmen.  viii, 42

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 92pp.box 2

Fishkill - Asks that he will intercede with His Excellency to obtain clothing for the artificers, who deserve some encouragement for remaining at their posts.  viii, 44

Hay, Udny.
to George Clinton
1779 January 208pp.box 2

Fishkill - Setting forth the difficulties of procuring teams for public service, and the unpleasant consequences of not getting a sufficient number of them. A most alarming circumstance is that the interest of the country and the interest of the army appear to be totally opposite to each other. Takes the liberty of laying before His Excellency certain hints which might, if the Legislature thought fit, aid matters. Pressing and immediate need of something being done.  iv, 56

Hay, Udny.
to Robert Forsyth
1779 January 211p.box 2

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of 14th inst. Sends the tin by Dr. Latimer. Cannot recommend his black horse which, like many of the fair sex, is slow and cannot bear fatigue.  viii, 51

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 213pp.oversize 1

Fishkill - Gentry of the staff have a considerable share in the alarming depreciation of the money. High price of teams. Waited on Governor Clinton with a letter to lay before the Assembly containing a plan for the quicker raising of carriages for public service. Delay in his accounts. Matter of returns.  viii, 43

Hay, Udny.
to unknown correspondent
1779 January 232pp.box 2

Fishkill - Desiring to know the number and situation of tents the recipient of this letter has drawn.  ix, 47

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 13pp.box 2

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of 26th inst. No problem of obtaining clothing for the artificers. Workmen's complaints concerning wages. Many evils which have arising from Col. Lewis' conduct. Sends return for December. Plan of putting tanyard near the banks of North river.  ix, 45

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 103pp.oversize 1

Fishkill - Large supply of cash lately furnished, inadequate to pay the demands on the department; therefore entreats for another supply; thinks $ 100,000 will cover all debts. Desires his opinion on how fatigue men should be raised for the ensuing campaign; also the wages of certain workmen. Dispute with the justices as to the means of procuring teams. Legislature has brought in a bill nearly adopting his own plan for furnishing teams for the public service. The advantage of a uniform price in certain articles. Inconvenience of having no Justice of the Peace nearer than ten miles. Money needed to pay for wintering the horses.  iv, 63

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 131p.box 2

Fishkill - The bearer of this, Mr. Stewart, will wait on Gen. Greene for positive instructions respecting the wages of the artificers engaged by the day. Must not lose either the wheelwrights or the smiths. Has passed his word that the matter shall be fully settled by the end of the month.  iv, 61

Hay, Udny.
to unknown correspondent
1779 February 132pp.box 2

Fishkill - Detailed orders concerning returns and accounts.  ix, 48

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 181p.box 2

Fishkill - In answer to his letter by Capt. Pendleton, has not heard a single complaint since the men joined Capt. Sizer's regiment. Were he convinced it would be of any service to the public, would willingly remove them.  iv, 55

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 191p.box 2

Fishkill - Asking for a full supply of blankets. Difficulty in procuring teams. Oldest man in the country never remembers to have seen a winter so bad for the business of transportation.  iv, 53

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 191p.box 2

Difficulty in procuring teams. Oldest man in the country never remembers to have seen a winter so bad for the business of transportation.  iv, 54

Hay, Udny.
to Sir James Jay
1779 February 214pp.oversize 1

Fishkill - Takes the liberty of making observations on the bill now under the consideration of the Legislature for regulating the impress of carriages for the army; makes certain suggestions and amendments. Thanks him and other gentleman of the Legislature for the indulgence he has met with on this subject.  iv, 60

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 233pp.box 2

Fishkill - Acknowledging his favor of the 17th inst. Difficult to separate provisions sent to French fleet from provisions sent to American army. Received the $ 30,000, but would like the other $ 70,000 to fully settle his accounts. Little dispute with some of the Justices tolerably well settled. Enclosing his first letter to the Governor, proposing a new mode of raising teams. Will be glad of any amendments.  iv, 58

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 242pp.box 2

Fishkill - Concerning the method of paying Capt. Lamb's company of wheelwrights.  ix, 46

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 1115pp.box 3

Fishkill - Wagoners to be exempted from military duty during their term of service. Praises the Governor for the pains he has taken to serve the department. Difficulty of impressing teams. Wages of fatigue men. Question of forwarding the seven traveling forges. Scarcity of horses; the cheapest cost $ 1000 apiece. Waiting patiently for supply of cash. Col. Robert Livingston's iron works; needs 4000 cord of wood. Difficulty to procure pasture. Sends copies of returns. Payment of certificates for transporting baggage of the Convention troops. Asks for late resolve of Congress respecting treatment of staff officers charged with any crime. Wages of artificers. Has written Col. Smith to hasten the stores from Springfield. In want of canvas for tents. Gives reasons for differing with Gen. Greene about a court of inquiry.  vii, 72

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 122pp.box 3

Fishkill - has just been informed of some clothing, which will be moth-eaten should it lie by all summer. Asks that a proper portion may be used for the artificers at the post.  vii, 82

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 124pp.box 3

Fishkill - Praise for his assistants. Gen. Greene's recommendation to Congress to advance assistant quartermaster's pay to $ 140 per month at first sight appears generous; on second thought, considers it inadequate to their services, considering their expenses. Must raise artificers' wages or lose them. Officers of artificers beg dismission from the service, producing certificates to show that their families are starving for bread, - no wonder! with wheat at $ 25 per bushel!  vii, 81

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 223pp.box 3

Fishkill - Requesting a large supply of cash. Wages of artificers. His fears of a want of provisions for the army in the vicinity. The numerous calls upon the State of New York as compared with Connecticut. His differences with Capt. Starr on the subject. Has a severe tough of fever; if it continues, will be obliged to go to the seaside for a fortnight. Miscarriage of His Excellency's dispatches to Gen. Clinton.  v, 54

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 262pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of the 24th inst. Will supply the Governor's wants as soon he knows them. Concerning the purchase of horses. Called up the night before by an express from Gen. McDougall, announcing probable attack by the enemy on his (Col. Hay's) quarters. His embarrassing situation without a penny to pay for anything. Will try to borrow from the Treasurer.  v, 70

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 91p.box 3

Camp, Smith's Clove - His Excellency, Gen. Washington, desires return of all the boast on North river. Happy to hear of his success in the removal of stores. Questions of tents and canteens.  vi, 35

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 141p.box 3

Smith's Tavern - Distressed for wagoners at Middle Brook. Begs that he will send him all the carters from his side of the river.  vi, 69

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 192pp.box 3

Fishkill - Directions of his Excellency concerning the places at which to deposit the public stores.  vi, 76

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 201p.box 3

Smith's Tavern - Acknowledging letter of the 14th and 15th insts. has sent to His Excellency for permission to assist Col. Hawkes Hay in the removal of his family. Has written the Board of War for a copy of new regulations in the Barrack department, and to Congress for a copy of resolution respecting artificers.  vi, 81

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 281p.box 3

New Windsor - Enclosing letter to Governor Clinton. Forgot about it, owing to press of business. (copy)  vi, 101

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 302pp.box 3

New Windsor - Acknowledging favors of 28th, 29th, and 30th. If Col. Hay cannot go on with the business, he must make application for the aid of the line. Sorry he did not succeed with Governor Clinton. However, if all other sources fail, will furnish the horses himself, out of his own much needed number. Mr. Pettit expects to send him (Col. Hay) some money soon.  vi, 99

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 June 301p.box 3

New Windsor - In receipt of alarming accounts from the Board of War, they having been disappointed of a quantity of lead expected from Boston; if any has arrived at Fishkill or Claverack, wishes it forwarded to Newburg.  vi, 103

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 July 82pp.box 3

New Windsor - Acknowledging favor of the 8th, concerning the advisability of punishing wagoners. Thinks on the whole, although some little good might result from prompt punishment, yet the ensuing alarm would produce more injury than benefit to the department.  x, 20

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 July 101p.box 3

New Windsor - His Excellency's orders that the two Connecticut brigades shall be put in motion and marched down toward Norwalk. Concerning flour and portmanteaus for the brigades; also the teams to more their baggage with the greatest dispatch.  x, 17

Hay, Udny.
from Nathanael Greene
1779 September 271p.box 3

West Point - Acknowledging favor of 26th inst. Urging him to employ every person he can muster to aid in getting the boats ready. Will engage the artillery artificers to assist in the business.  iv, 33

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 11p.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of 30th ult., and will do his best to forward the boats. Must have fatigue men. Large quantity of forage at Claverack and other landings needs to be brought down. The bearer of this has fourteen horses to deliver, in tolerably good order.  iii, 90

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 23pp.box 3

Fishkill - Wishes copy of a certain resolve of Congress. The pay given the carpenters from Philadelphia, necessary as it was, has set all the rest of the department in a ferment. Comparisons being made all the time between New York and other States. Demands for higher wages. All this makes a very disagreeable situation. Difficult to get carpenters to repair bateaux.  iii, 91

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 51p.box 3

Fishkill - Advises sending parties of twenty men each to Albany to collect all bateaux, etc. , on either side of the river and bring them down to Fishkill Landing.  iii, 92

Hay, Udny.
to William M. Betts and other Assistant Quartermaster-Generals
1779 October 64pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging their favor and agreeing with them in the justice of their complaint. Begs them, however, not to desert their country at such a critical moment, but to remain until the close of the campaign, promising to do his best then to obtain some satisfaction for their grievances.  iii, 55

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 73pp.box 3

Fishkill - Carpenters ready to work on the boats, but as yet no boards have arrived from Albany. Asks that a number of boards and planks be sent up from the fort and with them a small fatigue party to expedite the work. Uneasy about tar; expects to seize some, thought it be private property. Fourteen horses will set off for New Windsor.  iii, 50

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 81p.box 3

Fishkill - Concerning a supply of tools for the carpenters. Totally destitute of handsaw files; advising him how to procure some more, and of the quickest way to send them.  iii, 51

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 91p.box 3

Fishkill - Enclosing extract from a letter of Col. Lewis. Thinks the building of the bateaux should claim precedence of the cooper's shop. Plenty of boards at Saratoga. Will forward any letter to Col. Lewis that Gen. Greene may think proper to write.  iii, 52a

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 104pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging favors of 7th and 9th inst. Disposition made of the 120 privates sent. Steps taken to purchase the needed boards. Duck enough to complete 170 tents, and will then patch up all the condemned ones. Thinks the vessels are sometimes unnecessarily detained at the fort; asks Gen. Greene to mention this to the engineer and Mr. Buchanan. Plans for getting sufficient hay. Question of the wages of bateaux men. Has sent to Col. Pettit for cash. Would it be possible to obtain $ 50,000?  iii, 67

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 142pp.box 3

Fishkill - Sends camp-stools by bearer. Will need large quantity of clothing. Wagoners destitute of blankets. Wants an answer from Gen. Greene to paragraph in Col. Lewis' letter relating to the raising of bateaux.  viii, 53

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 141p.box 3

Fishkill - - Distemper raging among the horses has proved extremely mortal; the farrier, after a tolerably decent flogging, has run away; wishes a good one might be procured, who could save many of their lives. Camp-stools, which were forgotten, have been sent.  iii, 68

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 151p.box 3

Sends by bearer a chest with a lock of his own construction, which cannot easily be picked. Hopes it will please the General.  iii, 69

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 162pp.box 3

Fishkill - Begging him to procure for them files and nails wherever they can be obtained. Encloses the determination of the judges respecting the price of teaming and forage. Mistake of officers about collecting the bateaux. Reminds him to send the farrier.  iii, 70

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 191p.box 3

Acknowledging his favor of the 17th and Major Burnet's of the 18th insts. Good prospects of obtaining nails. Has directed two of the largest sloops to be sent to Albany for boards. Boat-builders destitute of clothing; would wish them either supplied with clothes or returned to their regiment, the service they do being trifling.  iii, 71

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 217pp.box 3

Fishkill - Regrets to trouble him in the midst of public business; necessary, however, to set before him the grievances of his assistants. Compares their salary before the depreciation of money with the amount they now receive. A whole year's pay inadequate to buy them a suit of clothes. Hard case of Mr. Whiting. Demonstrates the fact that poor pay produces poor service. Earnestly requests him to make application to Congress of the department must be broken up. Encloses letters to prove that it was his wish to postpone this matter till the campaign closed. Suggests that the pay should be changed according to the fluctuations in the state of the money. Discontent of the assistant quartermasters not surprising, when they know that a common laborer receives four times their pay.  iii, 53

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 212pp.box 3

Fishkill - Received from Col. Pettit $ 171,000, which, if the remained of the campaign prove active, will last but a short time. Scarcity of tents; suggest the building of temporary huts. Question of supplying the riding horses of the officers of militia with hay and grain, and also the wagon horses needed by the different regiments. Asks that Thos. Allen, of the Maryland Regiment, a carpenter with a talent for driving on business, may be allowed to pick out his own company of boat-builders, if Gen. Greene things of making an addition to the present number.  iii, 72

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 221p.box 3

Fishkill - Boat-builders at Wappen's creek will not continue unless they receive $ 45.00 a day. Asks what he must do.  viii, 45

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 233pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging three favors of 22d inst. Tents for militia; where they shall camp. Will write the Governor for forage. Arrival of vessel at fort with military stores and boards. Maj. Ayres' men boasting of higher wages, and thereby creating discontent. Concerning the necessity of getting a supply of provisions to the garrison at West Point.  viii, 55

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 252pp.box 3

Fishkill - Carpenters at Wappen creek have quitted work, and refused to begin again until a promise was made them that the bearer would see Gen. Greene and ask that they receive the same wages as Maj. Ayres' men. Col. Hay thinks this request founded on strict justice. Discretion of bearer.  viii, 56

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 294pp.box 3

Fishkill - The bearer, Mr. Stewart, is on his way to King's Ferry to take charge as quartermaster, and waits for instructions. Col. Hubbard cannot get a yard of duck in his State. Advices a halt in the building of the bateaux - no boards will be left for many necessary objects. Gives return of bateaux at Wappen's creek. Caulker needed. Wages of artificers. Smiths demanding equal wages with those in Philadelphia, "that sink of pollution." Without money transportation must stop. Wheelwrights demand a raise in their wages.  viii, 52

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 October 301p.box 3

Fishkill - Desiring information about the cutting of the wood. Impossible to detain vessels without putting a stop to the forage business. Will not bateaux answer for transporting the troops destined for Albany? Asks him to order back the King's Ferry men from the fort, as they are needed at the landing.  viii, 54

Hay, Udny.
to Artificers at Fishkill
1779 November 22pp.oversize 1

Fishkill - Surprised at the ungenerous advantage taken of the public by the artificers in demanding higher wages. Desires to have a return of those who will and those who will not remain, that others may be employed in place of the latter. ix, 52

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 32pp.box 3

Fishkill - Neither hay nor grain at West Point, owing to lack of craft to bring it down the river; suggests laying platforms on boats and bringing it down on them. Vessels in want of rigging, sails and anchors.  ix, 49

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 52pp.box 3

Fishkill - Concerning the wages of the artificers. Encloses letters on the subjects. Wages of express riders.  ix, 50

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 63pp.box 3

Fishkill - Destination of Capts. Mills', Willcox's and Pendletong's companies. Improvements in the store and hospital, and a new guard-house to be built. Necessity of Maj. Ayres' people discontinuing the boat-building. Conditions of certain roads. Number of water-craft must be increased.  ix, 53

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 93pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging favors of 7th and 8th insts. In reply to his remonstrations, the artificers have gone to work. Has applied to the Governor. Forage on the confines of the river cannot be brought down, owing to lack of vessels. Has stopped work on hospital, in accordance with Gen. Greene's order. Not responsible for want of flour. Owes many accounts; his credit sinking in proportion to the depreciation of money. No blankets and shoes.  ix, 54

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 113pp.box 3

Fishkill - If he has not a speedy supply of cash, the business of his department must cease. Hardly anything prepared for the reception of the troops into winter quarters. High price of necessary articles. His principal assistant has left in disgust, and his next oldest declares that he won't receive another shilling unless Congress thinks proper to make his pay in some degree adequate to his services.  xi, 57

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 141p.box 3

Fishkill - Twelve barrels of tents arrived from Messrs. Otis and Henley; has ordered them stored at the landing until further notice.  ix, 58

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 141p.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging favor of 12th inst. Does not know of any preparations made for depositing shoes at King's Ferry. Has desired the quartermaster there to build some log huts for the ferrymen to live in.  ix, 59

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 151p.box 3

Fishkill - Enclosing copy of letter from Col. Van der Berg, respecting the pay his son is to receive as one of the expresses. Asks for information on that head. Must have a supply of boards.  xii, 7

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 November 241p.box 3

Fishkill - Has just been informed that the wife of his old colonel (Col. Hayen) is on the road to the Jerseys. Requests Gen. Greene to ask any of the gentlemen with him to procure quarters for her in the vicinity of the place where the colonel's regiment will be stationed.  ix, 56

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 95pp.box 3

Fishkill - New and almost insurmountable difficulties. Cannot obtain forage owing to lack of money. Nothing can save his department from ruin, and the army from disbanding but the adoption of a new mode of obtaining forage; explains this in detail. The impending storm could have been averted by an opportune supply of cash.  viii, 46

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 91p.box 3

Fishkill - Enclosing a memorandum of stores wanted at once. Would like a supply of saddlers' tools. Wishes to be put in a direct channel for drawing his supplies.  viii, 47

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 93pp.box 3

Fishkill - Grievances of the assistant quartermasters; thinks Congress in all fairness ought to take them up. Wangoners' certificates. The advantage of building two vessels. Complaints of artificers well founded, but out of his power to remedy. Number of shoes purchased. Clothing wanted. Suggests Col. Lewis laying in a stock of forage.  viii, 48

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 December 252pp.box 3

Fishkill - Enclosing returns of officers and men employed in his department, and explains one or two omissions.  viii, 49

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 January 61p.box 3

Fishkill - Telling him to charge $ 100 to the account of Jonathan Ruckman, express rider.  i, 17

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 62pp.box 3

Fishkill - Congratulating him on the latest addition to his family. Recalling the bearer, Hawkes Hay, to his memory, his many virtues and his need of employment.  i, 13

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 97pp.box 3

Fishkill - Acknowledging letter of 2nd inst. His fears for the army. Question of appeal by Congress to the State for supplies. Would rather be the agent for his own State (if it comes into the measure) than risk the embarrassments arising from a State quartermaster. Constitution failing him under the fatigues and annoyances of his position. Busy with cash accounts. Most of their debts to artificers, master of vessels and wagoners, who depend only on this money for the support of themselves and family. In case Congress sends a supply of wheat, has chosen a safe place for storing it. Lack of wagoners. Question of a debt to a ropemaker. Desires printed certificates to give those who bring in accounts and cannot be paid.  i, 12

Hay, Udny.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 February 112pp.box 3

Fishkill - Laying before him an account of damages sustained by a certain claimant; already laid before Congress but evidently overlooked. Waiting for money form the Treasury to discharge his expresses. Want of flour. Will pay Congress a visit soon if they do not assist him. Hears that 600 barrels of flour are coming to West Point form the southward; hopes it is true.  i, 18

Hazen, Moses, 1733-1803.
to Nathanael Greene
1780 January 21p.box 3

Camp near Morristown - Begging him, for private reasons, to facilitate the departure of the Reverend Pierre Bartheaum for Philadelphia.  i, 16

Henry, James M..
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 241p.box 3

Headquarters - Desired by His Excellency to supply Col. Shreve with wagons to move his tents.  vi, 8

Hodgson, Samuel.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 May 121p.box 3

Pluckemin - Asking for an order to procure any quantity of German steel, the nearer to Philadelphia the better.  vii, 74

Holdron, John.
to Capt. Mitchell
1779 October 261p.box 3

Newburgh - Informing him of the decision of the ferrymen, who will quit work on November 17, unless they get better wages.  viii, 58

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to John Ward Veazey
1778 October 271p.box 3

Head of Elk - Appointing him assistant purchaser of grain and setting forth the duties in that business.  vii, 24

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Stanley Byas
1778 November 291p.box 3

Head of Elk - Appointing Mr. Byas assistant purchaser of forage, and setting forth his duties in that position.  vii, 23

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Owen Biddle
1778 December 303pp.box 3

Head of Elk - Acknowledging favor of 18th inst. Details concerning the forwarding of forage. Protests vehemently against the numerous unauthorized purchasers of forage; disastrous consequences of their conduct; asks that measures may be taken to prevent this abuse. America has baffled Britain by bravery and virtue, and in the same year is on the verge of ruin.  vii, 26

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to John Cox
1779 January 221p.box 3

Head of Elk - Begging an answer to his former letters. Questions of forage and flour. Entreats that the bearer, Giles, may return with a supply of cash. Asks him to acquaint Gen. Greene and Col. Biddle with the contents of his letters.  viii, 59

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 January 231p.box 3

Head of Elk - Concerning wagonage from Chester county to Philadelphia.  ix, 60

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 43pp.box 3

Head of Elk - Acknowledging favor of 2nd ist. Has dispatched the packet to Mr. Calhoun at Baltimore. Difficulty of retaining teamsters; their pay and their time of service. Question of paying his under-agents, who are commissioned to buy various products of food. Must offer sufficient salary to encourage gentlemen of fortune, character and business to undertake the work. Question of forage.  i, 19

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 91p.box 3

Head of Elk - Concerning the terms on which to hire the wagons. Will bring his accounts up with him in a few days. Reasons for not sending on more forage; very scarce at present. Wants money.  iv, 50

Hollingsworth, Henry.
to Nathanael Greene
1779 February 103pp.box 3