Benjamin Franklin Papers Part 1 -- Letters to Franklin

Mss.B.F85inventory01

Date: 1730-1776 | Size: 1 section, 1,211 items

Abstract

This is part of the large inventory for the Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss B F85). For complete information concerning this collection, please view the Collection Description.

Digital objects note

This collection contains digital materials that are available in the APS Digital Library. Links to these materials are provided with context in the inventory of this finding aid. A general listing of digital objects may also be found here.

Collection Information

Physical description

1211 items

1211 items

Indexing Terms



Detailed Inventory

Letters to Benjamin Franklin
1730-17761211 item(s)
LII, 14. Meredith, Hugh.
to Benjamin Franklin
1730 July 14D.S. 1p.LII, 14

Dissolution of partnership. All printing material in the office and debts owing to the partners to be the property of Benjamin Franklin.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

I, 1. Morgan, Joseph.
to Benjamin Franklin
1735 July 7A.L.S. 1p.I, 1

Maidenhead. Concerning the printing of a new edition of "The Temporal Interest of North America." Writes out two paragraphs to be added to the manuscript. Amount of money he has paid him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penna. Press, No. 496.

LXVI, 60. Dewees, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1739/1740 January 261 p.LXVI, 60

Sent him, last week, quantity of paper. Now sends by same bearer more, to be placed to his credit.

LXVI, 57. Meredith, Simon.
to Benjamin Franklin
1739 July 291 p.LXVI, 57

Order to let his son, Hugh Meredith, have the sum of £8 on his account; with Hugh Meredith's receipt for the same, and for £6 more borrowed on July 30, 1739.

LXXVII, 32. Meredith, Simon.
to Benjamin Franklin
1739 July 291 p.LXXVII, 32

Order to let his son, Hugh Meredith, have the sum of £8 on his account; with Hugh Meredith's receipt for the same, and for £6 more borrowed on July 30, 1739. Facsimile. For original, see LXVI, 57.

LXVI, 5. Franklin, James.
to Benjamin Franklin
1740 November 5D.S. 1p.LXVI, 5

Philadelphia. Indenture as apprentice to Benjamin Franklin, printer.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

LXXVII, 29 (OS). Franklin, James.
to Benjamin Franklin
1740 November 5D.S. 1p.LXXVII, 29 (OS)

Philadelphia. Indenture as apprentice to Benjamin Franklin, printer. Facsimile. For original, see LXVI, 5.

XLIV, 94. Constant Reader, AB.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1740]L. 3p.XLIV, 94

Requests him to insert the accompanying note in his next paper. The note is a letter to a friend, giving some distinguishing characteristics of a certain species of Gospel-preachers, who would have brought more credit to themselves and good to their fellow-men if they had continued in a secular employment.

General physical description: L. 3p.

Access digital object:
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I, 2. Tennent, Gilbert (1703-1764).
to Benjamin Franklin
1741 September 22A.L.S. 1p.I, 2

Acknowledging his kindness in sending him certain dissenting remarks on his Sermon on Justifications, likewise in sending the "Querists," lately printed by Franklin; intends to write an answer to the former which will deal with the principal matters in the "Querists." Had the pleasure of discoursing with Franklin's brother in his pass through his place. Trusts that notwithstanding Mr. Franklin's gifts of Nature, he may be kept humble and be enabled to improve his uncommon genius for God's glory, his own and others' benefits.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penna. Press, No. 647.

I, 3. Spicer, Jacob, 1716-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1742 September 20A.L.S. 1p.I, 3

Cape May. Asking him to insert the enclosed advertisement; will pay also for his subscription to Mr. Franklin's Gazette.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 4. Dames, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1746 March 16A.L.S. 1p.I, 4

Asking that all his letters may be forwarded to him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXIX, 49. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 June 1A.L.S. 1p.LXIX, 49

London. Books sent by Elias Bland.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLIV, 1 (OS). Whitefield, George, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 June 23A.L.S. 4p.XLIV, 1 (OS)

Thanks him for the preamble to the subscription which has for its purpose the raising of funds for the support of the orphan house in which he is personally interested. [Mutilated.]

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 5. Turner, James.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 July 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 5

Boston. Sends a seal ordered for Mr. Read; apologizes for having kept him waiting so long but has been involved in large, unprofitable silver-smith's work. Regrets the price he mentioned for the seal, the work being far more than he expected; however, will stand strictly to his bargain, and trusts to his generosity to pay the extra amount. Would be glad of an opportunity to do any engraving.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLIV, 2. Rouse, G..
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 July 21A.L. 1p.XLIV, 2

Requests Dr. Franklin to forward to him and letters which he may have or which may arrive for him from Viginia in his care.

General physical description: A.L. 1p.

I, 6. Green, Jonas, 1712-1767.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 July 25A.L.S. 1p.I, 6

Annapolis. Concerning two packets sent him from the Barbadoes by Mr. James Bingham. Increase in his salary and also in his work. Begs Mr. Franklin to send him a parcel of paper and some other small articles by Mr. Daniel Rawlings. The Virginian's speech caused a deal of laughter; well-approved of by some in that colony; has not heard how the Baronet himself liked it. Weather very hot; has been troubled with fever. Sends their hearty respects to Mrs. Franklin and Miss Sally. Rejoiced to see that his brave countrymen are to be rewarded for thier expense in taking Cape Breton.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 7. Dowse, Joseph, 1708-1785.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 July 27A.L.S. 1p.I, 7

Boston. Writes on behalf of Mrs. Steel, to acknowledge the many kind acts of friendship she bath received from Mr. Franklin, also to solicit the cause of his displeasure with her since her departure from Philadelphia. Mrs. Steel's great esteem for him. Requests him to sell her horse and chair and to let him know the sum of her indebtedness.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 8. Cheston, Daniel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 August 2A.L.S. 1p.I, 8

Chester, Maryland. Acknowledging his favor of the 23d ult.; applied to Mr.Edward Scott for the money; will do everything in his power to get it as soon as possible and send it up.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 9. Franklin, Mary Harman.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 August 21A.L.S. 1p.I, 9

Newport. The loss of Captain Grubb's vessel with a great deal of his cargo. Acknowledging a book sent her some time before, called Pamely [Pamcla]. Her daughter, Sarah, has two sons; has taken the elder to keep for a time, both parents being weakly and poor. Heard Mr. Whitfield preach.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Access digital object:
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LXXVII, 31. Franklin, Mary Harman.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 August 21A.L.S. 1p.LXXVII, 31

Newport. The loss of Captain Grubb's vessel with a great deal of his cargo. Acknowledging a book sent her some time before, called Pamely [Pamcla]. Her daughter, Sarah, has two sons; has taken the elder to keep for a time, both parents being weakly and poor. Heard Mr. Whitfield preach. Facsimile. For original, see: I, 9.

I, 10. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 September 7A.L.S. 1p.I, 10

New York. Knows of no one who has any Spanish paper to sell cheap. The Engraver he applied to about the plate, is an idle, lazy fellow, always making excuses; despairs of ever getting him to do it. His Long-Primer almost worn out; asks his advice about sending home for a new one. Received the Pocket Companion, is the Young Man's Companion almost done? His son is recovered but his wife is poorly.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d s., XVI, 189.

I, 11. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 September 21A.L.S. 1p.I, 11

New York. Concerning a debt of Mr. Franklin's he is to pay to Mr. De Lanccy; Sympathizes with him over his frequent losses. Mr. H. deprived of his position as Councillor, and out of the Governor's favor. Certain materials and their prices. The new type he has used in "The History of the Rebellion.' Various articles he wishes sent to him. Thanks God the sickness has greatly abated.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d s., XVI, 190.

I, 12. Cheston, Daniel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 September 28A.L.S. 1p.I, 12

Chester, [Maryland]. Concerning the order drawn in favor of Mr. Edward Scott; has been unable to procure anything but promises. Suggests that Mr. Franklin should write a threatening line or two, which he will take care to deliver and enforce.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 13. Colden, Cadwallader, 1688-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1747 September 28A.L.S. 1p.I, 13

New York. Acknowledging favor of the 29th ult. Is particularly desirous of seeing "The Indian History"; gave Mr. Collinson certain papers on that subject with no thoughts of their being published; the publisher, Mr. Osborne, desires some work; recommended Mr. Franklin to him for trade in that line. Delivered Mr. Franklin's piece on Electricity to Mr. Darling. Asks his aid in the matter of a servant-man, who ran away from him the previous summer; either agree for his time or send him back. Desires news of Mr. Ermet.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LII, 22. Strahan, William (1715-1785).
to Benjamin Franklin
1748 September 2D.S. 1p.LII, 22

London. Power of attorney to Benjamin Franklin to collect money from James Read.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

LXIX, 50. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1750 February 5A.L.S. 4p.LXIX, 50

Visited all the booksellers in London to search for foreign electrical books, and could only find two in French.Has sent a parcel of books to Elias Blands. The guinea came safe. Franklin's curious pieces relating to electricity and thunder gusts have been read before the society and have been admired for their clear, intelligent style and the novelty of the subjects. Is gathering these tracts together with the intention of printing them: Franklin's account with the drawings, two letters of 1747, and two last accounts. The almanac had many things very acceptable. Franklin's American Electrical Opertor seems to put others out of countenance by its novelty and variety. Adds comments concerning on the surprising shock of an earthquake.

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LXIX, 51. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1750 March 27A.L.S. 3p.LXIX, 51

London. Death of the Prince of Wales.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 14. Kalm, Pehr, 1716-1779.
to Benjamin Franklin
1750 September 2A.L.S. 5p.I, 14

Albany. Containing a detailed description of Niagara Falls, his journey there, his reception by Commandant Beaujeau and his French officers; if he finds this letter worthy of being printed in his newspaper, prays him to turn it into better English.

General physical description: A.L.S. 5p.

I, 15. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 February 17A.L.S. 2p.I, 15

Boston. Acknowledging his bill, also the pamphlets sent the summer before. Pleased with Dr. Hamilton's generous defence of good Dr.Thompson, Begged Mr. Franklin's "Plain Truth" of Mrs. Mecom, as he had never seen it. Mr. Kinnersley well-received; through him, has seen some of Mr. Franklin's entertaining experiments. His opinion of this new found element [electricity]. Thinks Mr. Franklin's Rationale on Clouds and Rain, and also on the Aurora Borcalis, appears extremely probable. Would transmit his own observations on the 'Fulmen' if he has the leisure to look at them. Has bad a cold winter. Boston threatened with epidemic of small-pox; Some persons trying tar-water as a preventive; would gladly try anything Mr. Franklin may have heard of, but differs from his brethren in the affair of diet. Wishes him all the happiness in his son that his genius and accomplishments seem to promise.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 118, Note).

LXIX, 52. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 June 3A.L.S. 4p.LXIX, 52

London. Acknowledges receipt of letters. New colonial maps being made. Sends books on electricity.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LXIX, 53. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 July 7A.L.S. 3p.LXIX, 53

London. Publication of a book on Franklin's electrical experiments. Purity of style of Bolingbroke's letters. Pleased with the Dissertation on the Increase of Mankind. Account of books purchased.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 16. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 August 3A.L.S. 2p.I, 16

Boston. Inquires the number that died of inoculation in Philadelphia. Proportion of deaths much fewer than in 1730; thinks this due to the purging method designed to prevent the secondary fever. Decrease in inhabitants.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 118).

LXIX, 54. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 August 12Diss. Ms. 2p.LXIX, 54

Hints on the incorporation of the Germans in Pennsylvania with the English and to check the increase of their power.

General physical description: Diss. Ms. 2p.

LXIX, 65. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 August 12A.L.S. 2p.LXIX, 65

Has given Mr. Franklin's account of the Germans to Mr. Pelham and Lord Halifax, with his own seven suggestions on the incorporation of the Germans with the English, and Parliament will take some measures to remedy the situation. French expedition to the Ohio. Mr. [William] Smith a very ingenious man; pity that he is not more solid and less flighty. Disappointed at the bad luck that attended the transit of Mercury. Franklin's zeal to promote that observatioin is not enough to be commended. Has not yet heard any account of it from any of the colonies.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LXIX, 55. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 September 27A.L.S. 3p.LXIX, 55

Cannot understand the miscarriage of his letters. Is glad the new seminary of learning is so promising. All Europe is in agitation verifying electrical experiments on points. All commend the thought of the inventor.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 17. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 October 16A.L.S. 2p.I, 17

Boston. Acknowledging his favor of Sept. — containing certain observations. Delivered his papers on the weather to his brother [John] Franklin; sorry for his bad state of health. Takes exception to his article on the Water-Spout; hopes to hear from him on the subject.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 118).

XLIX, 4. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 October 20A.L. 13p.XLIX, 4

Boston. Relative to water spouts and his reasons for believing that they descend rather than ascend. Extract from a voyage which seems to have been made by a Mohammedan in 851, relative to water spouts in the Indian ocean.

General physical description: A.L. 13p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, in small part, in Works (Sparks, VI, 139).

I, 18 (OS). Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1752 October 23A.L.S. 1p.I, 18 (OS)

Boston. Enclosing all he has to say on the matter; his motives for expressing these opinions; has not been able to differ with Mr. Franklin in any other of his supppositions, even in this is open to conviction. Announces death of Dr. W. Douglass of an apoplectic fit; left large estate and one child whom he acknowledged as his son but never adopted; no will has been found.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 138).

LXIX, 63. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 January 14A.L.S. 1p.LXIX, 63

London. Disheartened at the loss of Captain Davis. The Proprietor has given him assurance that he will support a rectorship.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXIX, 58. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 January 27A.L.S. 3p.LXIX, 58

London. Dress goods sent to Mrs. Franklin; electrical books to him. His laudable public spirit. Increased hopes of a discovery of the Northwest Passage.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

XLII, 10. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1753 February]A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 10

Boston. Sends an enclosure relative to a new thought in natural philosophy.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: For enclosure, see XLIX, 6.

XLIX, 6. Perkins, John, 1698-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1753 February]L. 3p.XLIX, 6

In reference to a train of milk-white spots observed in the skies.

General physical description: L. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Originally enclosed with XLII, 10.

LXIX, 59. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 March 21A.L.S. 1p.LXIX, 59

London. Sends books by this ship and the next. Duke of Richmond inquired very particularly about the Proprietor. Richard's son.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 20. Mitchell, James.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 May 19A.L.S. 1p.I, 20

York. Acknowledging his facor of 28th ult. The order on him in favor of Mrs. Benger for $100 shall be punctually paid when presented. By next post will send an acct. of the stoves paid and those on hand. Asks him to forward the enclosed to his son-in-law, if he has arrived at New York.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXVI, 6. Holland, Samuel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 June 14D.S. 2p.LXVI, 6

Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Bond for £100.

General physical description: D.S. 2p.

LXVI, 7. Holland, Samuel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 June 14D.S. 1p.LXVI, 7

Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Agreement between Samuel Holland and Benjamin Franklin, printers, as to rent for printing press.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

LXIX, 60. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 July 3A.L.S. 2p.LXIX, 60

London. Acknowledges receipt of letters. Orders eight boxes of seeds from J[ohn] Bartram.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

L(i), 37 (OS). Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 July 12A. L. 4p.L(i), 37 (OS)

Philadelphia. Account of a house struck by lightning. Course of the lightning and observations on its effects.

LXIX, 61. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 July 20A.L.S. 3p.LXIX, 61

London. Glad to hear of the success of Mr. Peter's sermon. The Proprietor's bounty to the Academy. Account of Abbe Nollet's attempt at Paris to declare that Franklin's electrical discoveries could not be verified, and the frustration of the attempt of a nobleman.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Mss.B.F85.di. Harvard College (1636-1780).
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 July 25D.S. 1p.LH-MV-C-8

Cambridge. Diploma of Master of Arts.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

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LXXVII, 30 (OS). Harvard College (1636-1780).
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 July 25D.S. 1p.LXXVII, 30 (OS)

Cambridge. Diploma of Master of Arts. Facsimile. For original, see Mss.B.F85.di.

LXIX, 62. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 September 15A.L.S. 2p.LXIX, 62

London. Has recommended Mr. [William] Smith to Mr. Penn, who he hopes will endow a professorship in the Academy.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XLIX, 5. Colden, Cadwallader, 1688-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 November 19 XLIX, 5

In reference to water spouts.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in works (Sparks, VI, 177).

I, 22. Franklin, John, 1690-1756.
to Benjamin Franklin
1753 November 26A.L.S. 1p.I, 22

Boston. Furnace stands well; the glassmen fully employed in making window glass and bottles, expects the former will be thought good enough to glaze the church. Reasons for the small profits incident to the position of General Postmaster; dishonesty of post-riders. Brother Peter in town and talks of writing to Franklin. Progress of the buildings; a tenant has bespoke one of them.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

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LXIX, 56. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 January 26A.L.S. 4p.LXIX, 56

London. The Proprietor is ardent in promoting schools for teaching the Germans and solicitous about the prosperity of the Academy. A gold medal to be presented to Mr. Franklin by the Royal Society for his electrical discoveries. The aggressions of the French. Hearty wishes that Reverend [William] Smith may have a safe return passage.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

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I, 23. Colden, Cadwallader, 1688-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 February 13A.L.S. 3p.I, 23

Coldengham. Acknowledging his favors of Dec. 6th and Jan. 1st. The value he places on Mr. Franklin's approbation and esteem. His political opinions; his admiration for the English Constitution; thinks America in greater danger from Popular Licentiousness than from any abuse in their governors, though some of them have been bad enough. Lord Halifax's approval of his conduct. Exceedingly pleased with Franklin's observations on "The Increase of Mankind"; the last paragraph being the only one liable to exception, thinks it a pity it should end the discourse. Has been revising his own Principles in order to challenge all opposition. His son David pleased with Mr. Franklin's notice of his performance. Sends Pike's book by his son, Alexander.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

XLII, 43 (OS). Smith, William, 1727-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 FebruaryA.L.S. 4p.XLII, 43 (OS)

London. Sent a long letter to Mr. Penn containing the scheme for Franklin's Academy and the arguments for it. Mr. Penn has come into every part of it and will give a yearly sumy for some time, and when he comes to Pennsylvania intends to give a manor to the Academy for certain purposes. The proprietor had a design in view of his own, of which he intended to be the founder, but after argument, agreed to ingraft his scheme upon Franklin's in the two foundations proposed, provided Mr. Smith would be the person to execute them. To this he agreed, trusting that it would be welcome to the trustees. Sees a great deal of Mr. Penn, who consults him on every point that relates to literature in hiscountry. His letter laid before the Society entrusted with the moneys for the Germans, and they are satisfied that the education of youth ought to be their more immediate object. The management of this important trust should devolve upon men of the first rank of Pennyslvania and not upon clergy who depend on Dutch synods. Hopes to see all such dependence shaken off once they can supply the Germans with ministers from the Academy. Outline of the scheme which he has laid before the Society. Smelled out and broke the neck of Mr. Tennent's scheme, which was for the benefit of the Jersey College, by monopolizing the education of German clergy. His proposition of a German professor of divinity at the Academy to prevent this scheme of drawing the Pennsylvania Germans to the Jersey College. The Proprietor has agreed to give ten or twelve acres of land to every schoolmaster. Has drawn out a short memorial of the case of the Germans without any reasonings or education, which is to be distributed and collections solicited in both houses of Parliament. He doubts not the contributions will amount to a great sum, his Majestry having given £1,000 and the Princess Dowager £100. The Archbishop has greatly encouraged him. Col. Martin, of Antigua, if Mr. Smith returns, will send his youngest son to the Academy, and Mr. Penn talks of sending out a nephew. He (Smith) will return with a formed scheme and an appointement of trustees.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LXIX, 57. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 March 7A.L.S. 4p.LXIX, 57

London. Miscarriage of letters sent by Captain Mitchell. Increased interest of the Proprietor in the Academy. The gold medal from the Royal Society is being sent by [William] Smith. Disturbances in the Assemblies of Virginia and New york. Prof.[Peter] Kalm is publishing his American travels in Swedish. Further electrical experiments.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 24. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 March 17A.L.S. 4p.I, 24

Inner Temple. Has ventured to commit to paper certain thoughts on the subject of a Medium of Commerce including a plan of a provincial bank; explains his views. Favourable impression, his friend. Mr. Smith, created at Cambridge, Concerning the new model of the Administration, made necessary by Mr.Pelham's death, though the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Newcastle and most of the old friends of Sir Robert Walpole, hold together, yet they find it difficult to satisfy Mr. Fox, Secretary at War; Mr. Fox's powerful connections, said to extend even among the Royal Family; his refusing the office of Secretary of State; discovered it would curtail his powers in the House of Commons; rumor that he is to quit everything; Public Service cannot but suffer by this dissension.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: (See LII, 23.)

I, 25. Dalibard, Thomas-François, 1703-1799.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 March 31A.L.S. 3p.I, 25

Paris. Franklin's name justly reverenced in France by all, except a small number of electricians, like l'Abbe Nollet, who are jealous of his discoveries.  In French.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 193).

I, 26. Timothy, Peter.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 June 14A.L.S. 3p.I, 26

Charles Town. Acknowledging favor of Apr. 28th by Capt. Robeson which caused him great concern though its severity was probably marited; explains why he did not send the money. Sends $65 by Rudeman Robeson; thinks that will about balance his account. Can send no paper as yet. For 4 months has been the sole occupant of his printing-office, except a negro boy; discharged his villaionour apprentice, who might have been of vast service to him had he not been addicted to drink, play and scandalous company.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 27. Daniell, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 June 23A.L.S. 1p.I, 27

Kingston. Desirous of dealing with him for paper; asks for certain samples and prices.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 28. Daniell, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 June 29A.L.S. 1p.I, 28

Kingston. Since his last, has received Mr. Franklin's letter, telling him the paper has not arrived; will give more particular directions to the captain that carries them.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 21. Franklin, John, 1690-1756.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 September 2A.L.S. 1p.I, 21

Boston. Expected to hear complaints from Philadelphia of hot weather. Concerning Blanchard's Remedy for the Stone; thinks it might he service able in his disorder; means he has taken to procure some. Messages his wife sends. The enclosed is to be forwarded to Mr. Beacham's son, who is sick.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 30. Daniell, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1754 November 16A.L.S. 1p.I, 30

Kingston. Acknowledging the receipt of 10 reams of paper, and asking for fifty more, as he is really much in want.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LII, 23 (OS). Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
175411p.LII, 23 (OS)

Observations upon a medium of commerce. (See I, 24.)

General physical description: 11p.

XLII, 9. Kemble, Peter, 1704-1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1754]A.N.S. 1p.XLII, 9

New York. A request to forward an inclosure.

General physical description: A.N.S. 1p.

LVIII, 115. Unidentified.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1754]A.L. 4p.LVIII, 115

Schemes for uniting the strength of the Colonies; puts Mr. Davenant's published in 1698, ahead of all others; emphasizes its good points. (Final part missing.)

General physical description: A.L. 4p.

I, 33. Timothy, Peter.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 June 8A.L.S. 1p.I, 33

Charles Town. Acknowledging receipt of paper. Begs again for statement of his account. If his study of the Electrical Arcana, and public affairs leave him any leisure, begs for a line or two. Wretched management of Indian affairs by the Governor of South Carolina; effect on his press. Announces birth of 6th child and only son.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 34. Brooke, Richard, 1716-1783.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 June 27A.L.S. 4p.I, 34

Maryland. Thanking him for his hospitality during his visit to Philadelphia last year. A detailed account of the effects produced on Mrs. Addison's house in his neighborhood by a stroke of lightning at the end of last May. The noise awakened Mrs. Addison who observed two balls of fire in her room, about the size of a pigeon's egg, which soon went out and left for a considerable time afterward a strong sulphurous smell in the room. Asks numerous questions suggested by this incident.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 35 (OS). Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 June 28A.L.S. 2p.I, 35 (OS)

Philadelphia. Nothing worth communicating since the week before, except a paper published by Chattin, which has made a great stir; conjectures as to its author; if certain rumors are true, there is no occasion for sending him the enclosed copy. As requested, has shipped the paper to Jamaica. Holland hopes to finish the whole of the Almanack by the middle of August; has sent him vermilion and paper. Trusts his father may have no cause to regret leaving him the arrangement of the Post-office. Asks to have his name entered as subscriber for the second volume of Prince's Chronology.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XL, 54. Greene, Catharine Ray, 1731-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1755] June 28A.L.S. 1p.XL, 54

Block Island. Expressions of affection; sends him sugar-plums sweetened in the way he used to like.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 36. Daniell, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 July 4A.L.S. 1p.I, 36

Kingston. Asking to know how much paper he has received and what his indebtedness amounts to. Encloses some newspapers.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 37. Claus, Daniel, 1727-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 September 11A.L.S. 3p.I, 37

Lake George. Containing a detailed and graphic account of the expedition against Crown Point, led by Gen. Johnson [afterwards Sir William Johnson, Baronct], ending in the defeat of the French. Number of dead and wounded; Gen. Johnson wounded in the thigh; Baron de Dieskau brought in wounded; details a conversation he had with him; declared 600 Indians and 200 white had defeated Gen. Braddock. Hopes to go forward with utmost despatch.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 38. Shipley, William, 1715-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 September 13A.L.S. 3p.I, 38

London. Read with great pleasure Mr. Franklin's Plan for promoting Useful Knowledge among the British plantations in America. Introduces himself as Secretary of the Premium Society in London; invites Mr. Franklin to become one of their Correspondent Members; explains the purpose of the Society; fine results expected from this organization; encloses list of members (4 p.).

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 39. Shirley, William, 1694-1771.
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 September 17A.L.S. 1p.I, 39

Oswego. Acknowledging favors of the 1st and 4th inst. Concerning the payment due Franklin for engaging the wagons and horses for the use of the late Gen. Braddock's army; importance of that service; has written Gov. Morris to appoint three good men to liquidate and adjust those accounts. Greatly pressed for time; expects to move in a few days for Niagara.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 94).

I, 40. Hubbart, E..
to Benjamin Franklin
1755 December 1A.L.S. 3p.I, 40

Boston. Containing expressions of great affection and regard; likens him to one of the noble Romans; begs him to refrain from such an excess of goodness, otherwise he will occupy Heaven alone. Her father suffering much, though patiently, from his disorder; disappointed in the bill he hoped to send.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

LII, 25. Morris, Robert Hunter, 1713-1764.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 January 5D.S. 1p.LII, 25

Reading. Commission of Benjamin Franklin, giving him military authority over the county of Northampton.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

I, 41. Lloyd, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 January 31A.L.S. 3p.I, 41

Fort Allen at Gnadenhutten. Giving an account of a portion of their campaign; describes in detail the difficult journey from Bethlehem to Gnadenhutten [Ohio]; safe arrival there; engaged in building a fort; scenes of horror and destruction where lately flourished a peaceful village. Mr. William Franklin's justice, humanity and patience in dealing with the people. Defeat of a party who left Bethlehem on the same day they did. Hopes to come up with the enemy and convince them that Pennsylvania can defend their frontiers; for himself is determined to scalp all he lays his hands on, with unremitting rage.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 42. Hubbart, E..
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 February 16A.L.S. 2p.I, 42

Boston. Enclosing catalogue of her Papa's library; the books will not be sold until Mr. Franklin decides whether he wants any or all of them. He will see by the copy of her Papa's will that she has received five volumes; her father offered her the whole collection, but she refused, thinking that the estate could not afford such a legacy. Remits him $239 in prize-tickets to be credited to her account. Also sends two specimens of sand thrown up by the late earth-quake.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LII, 25.5 (OS). Morris, Robert Hunter, 1713-1764.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 February 24D.S. 2p.LII, 25.5 (OS)

Philadelphia. Commission of Benjamin Franklin as colonel of the regiment of the city of Philadelphia. A.E. that on February 28, 1756, Benjamin Franklin took the prescribed oath before Richard Peters, Secretary.

General physical description: D.S. 2p.

Mss.B.F85.di. College of William and Mary.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 April 2D.S. 1p.LH-MV-C-8

Diploma of master of arts.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

LII, 27 (OS). Norfolk (Va.). Mayor.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 April 10D.S. 1p.LII, 27 (OS)

Certificate that on that day the freedom of the Borough of Norfolk was conferred on Benjamin Franklin. Signed: Rich[ar]d Kelsick, Mayor.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

LXIX, 64. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 April 25A.L.S. 4p.LXIX, 64

London. Electrical papers at last came to hand and are now on press under the inspection and direction of Dr. Fothergill, for they thought it a great pity that the public should be deprived of the benefit of so many curious experiments. The papers communicated to the [Royal] Society, which was greatly pleased with them. Abbe Nollet has traveled to Turin, Venice and Bologna to see certain experiments verified, but the ingenious men of those cities had been too premature in publishing for facts experiments that could not be depended on to succeed, to his no small disappointment. Is obliged to him for the Constitutions. Have had the warmest winter and spring that ever was known. It may have furnished materials for earthquakes of February and March. Speculations thereon.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 43. Charles, Robert.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 August 12A.L.S. 2p.I, 43

London. Acknowledging Mr. Franklin's letter of 4th ult.; will endeavor to make the best use of the seasonable intelligence therein contained. Proofs of zeal given by the Assembly of Pennsylvania; injustice of certain imputations. Asks for a statement of certain accounts in Pennsylvania since the commencement of the present troubles, that the colony may receive proper considertaion when the matter comes before Parliament. Gov. Morris has at last communicated his instructions; cannot say what will be thought at the claim; hopes the Assembly will not be divested of a privilege. Sorry for the unhappy state of affairs in Europe; greatly concerned at news of the military reinforcements sent from France into North America.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 44. Shipley, William, 1715-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 September 1A.L.S. 2p.I, 44

London. His election as corresponding member of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts. Their desire to make Great Britain and her colonies mutually serviceable. The advantage to the mother country of giving premiums in America. Thanks him for his generous present of 20 guineas.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 124, Note).

I, 46. Peters, Richard, 1743-1828.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 December 24A.L.S. 1p.I, 46

(Memorandum.) Colonel Bouquet waited on the Governor in the presence of the Mayor and demanded that certain supplies and good quarters be provided for the reminder of the 1100 men and 51 officers before January 1. (Attested copy.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 47. Ourry, Lewis, 1717-1779.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 December 26A.L.S. 1p.I, 47

Philadelphia. After visiting the quarters of the First Battalion of the Royal American Regiment, reports lack of bedding and covering; no quarters fit for officers nor any provided for recruits.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXVI, 9. Mecom, Benjamin.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756 December 27D.S. 1p.LXVI, 9

Philadelphia. Bond for £50.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

Access digital object:
http://diglib.amphilsoc.org/islandora/object/text:140074

XLIV, 91. Partridge, Elizabeth Hubbart, 1728-1814.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1756 December]L. 3p.XLIV, 91

An account of the courtship and marriage of Mr. Hubbard in his eighty-first year (our Speaker's father). (Thomas Hubbard, Speaker of the Massachusetts House, 1750-1758.)

General physical description: L. 3p.

LVIII, 117. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1756L. 3p.LVIII, 117

Difficulty in inducing the Governor to grant commissions to certain men in Philadelphia chosen to act as military officers in their respective wards; the Governor hanged in effigy.  (Several pages missing.)

General physical description: L. 3p.

I, 48. Waring, John, 1716-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
1757 January 24A.L.S. 3p.I, 48

London. Announcing the death of a worthy clergyman, Mr. Henry Wheatley, whose executor he is; in his will, appointed Mr. Franklin trustee for his heirs; if, however, these legatees be dead the money is to revert to the residuary legatee. Is a member of an association for the conversion of the negroes on the plantation to Christianity; asks his advice and assistance in this matter.  (Parts missing.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

LVIII, 1. Pennsylvania. General Assembly.
to Benjamin Franklin
1757 March 31D. 1p.LVIII, 1

Instructions to Benjamin Franklin, as one of the Commissioners for the Province in England.  (Incomplete.)

General physical description: D. 1p.

I, 49. Duché, Jacob, 1738-1798.
to Benjamin Franklin
1757 May 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 49

Philadelphia. Begs him to take charge of the enclosed letters which are directed to gentlemen with whom he [Franklin] is personally acquainted; wishes him the highest success in his laudable undertakings.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 99. Unidentified.
to Benjamin Franklin
1757 May 10A.L. 2p.LVIII, 99

Philadelphia. Desires this letter containing a minute account of a new clock he has invented laid before the Royal Society of London.  (Final part missing.)

General physical description: A.L. 2p.

I, 50. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1757 October 17A.L.S. 6p.I, 50

Philadelphia. Pleased to hear of his safe arrival, by a letter from Exeter. Concerning Indian affairs; proprietary purchases; conduct of certain gentlemen at the last Treaty of Easton; Geo. Croghan their tool; minutes tampered with; thinks the deed of 1718 was suppressed during the conferences. Indians exasperated; Delawares acting openly against the Mohawks and those they apprehend to be their oppressors in Pennsylvania. Sales of land made by John Penn about the year 1734; dispute over titles. Late elections. New Castle Convention likely to meet during the year. The House dissatisifed with Richard Partridge [Agent at Court for New Jersey]. No word from Gen. Stanwix since his election.

General physical description: A.L.S. 6p.

XL, 2. Hunter, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1757 November 30]A.L.S. 1p.XL, 2

Desiring drafts for three or four hundred pounds on Franklin's banker. His sister wants one of twenty pounds for marketing.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 98. Unidentified.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1757]L. 2p.LVIII, 98

Acknowledging Franklin's excellent Observations on the Increase of Mankind. Some observations on the influence manners have always had on the numbers of a people and their political prosperity.  (Final part missing.)

General physical description: L. 2p.

I, 51. Gordon, Alexander.
to Benjamin Franklin
1758 March 15A.L.S. 1p.I, 51

Portsmouth. Left London on the 5th inst., was taken ill of a fever on the road and has been ill ever since; his pitiable condition without money or friends; must go to jail unless he can pay the physician, apothecary and landlord; aware that Mr. Franklin was once well acquainted with his father; begs for a small sum, for which he will give his bill upon his father. Was clerk on the ship "Vulture"; if he recovers hopes to get another berth.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXXVI, 1 (OS). Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1758 April 24A.D.S. 8p.LXXVI, 1 (OS)

Opinion as to alteration of the charter of the Province of Pennsylvania and the power of the Crown, in connection therewith, in case of surrender of the powers of government by the Proprietary.

General physical description: A.D.S. 8p.

LVIII, 31. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1758 June 16L.S. 2p.LVIII, 31

Philadelphia. Trade restrictions. Pitt's appointment is disheartening to the Proprietary party. Military affairs.  (Incomplete.)

General physical description: L.S. 2p.

I, 51.5. Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1758 September 3A.L.S. 2p.I, 51.5

Tunbridge Wells. Acknowledging favor of 30th ult. In a fortnight will set out with Mr. Jackson on their Norfolk tour. Thanks him for his care in supplying him with money as well as for other proofs of paternal affection. Mr. Hunter's fondness for Tunbridge Wells increases with the growth of his acquaintance. His father's letter with the agreeable news of the King of Prussia's having defeated the Russians was very acceptable; contained some particulars not yet known.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 52. Colden, David, 1733-1784.
to Benjamin Franklin
1758 October 26A.L.S. 2p.I, 52

Coldengham. Sends by his cousin, Alexander Colden, a copy of a paper, written by himself explaining the phenomena of electricity; prevented from sending it before; had Mr. Franklin not been absent from America, these papers would have been much more correct; unwilling to have it appear in print without his approbation; begs him to make any corrections he may think fit.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LXIX, 94. England, Allen. England, Joseph.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1758]L. in 3d P. 3p.LXIX, 94

Asking what steps are necessary to revoke the power of attorney for the management of their estate in the County of Newcastle, granted to Israel Pemberton.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 3p.

XL, 1. Garrigues, Rebecca Haydock.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1758]A.L.S. 1p.XL, 1

Philadelphia. Concerning a piece of silk which must be manufactured to match her pattern.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXVIII, 72. Pringle, John, Sir, 1707-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1758]A.L.S. 2p.LXVIII, 72

Asks Dr. Franklin's assistance in treating a lady patient with electricity.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Mss.B.F85.di. University of St. Andrews.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 February 12D.S. 1p.LH-MV-C-8

St. Andrews. Doctor of Laws Diploma; also contemporary copy with translation of same.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

I, 53. Wilson, Benjamin, 1721-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 April 8A.L.S. 1p.I, 53

London. Concerning an experiment of Mr. Colden's in electricity; reasons for not thinking it either surprising or curious. Will satisfy him of the fact by an experiment or two when next they meet.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 54. Musschenbroek, Petrus von, 1692-1761.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 April 15A.L.S. 2p.I, 54

Leyden. Concerning various writers on electricity than which none excel Franklin in the explanation of certain mysterics; urges him to fresh experiments. The writer's interest in life is to promote physical and natural science; thinks they might gain mutual advantage from a correspondence. [In Latin.]

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Originally included an enclosure, List of Books, [1759]; XLIX, 43. Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 186, Note).

I, 55. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 July 31A.L.S. 4p.I, 55

Fairhill near Philadelphia. On the 14th ult. received an order from the Commissioners for some public money to discharge agents' salaries, also a supply for Franklin. Encloses copies of Five important papers, the first four concerning the Remitting Act, and the fifth, a speech of Gov. Denny's concerning the act for recording warrants and surverys; hopes Mr. Franklin will use his best endeavors to get them confirmed in England, the influence this may have in settling their differences with Proprietaries. Assures him that no person whatever had or could take a copy of a paragraph in a former letter of his relating to the Proprictaries.  [Copy]

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 57. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 August 11A.L.S. 1p.I, 57

Fairhill. Acknowledging letter of June 9th. Uncertain when this letter will leave, so wishes merely to acknowledge his kindness in looking after his money. Successful expeditions everywhere against the French; Niagara, Ticonderoga and Crown Point being reduced, thinks the same results may be expected at Quebec; the French intimidated by such rapid conquests. Sends affectionate remembrances to Billy.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 56. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 August 224p.I, 56

Fairhill. Enclosing Nos.1, 2, and 3. No. I, copy I, 55, with additional postscript, dated Aug. 5th, announcing the reduction of Niagara and Ticonderoga; forces bombarding Quebec. No. 2, copy of letter 1, 57. No. 3, dated Aug. 22, 1759. Sent these letters before but the ship sprung a leak and returned to port, will forward them by Capt. Hamet, who is to sail the next day. Thanks him for the care he has taken on his account in money matters; the situation of the public money.  [Incomplete.]  [Copy.]

General physical description: 4p.

Mss.B.F85.di. Edinburgh (Scotland). City Council.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 September 5D.S. 1p.LH-MV-C-8

Edinburgh. Certificate of admission as Burges and Gild brother of Edinburgh.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

Mss.B.F85.di. University of St. Andrews.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 October 2D.S. 1p.LH-MV-C-8

Certificate of admission. In Latin. Signed: Patrick Wilson

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

XLII, 31. Dick, Janet.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1759] October 12N. in 3d P. 1p.XLII, 31

Prestonfield, England. Sends an empty purse. Expresses hopes for a good journey and happy return to his family.

General physical description: N. in 3d P. 1p.

LXXVIII, 53. Williamson, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1759 OctoberA.L.S. 1p.LXXVIII, 53

Fragment. Extolling an innocent way of thinking and living. That is, innocence towards men and animals. End of letter only.

LVIII, 100. Callender, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1759-1760]Dr. of L. 3p.LVIII, 100

Quotations from the letters of Benjamin Franklin, Isaac Norris and William Callender concerning the state of affairs in the province of Pennsylvania; dispute over the passage of a bill to insure a state militia; bill for conciliating the Indians and holding them to the English interests; antagonistic attitude of the Governor.  (First part missing.)

General physical description: Dr. of L. 3p.

I, 58. Waring, John, 1716-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
1760 January 4A.L.S. 1p.I, 58

London. Informing him that the Associates of the late Dr. Bray have unanimously elected him a member of their Society; they have resolved upon opening three schools for negroes with all convenient speed; requests his attendance at a meeting to be held at Mr. Bird's on the 17th.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLI, 106. Sargent, John, 1715-1791.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760] June 19A.L.S. 1p.XLI, 106

Will be glad to see Franklin at all times. Bewails the capture of Quebec.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 59. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1760 September 26A.L.S. 3p.I, 59

Philadelphia. Acknowledging various letters received in June and July. Concerning a bill sent up to the Governor, to enable the agents to receive monies, which have been or may be allotted to this Province upon the Parliamentary grants. Stormy state of affairs; everything in the present crisis depends on Franklin; if only the principal Acts he confirmed, their future controversies with the Proprietaries will be made more easy. Encloses copy of the aforementioned bill with the Governor's amendment.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 204).

I, 60. Thomson, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1760 November 18A.L.S. 1p.I, 60

Worcester. Pleasure Mr. Franklin's short stay in Worcester afforded him. Thanks him for the entertainment he is confident he owes to him, after reading "The Interest of Great Britain with respect to her Colonies"; hopes it will be taken to heart by those who are intrusted with the property, liberty and life of a people.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXVIII, 52. Strahan, William (1715-1785).
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760] December 271 p.LXVIII, 52

Reproaching Franklin (gently) for not calling in New Street to see his wife. Is afraid he will, at least, do himself no good by feasting every day, and wishes him to come soon and have one "meagre day" in New Street.

XLII, 40. Taunton, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760] December 29A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 40

London. Thanks for favors received.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLII, 12. Taunton, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760]A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 12

London. Appeal for assistance. See also: LXIX, 89

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLII, 38. Taunton, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760]A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 38

London. Account of his health during the past winter.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXIX, 89. Taunton, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1760]A.L.S. 1p.LXIX, 89

London. Appeal for assistance. See also: XLII, 12

XLIII, 157. Chambers, Mr..
to Benjamin Franklin
[1761 April]L. in 3d P. 1p.XLIII, 157

[London]. Disappointed at not meeting Franklin at the Philadelphia Coffee House. Requests him to send letters for him, by bearer, as he is going to set out for Portsmouth next morning.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 1p.

I, 61. Potts, Henry.
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 May 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 61

London. Read the letter left by him to Lord Bossborough, who ordered him to acquaint Mr. Franklin that he desired Mackrath might be removed directly and the person recommended by Gov. Littleton appointed postmaster at Charlestown.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Access digital object:
https://diglib.amphilsoc.org/islandora/object/text:255070

I, 62. Wilmot, John Eardley, Sir, 1709-1792.
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 May 8A.L.S. 1p.I, 62

Gray's Inn, London. Informed by Mr. Penn that the £100,000 Act passed by Mr. Hamilton, has been transmitted to Franklin under seal, with the intention, he presumes, of presenting it to the Council; begs for a quarter of an hour's conversation with him before that Act is presented; has something material to say to him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 63. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 August 19A.L.S. 2p.I, 63

Fairhill. Acknowledging favors of May 9th and June 13th; well pleased with additional purchase of stock on account of the Province. The Parliamentary grant for 1759 apportioned by the Lords of the Treasury; presumes the House will impower some persons to receive it; hopes it will be appropriated to the lessening of the taxes and sinking the Bills of Credit. Hopes the address of the Assembly sent over at the accession of his present Majesty may have escaped the enemy. Concerning a letter of credit to Col. Lloyd. Bills of exchange sent by him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 64. Ronayne, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 August 26A.L.S. 2p.I, 64

Cork. Communicates a few experiments and observations on electricity and desires to have Franklin's opinion of them. Certain queries concerning thunder [answered in red ink on opposite page of manuscript by Dr. Franklin].

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 65. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 September 30A.L.S. 4p.I, 65

Fairhill. Acknowledging favor of July 10th, which was read in the House; members all satisfied with the succinct account therein contained of the situation of the public money under Franklin's care; House decided to draw bills of exchange on him for the net proceeds of the First Parliamentary Grant; appointment of certain persons to receive these and other monies. Three bills of exchange sent. Certain discoveries concerning practical surveying.—Oct. 19th. His letter of Sept.30th missed the packet. Since then received Franklin's favor of Aug. 7th. Concerning the settlement of certain accounts. Reasons for Assembly's decision to draw bills of exchange for the First Parliamentary Grant. Robert Charles's refusal of the agency of Pennsylvania; matters connected with this. Some investments he would like Franklin to make for him. (Duplicate.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LXIX, 66. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1761] October 17A.L.S. 1p.LXIX, 66

Mill Hill. Expresses pleasure on Mr. Franklin's safe arrival [from the Continent] in the happy land of liberty, and hopes to see him soon. There is a new large coach on springs that comes every day from the Bull Inn in Holborn.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXVIII, 14. Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce (Great Britain).
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 and 1762Printed N.S. 1p.LXVIII, 14

Notice of meeting of committees.

General physical description: Printed N.S. 1p.

LXVIII, 15. Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce (Great Britain).
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 and 1762Printed N.S. 1p.LXVIII, 15

Notice of meeting of committees.

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LXVIII, 16. Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce (Great Britain).
to Benjamin Franklin
1761 and 1762Printed N.S. 1p.LXVIII, 16

Notice of meeting of committees.

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I, 66. Dalibard, Thomas-François, 1703-1799.
to Benjamin Franklin
1762 FebruaryA.L.S. 4p.I, 66

Paris. Acknowledging favor of December 9, 1761, by Dr. Shippen. Their correspondence interrupted for many years by the war; delayed answering his letters in hopes of hearing some new discovery in electricity that he might impart; since the last edition of Dr. Franklin's works, has given up all electrical experiments; gives four reasons why; M.Le Roy of the Royal Academy of Sciences has long upheld Franklin's theory of electricity against M. I'Abbe Nollet. Defense of the latter's theory by M.Dutour. Recalls the letters printed in 1753 by I'Abbe Nollet in opposition to Franklin's. Delighted with Dr. Shippen; politeness he has shown him. M. de Buffon begs him to ask Mr. Collinson to send him seeds of trees in Pennsylvania for the Jardin des Plantes; suggests applying to John Battram. [Here manuscript is badly mutilated.] Begs him not to leave Europe without a visit to Paris; offers to get him passports.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 67. Hippisley, R. (Richard).
to Benjamin Franklin
1762 April 19A.L.S. 1p.I, 67

Begs Franklin, as an encourager of the arts and sciences, to subscribe to his work, entitled "An Analysis of Oratory."

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 68. Hume, David, 1711-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1762 May 10A.L.S. 3p.I, 68

Edinburgh. Acknowledging Mr. Franklin's goodness in sending him an exact description of the method of preserving houses from thunder; communicated it to their Philosophical Society; Mr. Russel read a paper on it; repeats two suggestions he made. Sent his letter to Lord Mareschal; his Lordship busy settling the controversy about the eternity of hell-torments which has upset the little kingdom of Neuf-Chatel. Synod of divines making themselves ridiculous. Franklin the first great man of letters sent them America, loth to let him go. Sir Alexander Dick desires his compliments sent.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 243; Bigelow, III, 189; Smyth, IV, 153).

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I, 69. Sargent, Aufrere, and Company.
to Benjamin Franklin
1762 August 12L.S. 1p.I, 69

London. Sends him two gold medals to be applied, as a mark of their good wishes, to Franklin's College. Enclose letter of credit.

General physical description: L.S. 1p.

I, 70. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1762 October 21A.L.S. 2p.I, 70

London. Impatiently awaiting news of Franklin's safe arrival; his friends regret his absence but hope to enjoy his correspondence and share in his discoveries. Mr. Fox extremely obliged to Dr. Franklin for his letter; this draws a similar request from Mr. Hamilton. Congratulates him on his son's promotion; thinks he has a sensible and agreeable wife. Account of certain monies enclosed.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XLIII, 175. Fitzgerald, Keane. Morton, Charles, 1716-1799.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1762]L. in 3d P. 1p.XLIII, 175

London. Will call on Dr. Franklin, Friday evening, with two ladies.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 1p.

XLII, 15. Garrigues, Isaac.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1762]A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 15

London. Asks for particulars concerning the late Mr.[James] Ralph.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LXXVIII, 48. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1762-1764]A.L. 2p.LXXVIII, 48

Fragment. Concerns Sir William Johnson and Indian affairs. Freeman guide #1489.

Other Descriptive Information: See also: Franklin to Jackson, 8 March 1763, Franklin-Jackson Collection (Mss.B.F85.j)

I, 71. Mills, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 March 2A.L.S. 1p.I, 71

London. Begging his acceptance of the first volume of his "Husbandry."

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 72. Whitehurst, John, 1713-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 March 18A.L.S. 3p.I, 72

Derby. Congratulates him on the appointment of his son to the Governorship of New Jersey. The bearer, Mr. Tunnicliff, is a neighbor of his and a farmer; he desires to purchase two or three thousand acres in America and bring over his family; hopes Mr. Franklin will give him any assistance or advice in his power. Parliament in possession of Mr. Harrison's improvement for measuring equal time at sea; thinks he will receive a handsome reward; the King has ordered this improvement to be made known to all foreign ministers. The King's policy all for the general good and benefit of his subjects. Concerning a "General Theory of the Earth," which he will send him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 73. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 April 4A.L.S. 4p.I, 73

Glad to hear of his safe arrival. Has been chosen to Parliament for Weymouth. Expects to complete his work during the summer. The Speaker frequently inquires after Franklin. Can get no satisfactory information about Mr. Barker or his family; if the heir was in the East India service, can easily procure intelligence of him. Not surprised at the joy universally expressed on Mr. Franklin's arrival in Philadelphia. His letter, containing an account of Madeira, most welcome, he being one of the committee to inquire into its state. Concerning the Act of Assembly received from Mr. Moore.—Question of certain monies allowed Pennsylvania by the Treasury for her defence in 1760 and 1761.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 249).

I, 74. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 April 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 74

London. Expressing his own and his family's great satisfaction at the news of Franklin's safe arrival.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 49. Pringle, John, Sir, 1707-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1763 May]A.L. 2p.LVIII, 49

[London]. Reasons why Franklin should return to England. Put into Lord Bute's hands Franklin's proposals as to the preservation of gun-powder, as well as the best means for securing the health of the garrison at Senegal. Shells for Lady Bute. Meetings at his house Sunday evenings. Will send Franklin's account of the paper currency to Lord Shelburne. Dr. Watson's cure of tetanus by electricity.  (Mutilated.)

General physical description: A.L. 2p.

I, 75. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 June 8A.L.S. 5p.I, 75

London. Sends box by Captain Friend in the Carolina; in it are books and catalogues for The Library Company, some for J. Bartram and the History of Florida for Franklin. He and Franklin both fortunate in their family connections. Encloses receipt for box of books and one for box of seeds. P. S. From a New York newspaper, see a new colony called New Wales is to be settled on the Ohio; asks him to forward any work relating to this expedition.

General physical description: A.L.S. 5p.

I, 75.5. Armbruster, Anthony.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 June 13A.L.S. 1p.I, 75.5

Philadelphia. Urged by the greatest necessity, or else would not trouble him. Begs Mr. Franklin to send orders to procure him that sum he gave him hopes of, before commencing his journey; his distress very great and if Mr. F. does not rescue him, he will be a great sufferer in his business.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 76. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 June 28A.L.S. 1p.I, 76

London. Acknowledging letter, with inclosure to be forwarded to Mr. Hamilton. Mentions box of books again, its contents, etc. Mr. Edwards has published 7th volume of 'Birds and Animals, etc.'; if The Library Co. want to complete their set, let them send in time.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 50. Small, Alexander, 1710-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 July 5A.L.S. 4p.LVIII, 50

London. Sending him six pounds of burnet seeds and explaining its manifold advantages. Promises him the seeds of an uncommonly good cabbage, which grows in Anjou. Description of the new hemp machine. (Final part missing.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 77. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 August 23A.L.S. 4p.I, 77

London. Entertainment given to Pennsylvania's new Governor [John Penn]; to judge by appearance, he lacks striking abilities, he''ll be the easier governed by his uncle; Proprietor Thomas was there and anxious to Know if Mr. Franklin was coming over to solicit a revival of Dr. Coxe's grant for lands on the Mississippi. Loss of Lord Egremont, hopes they may be as happy in the new appointment. Concerned at the new rupture with the Indians, reasons for it. Mr. Canton thinks he is forgotten. Mr. clark, chaplain to the Earl of Bristol, has published a modern history of Spain. Their friend Hamilton sends thanks for instructions and hopes Franklin will be tempted over soon.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 78 (OS). Engs, Samuel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 September 3A.L.S. 2p.I, 78 (OS)

London. Recalls meeting Mr. Franklin at the house of his worthy partner, Mr. Collins, of Rhode Island. Larely arrived from England, but finds climate in Virginia so disagreeable, has decided to go to Philadelphia. Compliments Franklin on his discoveries, experiments and signal services. Having occasion for a trifle of cash, took the liberty to draw on Mr. Franklin for a small amount for travelling expenses to Philadelphia; will remit the money as soon as he arrives in that city.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 79. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 September 9A.L.S. 1p.I, 79

London. Acknowledging his letters from Boston. The enclosed were drawn up at the breaking out of the Cherokee War; a few hints drawn from them might have prevented these cruel recent depredations. News just arrived of their defeat, much concern felt.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 80. Bowdoin, James, 1726-1790.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 September 20A.L.S. 1p.I, 80

Roxbury. Thanking him for his communication of the 19th inst. Quotes a request [in Latin] by Father Beccaria. Congratulates him upon the honors conferred on him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 81. Jones, Griffith, 1722-1786.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 October 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 81

London. Though Mr. Cumming's letter will inform him of the motive, which induced the friends of the bearer to send him to Philadelphia, yet, as the father of the boy, desired to state his reasons for the step. The lad has been carefully brought up; has been an apprentice for two years, but had too much liberty to go out after the business of the day was over; afraid of his being led into irregularities and extravagances, so, by Mr. Cumming's advice, decided to send him abroad; hopes Mr. Franklin will be so good as to accept him for the remainder of his time; sets forth his attainments; asks that he may be kept closely at work.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 81.5. Cumming, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 October 7A.L.S. 4p.I, 81.5

London. Sends this letter by Capt. Stout. Already greatly in Mr. Franklin's debt, but intends to contract a fresh one; Mr. Griffith Jones, a printer in fleet St., has already written about this matter [I, 81]; advised him to send his son abroad; thought first naturally of Franklin; why he thinks it wiser for him to pay for the boy's passage; hopes the lad will be under the supervision of David Hall; trusts he will make a man like his father. Lord Shelburne's interest in Franklin; on his being appointed Lord of 'I'rade, desired any information Franklin could impart, relative to the public good of his Province; since then a turbulent routish faction occasioned his resignation; he is still the King's favorite and must always have interest everywhere; advises Franklin to write to him and to ignore his resignation. Messages to his wife, son and daughter,— is the last-named married?

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 82. Sargent, John, 1715-1791.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 November 8A.L.S. 4p.I, 82

London. Has not had a line from him since his letter of Aug. 8th. His son brought home ill from Eton, but all that is happily over. Lord Egmont's preferment and Lord Hyde's appointment in his place; will carry out his wishes with the latter if possible. Party feeling running high. The Ministry sure to carry their point in Parliament regarding Wilkes; the result in Westminster Hall less certain. Concerning money matters. His interest in Franklin's son, now Governor of New Jersey. Messages from various friends.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 83. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 November 12A.L.S. 7p.I, 83

London. Greatly concerned to hear of Franklin's misfortune but hopes by this time the cure is perfectly effected. Concerning some business connected with a grant which he is negotiating for Dr. Franklin with the Messrs. Coxe; search for original draught. Parliament meets on Tuesday, Mr. Wiles' business will come up then; House of Commons will probably express resentment at the use he has made of their privilege; session likely to be one of great heat and animosity; fears something relative to America will be done, very much against his opinion. Question of duty on molasses; will oppose all inland duties laid by Parliament on the colonies. Province of Pennsylvania excluded from all share of the money granted by Parliament for the service of 1761; fears this is not the only ill office the General has done the Province. Mr.Penn on his (Jackson's) side in this matter.

General physical description: A.L.S. 7p.

LXIX, 75. Levy, Levi Andrew.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1763] November 121 p.LXIX, 75

Asks Franklin to answer some "inclosed requisitions" [lacking].

LXVI, 10. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 November 15D.S. 2p.LXVI, 10

Bond for £178, 18s. given to Benjamin Franklin. Endorsement by the latter.

General physical description: D.S. 2p.

I, 84. Brown, Henton.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 November 26A.L.S. 3p.I, 84

London. Acknowledging the receipt of several letters and transmitting a statement of their account with Mr. Franklin. Asks him to recommend them to Richard Jackson, Esq., as bankers for the Province of Pennsylvania to which he is agent. Various failures; fall of stocks. Unsettled state of the Ministry. Question relative to Wilkes; majority in the House; duel fought between him and Sam Martin, late of the Treasury; Wilkes wounded in the body, but not fatally; the paper is voted to be burnt by the hands of the common hangman; and 'tis thought the author will be expelled.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 85. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1763 December 27A.L.S. 8p.I, 85

London. Has had only one letter from him in a great while; hopes he is effectually cured; with such news, could make one thousand people happy. Lord Hyde to take Lord Egmont's place, Lord Halifax has now the administration of American affairs; this mutability no proof of an unstable Ministry. Has a good deal of access to Mr. Grenville, who is at the head of it. American affairs in a critical situation. Thinks Maj. Barker at Manila is the gentleman sought after by Franklin; expects him in England in February on March. Difficulty of the work connected with Messrs. Coxe's application; various other claims to the land. His opinion that the mother country is mistress of the trade of its colonies, that she may prohibit foreign trade and may therefore tax; dreads internal taxes. Messages to Mr. Galloway. Mr. Allen's stand on behalf of the Province. Discusses Indian war. Agrees with Franklin about a plethora of money. People's estimate of Col. Bouquet. Encloses list of Acts sent him by the Agent for the Proprietors. Dr. Pringle's reasons for declining any concern in their scheme.

General physical description: A.L.S. 8p.

LVIII, 114 (OS). Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1763]2p.LVIII, 114 (OS)

Mr. Coxe's claim; project for a settlement on the Mississippi. Paper currency. (Fragment.)

General physical description: 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: See: William and Mary Quarterly, vol. 4, no. 4, 538

XLII, 16. Greene, Catharine Ray, 1731-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 January 13A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 16

Misfortunes of Dr. Franklin's sister. Family affairs.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 86. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 January 26A.L.S. 3p.I, 86

Inner Temple. Has written him by every packet. Maj. Barker's arrival in England, his intention to sail for America in April, then to take possession of and cultivate his estate; has recommended him to certain friends in America. Several American questions coming before Parliament; constantly occupied comhating dangerous errors in American politics; results not commensurate with his efforts. Has long since given up hope of preventing some Parliamentary tax on North America for the maintenance of troops kept there; his aversion to internal taxes. Customs and prohibitions in trade date from the Long Parliament; wishes this to be the rule of England's conduct on this occasion. A bill in embryo for restraining the paper currency of North America within certain limits; will undoubtedly be carried.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 87. Price, George.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 March 7A.L.S. 4p.I, 87

Fort Prince George. Thanking him for the flattering letter he wrote on his behalf to Messrs. Timothy and Limpirc. Describes the situation of Fort Prince George and its means of defense; it has been besieged more than once and almost starved into surrender before succor arrived. Number of Indians in the vicinity; two thousand warriors in the Cherokee Nation who desire peace; also anxious to aid in any movement against the Creeks,who number three or four thousand fighting men. A report that the Creeks have refused to give up the late murderers as demanded by the Governor; more mischief expected from that quarter.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 88. Moffatt, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 May 12A.L.S. 2p.I, 88

Newport, Rhode Island. Acknowledging favor of 9th ult. Highest degree of heat and cold at Newport, curious about the same in Philadelphia. Causes which produce Yellow or bilious fever. His views as to their College. Agitated by imperfect rumors from England about their Charter.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 89. Canton, John, 1718-1772.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 June 29A.L.S. 3p.I, 89

London. Acknowledging favor of March 14th. Mr. Kinnersley's first experiment in electricity truly a beautiful one; what it proves; his second experiment an extraordinary one; has endeavored in vain to make it in England. Mr. Bowdoin's telescope in Mr. Nairne's hands, who is making a pedestal for it. Describes certain experiments he has made, showing the difference in the compressibility of water, in winter and summer. Other members of the Club send their compliments.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 256).

I, 90. Mills, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 July 12A.L.S. 1p.I, 90

London. Acknowledging his favor of March 10 by Mr. Shadwell. Thanks him for presenting to Col. Elliot the first volume of his 'Husbandry' ; requests his acceptance of the rest of that work as a mark of esteem for the memory of his father, Dr. Elliot. Delay in getting the remaining volumes. Sends the fourth volume to Franklin. Greatly obliged for list of American book sellers; will make use of it when the fifth and last volume is completed. Various American seeds he is sending to the Society of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences at Rennes.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 101. Unidentified.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 8L. 1p.LVIII, 101

Philadelphia. Interested in reading Dr. Pringle's account of the meteor; efforts he has made to obtain an accurate account of the one which appeared in Philadelphia on the 20th of July, 1764.  Mutilated.

General physical description: L. 1p.

I, 91. Becket, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 10A.L.S. 2p.I, 91

London. Acknowledging favor of June 17th; confesses that Franklin's resentment against him is just; reasons for his delay in sending certain promised articles; assures him it will not happen again. Sends him two packets of reviews, magazines and four pamphlets.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 92. Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 10A.L.S. 2 p.I, 92

Carlisle. Desertion has reduced his two battalions to about 750 men; cannot spare so many from his small force; is therefore obliged to apply to the Governor and Commissioners for money to recruit the number lost; begs him to use all his influence with the Board to obtain this favor speedily. Situation quiet, neither disturbed by their active enemy, nor assisted by their indolent frontier friends.  In duplicate. (See I, 93)

General physical description: A.L.S. 2 p.

I, 93. Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 10A.L.S. 2 p.I, 93

Carlisle. Desertion has reduced his two battalions to about 750 men; cannot spare so many from his small force; is therefore obliged to apply to the Governor and Commissioners for money to recruit the number lost; begs him to use all his influence with the Board to obtain this favor speedily. Situation quiet, neither disturbed by their active enemy, nor assisted by their indolent frontier friends.  In duplicate. (See I, 92)

LXXVIII, 47 (OS). Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 11A.L.S. 1p.LXXVIII, 47 (OS)

Fragment. There are hopes that sugar will grow to the south of St. Augustine and above Pensacola.

Other Descriptive Information: See Van Doren, Letters and papers of Benjamin Franklin and Richard Jackson, 173.

I, 94. Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 22A.L.S. 3p.I, 94

Fort Loudoun. Expressing his gratitude to Franklin and his sincere affection for him. Sorry to hear his sentiments concerning the government have raised him up enemies; wishes the unhappy disputes in the province might be amicably adjusted. Points out certain errors in the Government. Ministry appear averse to Proprietary governments. Board of Trade has just overset the fine superstructure raised by Lord Egmont, upon the expectation of a grant for the Island of St. John; sends his plan which is much approved of in England. Perused with pleasure the papers Mr. Franklin sent him; wishes the plan of a military frontier could be put in execution. Expects no disturbance until the Ohio is crossed.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 95. Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 22A.L.S. 3p.I, 95

Fort Loudoun. Acknowledging favor of 16th inst. with the welcome account that his request to the Governor had been granted; grateful for Franklin's warm support. Recapitulates various times when Franklin has promoted the service, rendering timely aid to Gen. Shirley, Gen. Braddock, Lord Loudoun and finally to himself in the execution of the present Act.  In duplicate.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 262).

I, 96. Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 August 27A.L.S. 1p.I, 96

Fort Loudoun. Has the mortification to inform him privately that Bradstreet has granted peace at Presqu' Isle to the Delaware and Shawancsc, without visiting on the least satisfaction for their murders and insults; intends taking no notice of this, but will proceed to the Ohio prepared to treat as enemies every villain of those nations, unless contrary orders come from the General.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 97. Moffatt, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 September 24A.L.S. 1p.I, 97

Newport, Rhode Island. Thanks him for sending Dr. Heberden's method of inoculating the small-pox, which bears every mark of judgment, candor and benevolence; attention shown to this treatise in New England. At the anniversary meeting of their University, mentions various elections made, to show the progress of learning.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LII, 46 (OS). Pennsylvania. Provincial Assembly.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 October 26D.S. 1p.LII, 46 (OS)

Appointment of Benjamin Franklin as agent to Great Britain to assist Rich[ar]d Jackson. Signed: Cha[rle]s Moore, Clerk.

General physical description: D.S. 1p.

I, 98. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 October 27A.L.S. 3p.I, 98

Woodbridge, New Jersey. Acknowledging favors of 20th and 25th inst. Concerning certain debts he owes to Mr. Strahan and Mr. Franklin; discusses ways and means of paying them off. Business of the post-office. Will send him the law relating to the division line, but doubts if it contains the information he wants. Discusses the Virginia affair; whether to go there himself, in case of Mr. Royle's death, in order to secure the printing business to Mr. Hunter's son; reasons for and against Mr. Holt's going; for himself is resigned either to say or go, according to Mr. Franklin's desire.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Series, XVI, p. 192.

I, 99. Jones, Lewis.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 October 30A.L.S. 1p.I, 99

Woodbridge, New Jersey. Hears from Mr. Parker that he is going to England; begs him to deliver the enclosed letter to his father or Mr. Cummings; has several times written to his family, but never received any answer.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 104. Smith, John, 1722-1771.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 2A.L.S. 1p.I, 104

Burlington. Expressing pleasure at his appointment as agent of the Province; no one better qualified for the position. Wishes him success and a safe return.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 105. Baynton, Wharton, and Morgan.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 3A.L.S. 3p.I, 105

Philadelphia. Describing two tracts of land; one on the east side of Lake Champlain, the other on the north side of the Bay of Chaleur; advises a speedy petition to the Lordships for the land, as everything is being taken up.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 107. Eckerling, Samuel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 5A.L.S. 1p.I, 107

Philadelphia. His brethren, Israel and Gabriel Eckerling, were taken by the French and Indians from the Allegheny Mountains in August, 1757, and some time after sent to Rochelle in France where he is informed they died in the hosptial. Asking Franklin to inquire whether this information be true and to let him know.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 106. Quincy, Edmund, 1726-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 5A.L.S. 2p.I, 106

Boston. His wife's death together with several avocations has prevented his writing for some time past. Published in Edes and Gills paper last post-day a letter from his brother Huskc to the Committee of Merchants; a reference in this paper was supposed by some to point to Franklin, assures him that it referred to a person residing in London whose treatise on the subject he hopes to send him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LXXVIII, 41. Bowdoin, James, 1726-1790.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 12A.L.S. 1p.LXXVIII, 41

Fragment. [Boston]. Wishes Franklin a good voyage and success for his embassy.

Other Descriptive Information: Complete letterbook version of this letter is housed at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

I, 100 (OS). Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 13-20A.L. 1p.I, 100 (OS)

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of 9th inst. Concerning Franklin's "Remarks on the Protest"; W[illiam] A[llen]'s attitude in the matter. Determined to have the 'Remarks' translated into Dutch. Information received from Col. Bouquet, concerning a request for peace from the Shawanese and Delaware Indians.

General physical description: A.L. 1p.

I, 108. Howard, Martin.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 16A.L.S. 2p.I, 108

Newport, Rhode Island. Hearing of his speedy departure for London, embraces this opportunity to write him by a steamer bound thither. Flatters himself that Franklin's zeal will not be exclusively devoted to the correction of abuses in his own Province. Rhode Island but a burlesque on order and government, and not likely to improve unless the Constitution is altered; a petition to the King now in the hands of Jos. Harrison who sailed three weeks back; thinks it may be in Franklin's power to facilitate this matter. Has lost a valuable and affectionate wife.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XXXVII, 1. Williams, Jonathan, 1719-1796.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 17A.L.S. 1p.XXXVII, 1

Introducing Mr. Charles Russel, son of the Hon. James Russel of Charlestown.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 101. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 18A.L.S. 4p.I, 101

London. Mischief and danger to America and Pennsylvania likely to ensure from the disturbances and dispute in the latter Province. His high opinion of Mr. Allen's honesty and good sense; this and other reasons induced him to open his mind to him more freely than he should, on the subjects of Pennsylvania's privileges, the proprietary Government, the power of the Crown, etc.; had no idea that Mr. Allen would make these sentiments public; intended chiefly for Franklin's ear. Has just heard of the event of the election; not sorry for Franklin, but only for the Province; looks upon all hopes of reconciliation as vanished. Messages to the Governor of New Jersey.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 272).

I, 102. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 23A.L. 4p.I, 102

Philadelphia. Wrote him from New Castle the substance of the Address of the Lower Counties' Assembly, in which they inform the Crown that, although they are governed under the same charter as the people of Pennsylvania, their laws are different; proves this to be wrong, as well as certain other facts of theirs. Proprietary party still industriously endeavoring to prevent their design to change the government; petitions to this effect, from the Corporation of the City and also from the presbyterians, to go over with Mr. Hamilton. Debility of the Proprietary Government; instances the case of a Dutchman appointed sheriff at Lancaster and the refusal of the Irish Presbyterians to serve under him, ending with his forced flight to save his life; no measures taken to bring the offenders to justice. Hostile attitude of the Governor towards all, supporting the measures in favor of the Crown.  [Conclusion missing.]

General physical description: A.L. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 276).

I, 103. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 23A.L.S. 1p.I, 103

Woodbridge. Details of a business transaction with Dunlap. Left Philadelphia before the arrival of his letter from the Capes, supposes by this time he is well on his voyage. On returning home, sent off his son to bring back Lady Jane; Mrs. Franklin had some thoughts of coming, but decided not to. His debt to Mr. Strahan.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, 195.

LVIII, 32. Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 November 23A.L. 8p.LVIII, 32

Philadelphia. Provincial politics in Pennsylvania in regard to the relations of the Proprietary and the Royal parties. The re-emitting act. Military affairs. (Incomplete.)

General physical description: A.L. 8p.

I, 109. Osborne, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 NovemberA.L. 1p.I, 109

Gray's Inn, London. Has taken the liberty to send him the 15th volume of Modern History with some of his catalogues, which he does not doubt Dr. Franklin will distribute to the best advantage. Would give him infinite pleasure if a certain intricate account were settled.

General physical description: A.L. 1p.

I, 110. Small, Alexander, 1710-1794.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 1A.L.S. 4p.I, 110

London. Concerning the best means of pickling sturgeon. The best machine for uprooting trees; Franklin's idea of pulling them down by a force applied to a straight rope appealed strongly to the writer's namesake, the Virginia professor. Must have seen by the newspapers the death of Mr. Bliss, the Greenwich observer; Mr. Mitchell has unsuccessfully offered himself as a candidate; thinks the Tory interest will get it for an Oxonian who never made an observation. Rival geniuses apt to be highly jealous of one another; cites the case between Cumming, the watchmaker, and Mr. Harrison. The affair of the £5000 which was to have been given to Mr. Harrison; the law says that he is entitled to £20,000 for his discovery. England's relation to America; Franklin's friends hope he will put on paper his thoughts on this subject.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 111 (OS). Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 4A.L.S. 3p.I, 111 (OS)

Philadelphia. James Hamilton and his nephew sailed on the 28th with Capt. Friend. Letter received fron Col. Bouquet announcing a peace with the Shawanese and Delawares; terms of surrender. Rumors that an answer to Franklin's 'Remarks on a Protest' will shortly be published; satisfied that J. D. [John Dickinson?] has been applied to for his name, but his warmest friends strenously oppose his placing it there; mentions the chief points they intend to answer. Names of men left out of the Commission and one or two put it. After careful reflection, thinks nothing can contribute to their freedom so much as a Legislative Council; reasons for this. Has just seen Col. Bouquet's letter to Gov. Penn, dated at the Forks of Muskingham, Nov. 15, 1764; quotes from it the conditions of peace, the attitude of the Indians, etc.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 112. Thomson, Charles, 1729-1824.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 18A.L.S. 3P.I, 112

Philadelphia. Urgent business called him away and so prevented him from waiting on Franklin at Chester; hopes ere now he is safe in London. The first day of his journey traveled about thrity-two miles up the Lancaster Road and passed nineteen taverns; thinks to this fact is due the widespread debauchery and useless dissipation of time and money; cites the story of Cyrus and the Lydians to prove this; much better if the Governor could have a handsome fixed annual salary, instead of perquisites arising from tavern licenses. Wm. Moore put at the head of the Commission in Chester Co.; other changes made show the effect of party spirit. Reason to fear that the Indian war is not at an end; six Shawanese hostages have made their escape; trouble expected. Before Mr. Hamilton sailed, heard rumors that the Presbyterians had signed a petition to the Proprietaries requesting their influence to prevent a change of Government.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3P.

I, 113. Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 19A.L.S. 7p.I, 113

Account of the escape from Pittsburg of the Shawanese hostages; this tribe independent owing to being supplied by French traders with clothing and ammunition; no permanent peace possible until that country is taken and an English garrison established at the Illinois; one, Owens, was sent by Col. Bouquet to invite the hostages to return; an altercation ensued and Owens shot one of them dead on the spot. Delawares and Mingos desirous of having the peace confirmed. First division of the Pennsylvania forces to be disbanded, the other on its way to Carlisle. Faction at present in high spirits, declares openly that there is not the least fear of a change of Government; his father praying for that change, which only can restore peace to the distracted province.

General physical description: A.L.S. 7p.

LVIII, 33. Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 19 LVIII, 33

Philadelphia. Reply of the Protestors in the Assembly to Dr. Franklin's Remarks. Relation of the Chief Justice [William Allen] and Mr.[John] Dickinson to the Protestors.

Other Descriptive Information: For conclusion, see: I, 113.

I, 114. Hall, David, 1714-1772.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 20A.L.S. 2p.I, 114

Philadelphia. Mrs. Franklin, Sally and his son all well. Sends him that day's paper in which there is an article on Franklin's behalf by John Hughes,desiring the author or authors of an "Answer" to Franklin's " Remarks" to publish his or their names. Gives him a full account of the escape of the six Shawanese hostages and the reasons for it. A very bad gang about town, who every night rob  houses or attack people, so expects another hanging bout soon; road also intested by highwaymen.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 115 (OS). Ross, John, 1714-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 20L.S. 1p.I, 115 (OS)

Philadelphia. The most important matter since Franklin's departure has been the issuing new commissions of peace for this county and the countics of Chester and Bucks; various appointments made; names of men omitted. Opinions concerning change of Government; thinks the majority of people desire "their dear Sovereign" to rule over them if their present liberties granted by charter are preserved. Persuaded that Franklin together with Mr. Jackson, will do everything to promote the happiness, prosperity and peace of the colonies in general,and this province in particular.

General physical description: L.S. 1p.

XLIV, 3. Penn, Springett, 1739-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1764 December 22L. 1p.XLIV, 3

Dublin. Congratulates Dr. Franklin on his safe arrival in London; asks him to consult with Mr. Life in regard to putting in his claim in case his Majesty takes the government of Pennsylvania on himself ;wants to be informed whether the intail at pennsbury is barred.

General physical description: L. 1p.

XLII, 21. Stevenson, Margaret.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1764]A.L.S. 4p.XLII, 21

[London]. Asks Dr. Franklin to bring his family to England. Has had poor health. Her lodgers. Thanks for cranberries sent.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 116. Ogden, Bernard, 1734-1779.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 9A.L.S. 1p.I, 116

Sunderland in the County of Durham. Asking for information concerning the daughter of one Thos. Cookson, deceased, who married one Galloway. There are two daughters of Mr. Cookson's only sister, who have been offered a sum of money for their right to their uncle's effects; would greatly appreciate any advice as to the steps the heirs must take to come at the true value of the effects.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 116.5. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 13A.L.S. 3p.I, 116.5

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favors of Sept. 26th and Nov. 9th Confident that everything has been done to obtain the desirable object, —a Royal Government; hopes the presentation of the petitions will bring forth the desired issue. Thanking him for the notice taken of the piece signed Americanus; has nearly finished a pamphlet on the same subject entitled "Political Reflections on the dispute between Great Britain and her Colonies respecting her right of imposing taxes on them without their assent"; if Franklin's son approves, will publish it; something needed to allay the violent temper of the Americans; difficulty of getting it published; printers take everything inflammable but nothing cool and rational. Concerning a petition to the Commons for the repeal of the law prohibiting paper money from being lawful tender in the colonies; reasons why Parliament would do well to grant it. Impatiently awaiting the resolution of Parliament respecting the Stamp Act; mischief caused by the delay. Thinks there is a wide-spread intention to throw off all connection with the mother country; is confident this will meet with little sympathy in Pennsylvania.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 117. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 14A.L.S. 1p.I, 117

Woodbridge, New Jersey. Details of a business transaction with Dunlap and McNott. Mr. Foxcroft will not be up from Virginia until the beginning of February. Severity of the weather; anxious to hear of his safe arrival. Sends the last four Philadelphia newspapers.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass.Hist. Soc., 2d Series, XVI, p. 196.

I, 118. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 22A.L.S. 2p.I, 118

Woodbridge, New Jersey. Concerning his two former letters dated Nov. 23d and Jan. 14th; repeats some of the news contained in them. Matter of Dunlap's deed. Heavy fall of snow; enough sheep killed by it to put an end to the talk of woollen manufacturers. Benny Mecom's account still unpaid. Hopes Franklin will pay his (Parker's) debt to Mr. Strahan.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 119 (OS). Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 23A.L.S. 3p.I, 119 (OS)

Philadelphia. Enclosing a copy of a letter or mandate sent down by the Governor to the Provincial Commissioners of Appeal, concerning the assessment of the people's lands and those belonging to the Proprietors, the latter to be taxed at a much lower rate; asks if the Governor thinks he has the power of the Pope. The majority in the Assembly continue firm in their resolve to get rid of the Proprietary Government, the minority make no attempt to oppose it. Mr. Croghan, attended by an army officer and one hundred of the troops from Fort Pitt, is about to set off for the Illinois country to take possession on behalf of the Crown. Franklin's family well.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

LVIII, 51. Senhouse, Humphrey, 1731-1814.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 25A.L.S. 2p.LVIII, 51

Carlisle. Afflicted with a gradually increasing deafness; desires Franklin's opinion as to the possible benefit to be derived from electricity. (Mutilated.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 120. Franklin, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 January 28A.L.S. 1p.I, 120

Lutterworth. Heard that Franklin was at Lutterworth not long before and had inquired after him. Informed that he is now in London; begs for a line or two as he is anxious to come to London to see him. Sends him a hare. His wife joins him in sending love.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XL, 35. Garth, Charles.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765 February 1]L. in 3d P. 1p.XL, 35

London. Announcing Mr. Grenville's consent to give audience to the deputation.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 1p.

I, 121. All, Isaac, d. 1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 5A.L.S. 2p.I, 121

Edinburgh. Heard only the day before of his arrival in London, owing to the irregularity of the newspapers. Hopes his aunt and his cousin sally are in good health. Is now loading his ship for London where he hopes to give the pleasure of seeing his kinsman personally.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 122. Trusler, John, 1735-1820.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 6L.S. 1p.I, 122

London. Enclosing a plan of the Literary Society and requesting the honor of Franklin's name as a subscribing member. Engraved.

General physical description: L.S. 1p.

I, 124. Stiles, Ezra, 1727-1795.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 20A.L.S. 4p.I, 124

Newport. Enclosing a letter to the sieur Lomonozow at Petersburg which Franklin is to read and suppress if he likes. Curious to have an account of the discoveries of the polar voyage. His endeavors to obtain thermometrical observations from each one of the sixteen Continental provinces; fears it will be a failure owing to lack of thermometers. A detailed account of certain experiments, after M. Braunius, in the congelation of mercury. The winter one of intense cold. Hopes he will not forget to recommend that ingenious gentleman, Mr. Professor Winthrop, to the honors of the Royal Society.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 260).

I, 125. Franklin, Peter, 1692-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 21A.L.S. 2p.I, 125

Philadelphia. Hopes to hear from him by the January packet. The winter so far has been terribly cold. Mr. Foxcroft's visit to Philadelphia postponed until May. Have decided not to let Ephe Brown leave, but if Franklin consents, he would like to hire the office now in Mr. Parker's hands.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 123. Stockton, Richard, 1730-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 23A.L.S. 2p.I, 123

New York. Concerning certain letters and packets directed to Franklin, and by whose hands they have been forwarded.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 126. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 February 27A.L.S. 3p.I, 126

Philadelphia. Enclosing extract of a letter from Thomas Penn to his nephew; the account therein contained of the petitions for a change of Government from Proprietary to Royal has struck their friends with the utmost consternation; if it be true, the king has refused to listen to their complaints against Proprietary oppression and injustice; this letter is industriously circulated all over the Province by the Proprietaries and their friends; has quoted many extracts from Franklin's letter respecting the petitions, to counteract the effect of this and to allay the despair of their party; the Assembly anxious to know the result of the petitions; results to be expected, if it is true they were rejected without a hearing.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 284; Bigelow, III, 372; Smyth, IV, 364).

I, 127. All, Isaac, d. 1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 March 12A.L.S. 2p.I, 127

Edinburgh. Acknowledging favor of 3d inst. Has just undergone an operation for the cure of a fistula; expects to leave for London in about three weeks; when they meet will give him an account of his soujourn in Honduras. Desires some information about lightning rods, as a friend of his wishes to erect one on his country house.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 129. Evans, Cadwalader.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 March 15A.L.S. 3p.I, 129

Philadelphia. How they celebrated the good news of Franklin's safe arrival in London the 13th of Dec.; Dr. Thos. Bond's tedious indisposition has occasioned the sole care of the hospital to fall on him. Account of certain scurrilous attacks on them by their enemies, which they met and routed with the same weapons. Inhabitants of Cumberland County guilty of an act of rebellion ten days previous; a full account of the whole affair will be transmitted to him. Rumors from Third Street, that the Proprictor has yielded to the importunity of the Pomfret family to sell the Government to the Crown for a peerage; not anxious about the means, if the end is obtained.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 283. Note).

I, 128. Hope, John, 1725-1786.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 March 15A.L.S. 3p.I, 128

Edinburgh. Acknowledging favor of 25th ult. as well as the box of seeds; makes suggestions as to collecting and packing them; will write to Mr. Collinson soon to thank and pay him for the seeds, also to Mr. Bartram, who, if he wishes, can supply them yearly with seeds. Announcing the birth of daughter to Sir Alexander and Lady Dick.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 130. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 March 22A.L.S. 4p.I, 130

Woodbridge. No word from Franklin; has written him several times since his departure. Work he did in Philadelphia on the accounts. Samuel Smith of Burlington has been composing a history of New Jersey; has planned to go there and print it for him; intends sending Ben Mccom's printing materials there; will pay Franklin for them if he wishes it. Intends leaving the printing office and little post office at Woodbridge to his son. Hopes he will be able to pay off his debts before his death. Has had a smart attack of gout. Excessively cold winter; great poverty throughout the country. Question of his losing the comptroller's office, unless he moves to New York; reasons why he cannot live there; hopes the place of comptroller will not be taken from him; if it is unwilling to keep the post office at Woodbridge, as it does not pay him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Access digital object:
https://diglib.amphilsoc.org/islandora/object/text:191281

I, 131. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 March 25A.L.S. 2p.I, 131

Philadelphia. Concerning the act of rebellion by the inhabitants of Cumberland Country in destroying certain goods designed for the treaty at Pittsburgh; attempts made by those concerned to palliate this atrocious act; impossible to hold a treaty with the Indians without giving them the articles they stand in need of; disagreeable consequences likely to ensue.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XLII, 11. Carburi, Giovanni Battista, 1722-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765] March 27N. in 3d P. 1p.XLII, 11

The Duke of Marlborough would be delighted to have Dr. Franklin at Marlborough House and see him make the experiments in electricity. Asks him if he can come and if he needs to see, beforehand, the electric machine which would be used. (In French.)

General physical description: N. in 3d P. 1p.

LXVIII, 28a. French, Katherine.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765] March 27A.N. 1p.LXVIII, 28a

Requesting Franklin's company tomorrow evening to enjoy a little music. See also: LXVIII, 28b

XL, 180. Logan, James, 1728-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765] March 30A.L.S. 1p.XL, 180

London. Quoting a paragraph from his brother's letter, concerning the strange attitude of their Governor in not taking certain measures to make peace with the Indians, in accordance with his instructions.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 132. Mercer, George, 1733-1784.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 4L.S. 1p.I, 132

London. Asking Franklin to appoint an hour in which to talk over certain queries sent him from the Stamp Office, which he is incapable of answering.

General physical description: L.S. 1p.

I, 133. Falconer, Nathaniel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 5A.L.S. 1p.I, 133

Savanna-la-Mar, Jamaica. Announcing that he has sent him a turtle and two pairs of Spanish birds.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLII, 42. Franklin, Deborah Read Rogers, 1708-1774.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765] April 7 and 12A.L.S. 4p.XLII, 42

Philadelphia. Is glad to hear of his safe arrival in London. Family affairs.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Bigelow, III, 374).

I, 134. Brown, Ephraim Franklin.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 12A.L.S. 1p.I, 134

Philadelphia. Congratulating him on his safe arrival in England. Going on well with the post office.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 135. Newland, Trevor.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 17A.L.S. 1p.I, 135

Holt. Reasons why he was prevented waiting on him for the memorandum relative to Lecock; is only distant five or six miles from there and will gladly make any inquiry Franklin may direct. Dr. Clark and Mr. Clutterbuck have letters from a person in Philadelphia inquiring for one Carinton; does not know if this is the person Franklin wants to inquire about.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 136. Whitehurst, John, 1713-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 23A.L.S. 2p.I, 136

Derby. Expressing pleasure at his safe arrival in England and acknowledging his courtesy to Mr. Tunicliff. The bearer, Mr. Paschall, is going to reside at Halifax, Nova Scotia, and desires to know how to get some cash remitted thither. Has just heard alarming news of a Governor being lost, supposed to be Franklin's son; will be unhappy until he hears a better account.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 137. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 25A.L.S. 2p.I, 137

Burlington. Repeats various remarks made in his letter of March 22, 1765, concerning his business in Burlington and his fear of losing the office of Comptroller. To please the Governor, Mr. Foxcroft and he decided to attempt to have the post go through Burlington. Effect of the cruel stamp duty on his business; thinks the people's lot in America only a trifle better than that of the French peasants. The past winter the hardest since 1740.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 138. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 27A.L.S. 4p.I, 138

Philadelphia. Acknowledging his letter of the 13th inst., with the pamphlet wrote in vindication of the measures pursucd by P[it]t; the Colonies load of debt to England; the heavy duties, etc. The men whi destroyed the goods at Pittsburgh have been acquitted by the grand jury of Cumberland Co.; unless the King interfercs, nothing can be done. It is said that W[illiam] A[llen] has a letter from the Proprietor, declaring his intention to hold the Government and quoting the King as his authority; does not believe this, but it has added new spirits to their party. The affair of spiking the guns; accusations against various parties; the one man apprehended is probably innocent. Aversion shown by most people to have representatives in Parliamebt; reasons for it. Case of a small compact settlement about 30 miles from Pittsburg on land not yet purchased from the Indians; unless these persons are removed, it may cause another Indian war.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 139. All, Isaac, d. 1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 April 30A.L.S. 2p.I, 139

Edinburgh. An accident to his ship has delayed his departure; consults him again about a lightning rod for a friend's house.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 140. Lloyd, Thomas F..
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 2A.L.S. 2p.I, 140

Wilmington, North Carolina. The Assembly of the colony having voted £100 towards the establishment of a post through the Province, he wrote Franklin's collcaguc, Mr. Foxcroft of Viginia, to that effect. If Franklin thinks proper to comply with the request of the Province, offers his services to conduct the affair.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 127. Howard, Martin.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 14A.L.S. 2p.II, 127

Newport, Rhode Island. Wrote Franklin some time before concerning a petition possessed by Jos. Harrison, signed by a few who wish for a Royal Government. Dr. Moffat sent Franklin a pamphlet entitled, "A letter from Halifax"; this has involved him (Howard) in a paper war, in which he has taken the side of the Mother Country, against her ungrateful sons, and published "A defence of the Halifax letter." Being now made not a little obnoxious, would like Franklin to use his influence to procure him the office of Receiver of the Stamp Duties. Mr. Ward elected Governor of the Colony by a great majority.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 141. Norris, Isaac, 1701-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 18A.L.S. 2p.I, 141

Fairhill. Acknowledging his favor of Feb. 18th, with a pamphlet vindicating the power of Parliament to make general colony laws. Concerning some business with C. and O. Hanbury. Sends by the hand of Wm. Dickinson, Baskerville's two volumes of Milton's works to be neatly bound; as he has a very good edition of Milton's works printed in 1720, will chiefly value Baskerville's edition for its elegance and neatness. His health still delicate.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 143. Roberts, Hugh, 1706-1786.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 20A.L.S. 3p.I, 143

Philadelphia. Franklin's family well, although not quite settled in their new house. Goes to Chester the next day to accompany his friend Samuel Neave, who sails thence to England; praises this friend in the highest terms; hopes he and Franklin will meet. Franklin's and the Government's enemies are foiled, nay, drubbed with weapons. Visits sometimes the worthy remains of the Junto, but the political, polemical divisions have contributed to lessen that harmony, formerly enjoyed there. Concerning a pamphlet called an "Address" wherein is portrayed in striking colors; a quondam friend of theirs. Hopes Franklin will ever stand above the reach of malice and calumny.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 142. Ross, John, 1714-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 20A.L.S. 1p.I, 142

Philadelphia. Presumes by this time, Franklin can pretty nearly judge what is to be the issue of their application to His Majesty for protection; at present they have only the form without the power of Government. Acquittal of those persons who destroyed the goods at Pittsburg; since then another extraordinary affair has happened, even His Majesty's troops have been attacked and fired upon, as he will perceive from the enclosed account; in short, if His Majesty will not accept and take care of this flourishing Province, it is hard to tell where these lawless mobs will end.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 34 (OS). Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 27A.L. 4p.LVIII, 34 (OS)

Philadelphia. Expresses thanks for attention to his personal affairs. Need of a firmer government in Pennsylvania. Account of the destruction of supplies en route to the frontier troops. (Conclusion missing.)

General physical description: A.L. 4p.

I, 144. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 29A.L.S. 1p.I, 144

Burlington. Complains of not having a single line from Franklin; at a loss what to do in the Dunlap affair or in anything; Mr. Foxcroft momentarily expected in Philadelphia.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, p.197.

I, 145. Baynton, Wharton, and Morgan.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 May 30A.L.S. 2p.I, 145

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of March 9th; will certainly transmit the not for a thousand pounds by the June packet; reasons why they had not sent it earlier. Expressing sincere appreciation of the proofs of friendship shown them by Franklin.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 146 (OS). Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 June 14A.L.S. 1p.I, 146 (OS)

Philadelphia. Enclosing a general statement of accounts, and acknowledging a short letter from Franklin by Capt. Robinson. Discusses some money matters in which he seem to have expected a more generous treatment at Franklin's hands. The use he made of B.Mccom's printing materials he is willing to pay for; Mecom's effects remain in store house in New York, awaiting Franklin's orders. His health failing but endeavors to be resigned, knowing that it cannot be long before he goes hence.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Sec, XVI, p.197.

I, 147. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 June 18A.L.S. 4p.I, 147

Philadelphia. Acknowledging his letter by Capt. Robinson; the case of the Duke of Athol a curious one; still more curious are Mr. Pownall's reasons for refusing the Government, through they do credit to that gentleman. Sends the enclosed Resolves of the Lower House of Assembly of Virginia, on the Stamp Act and the right of the British Legislature in forming that law; after they were passed, the Governor procured the original minutes, tore them up and instantly dissolved the Assembly. The hopes of a change contained in Franklin's last letter give great joy. Thanks him for his efforts to see aside the intended application for the Delaware Islands.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 298).

LVIII, 118. Thomson, Charles, 1729-1824.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765 June 19]L. 2p.LVIII, 118

Wretched condition of affairs in America; debts and heavy taxes; trouble with the Indians; heavy duties on all goods, especially wines ; proofs of their being, on longer freemen. (Fragment.) The complete letter, addressed to Franklin from "A Merchant in Philadelphia," was printed in The London Chronicle, August 17-20, 1765.

General physical description: L. 2p.

I, 148. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 June 24A.L.S. 2p.I, 148

Philadelphia. Dissatisfaction in Pennsylvania respecting the Stamp Act. A Congress at New York proposed. Virginia resolutions.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 297).

I, 149. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 June 28A.L.S. 1p.I, 149

Philadelphia. Introducing Mr. John Williams, a gentleman lately come over on business of the Treasury, by order of the Ministry.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 150. Dick, Alexander, Sir, 1703-1785.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 July 5A.L.S. 3p.I, 150

Prestonfield. Acknowledging favor of 2d ult.; expressing the obligation he and his friend, Mr. Swinton, are under to Franklin for certain information. His willingness to serve Franklin's young friend, [Samuel] Bard; can obtain board for him with that excellent gentleman, Mr. Blacklock, the blind poet; advantages incident to such a position. Inoculated his son and three little daughters for small-pox, from which they emerged very happily.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 151. Falconer, Nathaniel.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 July 14A.L.S. 1p.I, 151

Off Dover. Concerning several packets which he is to deliver with his own hand to Franklin as soon as his ship gets up to London.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 152. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 July 16A.L.S. 2p.I, 152

Philadelphia. The Resolves of the House of Virginia, enclosed in his letter of the 15th June, were not the ones entered into by them; encloses a copy of the right ones which are much more consistent with their duty to the Crown. Cumberland County inhabitants determined to hinder any supply going out to Pittsburg, and thereby bring on another Indian war; cites instance of thier burning the goods belonging to one Joseph Spear. Especially impatient to hear from Franklin, as their election draws near. Governor Franklin and his spouse with Joseph Galloway, gone to Shrewsbury.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: See Resolutions relative to the Stamp Act, 30 May 1765; LII, 42.

I, 153. Lunan, Alexander.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 July 31A.L.S. 2p.I, 153

Philadelphia. Gilbert Elliot, Esq., is his friend; and his cousin, Lord Pitfour, one of the Senators of the College of Justice at Edinburgh, has promised his interest to any gentleman who will point out to him anything whereby he can serve him (Lunech); would beg this favor of Franklin.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LXVI, 11. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 August 1D.S. 3p.LXVI, 11

Bond for £65, 12s., given to Benjamin Franklin. Notes and receipt by Doborah Franklin and B. Franklin.

General physical description: D.S. 3p.

II, 188. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 August 8A.L.S. 4p.II, 188

New York. Acknowledging commission as Land-Waiter at New York; thanking Franklin for this favor. Difficulties in moving to New York before May. Engaged in printing the votes of the New Jersey Assembly, also a History of New Jersey, by Samuel Smith, of Burlington. Would perfer to continue in the service of the post-office; asks if Franklin could transfer the office of Land-Waiter to his son, who has greatly reformed. Their old friend, Hugh Hughes, ruined. Arrival of Mr. Royal from Virginia. No hopes of B. Mecom's succeeding in New Haven.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

Access digital object:
https://diglib.amphilsoc.org/islandora/object/text:255082

I, 154. Penington, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 August 10A.L.S. 1p.I, 154

Bristol. His favor of 3d inst, concerning one Mrs. Bigelow; her penniless position.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 155. Miller, Jeremiah, 1719-1797.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 August 13A.L.S. 2p.I, 155

New London. Concerning the office of Comptroller, which Col. Dyer wishes to transfer to the writer's son, John Still Miller; asks Franklin to mention his or his family's name to Mr. Grenville.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 156. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 August 14A.L.S. 2p.I, 156

Philadelphia. Conduct of the frontier inhabitants who have just murdered and Indian lad; Delawares assert that unless they receive satisfaction, and a stop is put to other abuses, they will declare war. Account received from Geo. Croghan, who is pursuing his passage down the Ohio; was set upon by Indians belonging to pontiac; lost three of the Shawancse chiefs; he and his nephew were slightly wounded; finding out who they were, the Indians promised not to molest them further. A charge against Franklin, read some Sundays past in several Dutch clrurches, that he had expressed publicly his enmity to the Dutch and obtained additional taxes on Dutch paper, etc. Death of William Plumstead; nautre of the disease; question of who will succeed him in the office of Probate for Wills. An advertisement, published by John Dickinson, informing the electors of this county of his determination to decline the serivce.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 157. Balfour, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 September 2A.L.S. 2p.I, 157

Edinburgh. Acknowledging favor of 9th ult. giving an account of Mr. Mecom's affairs; thinks that young gentleman is much to be pities; considers that Franklin has acted generously in suffering Mr. Mecom's effects to be equally divided amongst his creditors. Asks him to recommend an honest attorney in New York, as one James Parker owes him a good deal of money. Mr. Robert Alexander stands as candidate for the horough of Anstrather in the place of Sir Harry Erskine.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 158. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 September 22A.L.S. 1p.I, 158

Burlington. Acknowledging favor of July 6th; will send him tables of rates of postage as soon as he can print them. Mr. Hall's accounts. Concerning the possibility of procuring that place in the custom house for his son, who has mended his ways. Saw Mr. Hughes in Philadelphia, who is poorly. Will doubtless hear from many quarters of the commotions, related to the Stamp Act; thinks one-half the Americans will die rather than yield.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Series, XVI, P. 199.

LXXVIII, 54. Wister, Daniel, 1738-1805.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 September 22A.L.S. 1p.LXXVIII, 54

Philadelphia. [First part missing] understand the German Language. Wishes Franklin health, happiness and a speedy return. Fragment.

I, 160. Hopkinson, Mary Johnson, 1718-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 1A.L.S. 2p.I, 160

Expressing her intense gratitude to Franklin after his kindness in tracing out her family; of all her husband's old friend, but one gentleman besides himself has been good enough to extend their regard to his wire and children; sends him an order on Messrs. Barclay and Sons for the expense he has been at in this affair.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 161. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 5A.L.S. 1p.I, 161

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of 13th July. Result of the elections; got in every man they proposed; I. Norris, J. Fox, J. Galloway, J. Richardson, R. Evans, T. Livezey, M. Hillegas and Henry Pawling; thus it has fared throughout the Province, except in Berks, where they lost their worthy friend John Ross. Arrival of the Vessel with the Stamped paper created much confusion and disorder; inhabitants gathered at the State House by beat of drum; their object, the destruction of J. Hughes or the surrender of his office; it ended in his promising to resign, J. Dickinson, G. Bryan, and J. Morton now in New York in consultation with the Committees from the other Colonies relative to the Stamp ACt.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 162. Morgan, John, 1735-1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 10A.L.S. 2p.I, 162

Philadelphia. Expressing the warmest gratitude to Franklin, not only for the kindness he has shown to him but also to his relations and friends; thanking him for advancing the fees necessary to admit him to the fellowship of the Royal Society. His appointment as professor of medicine in the College. Announces his marriage on the 5th ult. to Miss Molly Hopkinson.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 163. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 10A.L.S. 2p.I, 163

Woodbridge. Difficult job he has had printing a table of rates for the post-office; has had neither time for Mr. Hall's accounts nor for Samuel Smith's History. His intention of going to New York in the Spring. Black cloud hanging over America; people are running mad and declare it is as good to die by the sword as by famine.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, p. 200.

LXXVIII, 52. Waln, Nicholas, 1742-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 11A.L. 2p.LXXVIII, 52

Philadelphia. From Franklin and Mr. Jackson's letters, Waln has no doubt that Franklin will be able to bring about a change of government, which with the priviledges secured will constitute an event worthy the persons employed in its negotiation. Fragment.

Other Descriptive Information: For possible envelope to this letter, see: LXXVIII, 60.

LVIII, 35. Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 13A.L. 2p.LVIII, 35

Philadelphia. Events in Philadelphia upon arrival of the news of the change of Ministry. Jubilant attitude of the Proprietary party and renewed attacks upon Dr.Franklin.  (Conclusion missing.)

General physical description: A.L. 2p.

I, 164. Whitehurst, John, 1713-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 20A.L.S. 2p.I, 164

Derby. Since Mr. Ludlam's report of Mr. Harrison's time keeper has been made public has formed a plan for rendering such a machine of general use; explains the means by which he hopes to accomplish it.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 165. Walker, Hannah Farrow.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 October 26A.L.S. 2p.I, 165

Westbury. Confessing some offence [not mentioned] on her own and her husband's part against Franklin, and begging most humbly forgiveness; tells a pitiful tale of hard work, ill health and poverty.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 166. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 November 6A.L.S. 1p.I, 166

Burlington. Acknowledging favor of Sept. 17th. Dreadful commotions in this country. His visit to New York postponed. Desires to know what disposition he is to make of the printing materials, when he leaves Burlington. Has gout in his right hand, so must be brief.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass, Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, p. 202.

I, 167. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 November 7A.L.S. 3p.I, 167

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of 19th August. Meetings like the one relative to the Stamp Act, held in New York, may in future be of great service to America. Refers him to his letter of the 5th ult. to see the result of the elections. In the new election for the city held to determine whether J. Pemberton or G. Bryan was elected, the former was chosen by a large majority; reasons for this. An association formed and articles signed by a great number of merchants, declaring they will not import from Britain any goods or merchandise until the Stamp Act is repcaled; thinks this method far more eligible than the imprudent and unwarrantable steps taken by several Colonies. Account of the populace in New York having assembled to the number of thousands, burnt the Governor's coach and obliged him to give up the Stamp papers, which they are determined to send back to London; seeing the multitude resolved. G. Gage advised the delivery; they also destroyed all the furniture belonging to Major James, who had said he would enforce obedience to the Act. Hourly expect some person to call on B. Chew; will then know what part he will act; he is considered as Probate of Wills, King's Attorney and Recorder of Philadelphia.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 168. Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 November 13A.L. 4p.I, 168

Burlington. Hard pressed for time owing to a vessel's sailing early the next morning; is obliged to write to the Lords of Trade to acquaint them with the situation as regards the Stamp Act; has found it difficult to steer safely between the people in America and the Ministry in England; none of the Governors have received the least directions with regard to their conduct at this critical time. Congratulates himself that the Proprietary party published those lies against him, thereby giving him an opportunity, by a seasonable answer, to remove the prejudices of the people; stands well with them now; their resentment directed against the Speaker; gives reasons for this. At the last meeting of the Council, Mr. David Ogden moved that he (the Governor) should call the Assembly without an application on the part of the members; means he took to avoid this; thinks Gov. Bernard and Gov. Colden, by unneccssary officiousness, have made matters much worse; considers any man who sets himself up as an advocate of the Stamp Act in the Colonies, is guilty of a mere piece of quixotism; discusses the feasibility of ignoring the Stamp Act. [Conclusion of the letter is missing.]

General physical description: A.L. 4p.

I, 169 (OS). Penington, Edward, 1726-1796.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 November 14A.L.S. 3p.I, 169 (OS)

Philadelphia. Four years ago, his correspondence with springett Penn began, concerning his affairs in America; faithfulness with which he has attended to his concerns; hears from a gentleman of undoubted credit, that the Proprietor has been treating with his nephew for the purchase of Pennsbury Manor; thinks this unfair; not only would he (Penington) lose his commission, but is sure Mr. Penn will not get the worth of his lands. Has reason to believe that Thos. Penn has prejudiced his kinsman against him; asks Franklin to rectify this. Need of surveying the land accurately before selling; mean artifices practised to cheat the elder branch of the Penn family.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

I, 171. Balfour, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 November 21A.L.S. 1p.I, 171

Edinburgh. Concerning the debt due him and Mr. Hamilton by James Parker; would like it paid without the trouble of prosecuting; asks Franklin's good offices in this matter.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 172. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Messrs. Jackson and Franklin, London
1765 November 29A.L.S. 2p.I, 172

Philadelphia. Transmitting a memorial from the merchants of Philadelphia to the merchants and manufacturers of Great Britain.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 302).

LXXVIII, 37. Ross, John, 1714-1776.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765 November]A.L. 1p.LXXVIII, 37

Fragment. The letter is obviously from a Philadelphia friend and political ally of Franklin, and either an officeholder or a lawyer whose activities were adversely affected by the situation after the Stamp Act was supposed to go into operation. Is thought to be written by Ross,Philadelphia lawyer and political associate of Franklin.

I, 173 (OS). Baynton, Wharton, and Morgan.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 December 6A.L.S. 2p.I, 173 (OS)

Philadelphia. Concerning a tax on a cargo of rum sent by them to Quebec; if judgment is passed against their agent there, who has declined to pay it, will appeal it to the King in Council; considers the action of Mr. Murray, Governor of Quebec, in taxing spirituous liquors, a high encroachments on their rights as Englishmen. Case of Mr. Cunningham, an attorney at Quebec, who was suspended by the Governor without any stated cause; the real reason was his opposition to the Governor on this same question; asks Franklin to give him an audience on this subject, when he arrives in England.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 174. Goolding, Timothy.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 December 7A.L.S. 1p.I, 174

London. Concerning some damask curtains for the Governor [Franklin] and his lady.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

I, 175. Hopkinson, Francis, 1737-1791.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 December 13A.L.S. 4p.I, 175

Philadelphia. Esteem themselves very happy in having a friend like Franklin, who will represent their characters in a favorable light, to their relation, the Bishop. Franklin's advice to send Mr. Burrows a present of sturgeon or apples with their letter of thanks, came too late, the letter having gone; however, will ship them at once. Concerning Miss Sally's harpsichord whose machinery is so complex that no one could keep it in order but the man who made it; as Miss Sally plays so well, suggests the advisability of buying her a new one. Has finished the translation of the Psalms of David to the great satisfaction of the Dutch congregation at New York.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

I, 176. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 December 20A.L.S. 2p.I, 176

Burlington. Acknowledging favor of the middle of September, with invoice of goods sent to Mr. Hughes of New York; disposition to be made of them. Has had a prolonged and severe attack of the gout; his son also has been very ill, at death's door, but is a little better; all this has delayed his accounts with Mr. Hall, also his departure for New York. B. Mecom's affairs.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

I, 177. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1765 December 30A.L.S. 1p.I, 177

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of Sept. 26. Overjoyed that the Petitions are presented and that there is a good chance of their success, notwithstanding the contradictory assertions of the Proprietary party. Stamped paper not allowed to land, some of it sent on board Captain Hawker. No business done in the courts, nor is the Port of New York opened.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

LVIII, 81. Franklin, Peter, 1692-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]A.L. 1p.LVIII, 81

Request to send money by the first opportunity and to ask for a letter for him at the post office. (Incomplete).

General physical description: A.L. 1p.

LVIII, 36a. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]A.L.S. 4p.LVIII, 36a

Democratic notions in America may lead to the independence of the Colonies from England. Distress on account of the Stamp Act. An address of the merchants of Pennsylvania to the merchants of London. Proceedings of the Stamp Act Congress. (First part missing. See also: LVIII, 36b)

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LVIII, 36b. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]A.L.S. 4p.LVIII, 36b

Democratic notions in America may lead to the independence of the Colonies from England. Distress on account of the Stamp Act. An address of the merchants of Pennsylvania to the merchants of London. Proceedings of the Stamp Act Congress. (First part missing. See also: LVIII, 36a)

LVIII, 36c. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]A.L.S. 2p.LVIII, 36c

Success of the Royal party against the Protestors in the autumn election. Resignation of Mr. [John] Hughes as stamp distributor. Stagnation of business on account of the Stamp Act. (First part missing.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

LVI(i), 5. Jackson, Richard.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]3p.LVI(i), 5

Opinion as to the power of Parliament over the Colonies.

General physical description: 3p.

XLII, 39 (OS). Salt, Samuel.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]A.L.S. 1p.XLII, 39 (OS)

The death of his wife, Dr. Franklin's relation. Shall be proud to see him at Bermingham.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XL, 81. Whately, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]L. in 3d P. 1p.XL, 81

Parliament St., London. Asking Franklin to call upon him at the Treasury the following morning.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 1p.

XLIX, 48. Unidentified.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765]L. 4p.XLIX, 48

A few hints relative to a general theory or natural history of the earth, principally calculated to prove that fossil shells were originally the offspring of the sea. (Incomplete.)

General physical description: L. 4p.

LXVIII, 33c. Potts, Henry.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1767]1 p.LXVIII, 33c

Invites Franklin to dinner next the 19th instant. An answer is desired.

LXVIII, 37. Collinson, Peter, 1694-1768.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1768]1 p.LXVIII, 37

Much obliged for his dear friend calling yesterday. Invites Franklin to dinner next Thursday, two o'clock and then go afterwards to Crane Court. Collinson is engaged to dine in Franklin's neighborhood today after being asked on Sunday.

LXVIII, 39. Cumming, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1774]1 p.LXVIII, 39

Inviting Franklin to dine with him on a bit of venison (from Brislay park) at three o'Clock, with their friend John Wright at C's house.

LXVIII, 25a. Bathurst, Allen Bathurst, Baron, 1684-1775.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 25a

Invites Franklin to dinner today, if not engaged, to meet Mr. Scott.

LXVIII, 25b. Bathurst, Allen Bathurst, Baron, 1684-1775.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 25b

Invites Franklin to dinner on Sunday to meet Mr. Scott.

LXVIII, 56b. Bridgen, Edward.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 56b

Monday morning. Begs the favour that he will send per the bearer the map he was so kind to promise him.

LXVIII, 57a. Cooper, Grey, Sir.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 57a

Sends his compliments and thanks for the "obliging enquiries."

LXVIII, 42. Mead, Mrs. Samuel. Mead, Samuel.
to Margaret Stevenson and Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 42

Sorry they were not able to visit with Franklin on the day he was at leisure. They hope the first convenient time Franklin has that he will visit, and that Mrs. Stephenson will be so good to bring the young gentleman she mentioned! Mr. and Mrs. Mead will be at home any day, as they shall be every day!

LXVIII, 33a. Pownall, Thomas, 1722-1805.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]2 item(s)LXVIII, 33a

Dinner invitation. On the reverse, Franklin has written a memo: "Forts. and Indian Expenses. Ministers make an impossible Act and run mad that it will not execute." See also: LXVIII, 33b

LXVIII, 33b. Pownall, Thomas, 1722-1805.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775] LXVIII, 33b

Dinner invitation. On the reverse Franklin has written: "Steel Pen for Mr. Strahan" See also: LXVIII, 33a

LXVIII, 45. Pownall, Thomas, 1722-1805.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 45

Invites Franklin, if he has nothing better to do, to call on Pownall this morning and take a family dinner with him. Pownall would call on Franklin, but is having "the symptoms of a great Minister strong upon by name the Gout" and is not able to walk.

LXVIII, 46. Pownall, Thomas, 1722-1805.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 46

Is necessarily detained at home to too late an hour for breakfasting. He will, if not inconvenient, call upon Franklin at about eleven.

LXVIII, 58a. Seyfferth, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 58a

In Great St. Andrews Street at Clockmaker Mr. Rimbauto, the top of St. Martins Lane.

LXVIII, 51. Strahan, William (1715-1785). Strahan, Margaret Penelope.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 51

Sending compliments to Franklin and the ladies, and thinking it may be more agreeable and convenient not to dine until three o'clock today.

LXVIII, 50b. Strahan, William (1715-1785).
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 50b

Asks Franklin to send the letter by the bearer.

LXVIII, 35b. Wood, Mr.. Wood, Mrs..
to Benjamin Franklin
[1765-1775]1 p.LXVIII, 35b

Saturday night. Inviting Franklin to dinner tomorrow at three o'clock.

II, 1. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 January 4 and 11A.L.S. 6p.II, 1

Burlington. Accounts connected with the post-office. Concerning the disposal of the goods sent by Franklin to J. Hughes; that gentleman unable to take them; has not surrendered his estate, but keeps a school and avoids the sheriff; he has offered to give up everthing, but his creditors wish him sent to jail. B. Mecom's accounts and depts. Detailed reasons for thinking £150 of the money Mr. Holt is sued for in New Haven belongs to him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 6p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, 202.

II, 2. Kent, Benjamin, 1708-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 January 19A.L.S. 1p.II, 2

Boston. Still challenges the honor of being Franklin's friend. Describes the late discovery by an Indian of a small wilderness root, which, taken steeped in Maderira, has not failed to carry off any fit of the gout in a few hours' time.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 3. Beveridge, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 January 20A.L.S. 2p.II, 3

Philadelphia. Sends three copies of 'Familiar Epistles,' which he has printed, two for Dr. Pringle and one for Franklin: asks his good offices in procuring orders from his friends or the book sellers.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penna. Press, No. 2107.

II, 4. Chew, Joseph.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 January 24A.L.S. 4p.II, 4

New London. Increased confusion of the times; Mr. Ingersoll so far intimidated as to give up his letters public and private. Although he [Mr. Chew] "disapproved in the most modest manner of the Stamp Act, " is looked upon with disfavor by the advocates of extreme methods. In New York the stamp papers were burned. Read a letter from Mr. Conway, Secretary of State to the Governor of Rhode Island, couched in the strongest terms, demanding the people's submission to all acts of the English Legislature and calling upon Gen. Gage and Lord Colville, in case force is needed, to maintain order and good government; trembles for the consequences. Finds himself in hard straits for money; would be much indebted to Franklin if he could procure him a place in any department in a Colony north of Carolina.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

II, 5 (OS). Dunlap, William.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 February 1A.L.S. 2p.II, 5 (OS)

Falmouth. An account of his affairs in Barbadoes; desires to live there but has not sufficient income; heard of vacancy there for the office of Searcher of His Majesty's Customs for the port of Bridgetown; begs Franklin's interest on his behalf in this important matter; encloses an application to the Secretary of the Treasury on the same subject. Has a very advantageous offer for the disposition of his interest in Philadelphia, which, if closed with, would enable him in time to pay off his debts.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 6. Read, George, 1733-1798.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 February 7A.L.S. 1p.II, 6

Advising the sale of a piece of land, belonging to Mrs. Franklin, lying about 20 miles from his; reasons against renting it.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 7. Crowley, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 February 8A.L.S. 2p.II, 7

London. Denying the authorship of a paragraph in the Gazetteer of Feb. 1st, that the taxes in America do not amount to more than eight pence per head, whereas in England, to pay the interest only of money spent in Great Britain to defend America, they amount to twelve shillings. Strongly advocates conciliatory measures.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 8. Penn, Springett, 1739-1766.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 February 12A.L.S. 1p.II, 8

Dublin. A long time ago desired to ask Mr. Life for enough of his mother's money to purchase a lottery ticket. Mr. Jackson gives him no hopes of succeeding in his claim to the Government.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLII, 22. Barry, Amelia Evans.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1766 February 18]A.L.S. 3p.XLII, 22

Is about to sail for America. Asks for a loan of money.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

LXXVIII, 76b. Priestley, Joseph, 1733-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1766 February]A.L.S. 1p.LXXVIII, 76b

Fragment. Thinks he is able to carry to completion the large plan [probably a history of electricity], provided that Franklin and his other friends in London support him.

II, 9. Syng, Philip, 1703-1789.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 1A.L.S. 1p.II, 9

Philadelphia. Acknowledging the present of Dr.Lewis's new work, wherein the management of gold and silver is so well treated. The Junto fainted in the heat of the preceding summer and has not yet revived; Franklin's presence needed to reanimate it.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 10. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 2A.L.S. 2p.II, 10

Philadelphia. Proprietary party say openly that there will be no change of Government; all he and his friends can urge are Franklin's integrity, capacity, and his assurance that the petitions are not rejected. Certain men on the Court side only lie in wait to augment the least omission on Franklin's part; the December packet having brought two letters from Franklin to Joseph Galloway and none to the Committee of Correspondence, they declare it contrary to his instructions and are endeavoring to prejudice members of the Assembly against him. Parson Millenburg denies that the letter mentioned before was read in the Dutch church. James Tilghman's appointment to the land office in place of William Peters, gives general satisfaction. Informed that the Courts are to be opened that week.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 11. Barry, Amelia Evans.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 6A.L.S. 2p.II, 11

Portsmouth. Apologizing for not waiting on him before she left town; expects to sail on the Aeolus; Sir William Erskine among the passengers, who is "going to visit the remains of ancient magnificence in the African World." Telling him where to send for a copper plate of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, etc., belonging to her father; thinks he might find it of use some day.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 12. Priestley, Joseph, 1733-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 25A.L. 3p.II, 12

Warrington. Describing certain experiments in electricity; progress he is making in his treatise on electricity; wishes Franklin would procure for him the Histoire d'Electricite he mentions, and certain other books; has decided to relate Mr. Wilson's experiments just as he published them with very few remarks. (Lower part of sheet missing.)

General physical description: A.L. 3p.

II, 13. Hutchinson, Thomas, 1711-1780.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 26A.L.S. 1p.II, 13

Boston. His son bound for London; expected to have gone himself, but his friends dissuaded him; hopes his son will obtain for him some relief under his great sufferings; asks Franklin to caution the young man against the snares and temptations of London.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 14. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 March 27A.L.S. 2p.II, 14

Woodbridge. His son convalescent; is preparing for New York with all possible expedition. Can get no settlement nor any money from Holt. Disposition made of Franklin's box of books. Has not received a penny from Benny Mecom nor any reply to his letters.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, 207.

II, 15. Priestley, Joseph, 1733-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 April 13A.L.S. 3p.II, 15

Warrington. Acknowledging favor of 10th inst., also the parcels of books, from the perusal of which he expects to make valuable additions to his History; this work will come into Franklin's hands in an imperfect condition; hopes he will correct any errors in the French Words, etc. Would be glad of Franklin's opinion on his experiments with vanes; has been wholly employed lately constructing an electrical machine upon a new and improved plan. Mr. Boulanger's remarks on experiments with condensed air. Sends various messages to Mr. Canton. Hopes he can procure him Beccaria's work; sorry that Wilkes' piece is not complete.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 16. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 April 26A.L.S. 2p.II, 16

Philadelphia. Many contradictory reports circulated until the true account arrived of the Stamp Act being repealed; hopes peace will be restored. Compares number of Presbyterian meeting-houses in America with number of churches belonging to the Church of England; ten times as many of the former; disapproves of this. All trade at a standstill; neither can they pay their debts unless Great Britain allows general free trade. In order to relieve their distress, nearly two hundred poor women employed in spinning flax in the factory. Announces the birth of a son, whom they have taken the liberty to name Franklin Wharton; hopes this proof of their regard will not be disagreeable to him.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 17. Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 April 30A.L.S. 4p.II, 17

Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of Feb. 25th; fears his letter of the 16th was lost at sea; begs for a copy, if he has it. Keen satisfaction afforded Franklin's friends by the accounts of his examination at the bar of the House of Commons; prominent part played by him in the repeal of the Stamp Act; every merchant writes home as if he alone had accomplished the affair. Sensible letter from the Committee of Merchants in London, but all such advice is frustrated by the people's indiscretion. Is not surprised at Franklin's disapproval of his speech against the Proprietary officers, in answer to the Lodge paper; at such a distance, does not think a right judgment can be formed; all his friends think he acted rightly; Gov. Hutchinson thought the attacks on him beneath notice; the consequence was his house and effects were destroyed and his life endangered. Encloses two applications for favors from the Ministry: one from Col. Croghan, the other from Mr. Geo. Read. Account of a company formed by himself and others to purchase from the French certain lands at the Illinois. Does not want the Chronicle stopped. Betsy sends a cordial thanks for the notice taken of her nephew.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

II, 18 (OS). Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 6A.L.S. 2p.II, 18 (OS)

New York. Has arrived in New York and accepted the place of Land Waiter; his state of health improved but precarious. Reasons against printing a newspaper himself; his rival in the business would be Mr. Holt who owes him a great sum of money and will probably pay it in time if not interfered with; Holt is aided and abetted by the Sons of Liberty, who carry all before them; everyone afraid to speak against them. Must take the box of goods himself, and will allow Franklin interest from the present day. Benny Mccom promises everything but does not pay a farthing. Acknowledging his favor of Feb. 26, just received.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, 209.

LII, 56. Pennsylvania. Provincial Assembly.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 7D. attested by Cha[rle]s Moore, Clerk 1p.LII, 56

That the Agents of the Province be directed to address their business letter to the Committee of Correspondence.

General physical description: D. attested by Cha[rle]s Moore, Clerk 1p.

II, 20. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 9A.L.S. 2p.II, 20

Philadelphia. Receipt of the news of the repeal of the Stamp Act. Eminent services of Dr. Franklin acknowledged. Pennsylvania Hospital.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, with the exception of two unimportant paragraphs, in Works (Sparks, VII, 313).

II, 21. Hunt, Isaac.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 21A.L.S. 2p.II, 21

Philadelphia. Concerning a contest for the best essay, written on "The reciprocal advantages of a perpetual union between Great Britain and her Colonies"; the reward, a medal, was won by Dr. Morgan; the writer was a contestant and considers himself unfairly used by the Trustees of the College; sends both papers to Franklin for judgment; by advice of his friends will publish his essay with a dedication to Franklin, whom he trusts will forgive so great a freedom. On applying for his Master's Degree, an honor he was entitled to, his printer, a poor ignorant man, was summoned and examined as to political pamphlets he (Hunt) had written; later his application was refused, without hearing what he had to say; his ambition greatly checked by this cruel behavior. Praises Franklin's great work in connection with the repeal of the Stamp Act.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 19 (OS). Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 22A.L.S. 2p.II, 19 (OS)

Philadelphia. Joyous and satisfactory news of the repeal of the Stamp Act; universal pleasure it diffused. Illumination took place on the evening of the 20th; on the 21st a handsome dinner was provided at the Stadt House and concluded with much decency. There it was agreed that all who (from a patriotic spirit) had procured suits of home-made cloth should give them to the poor, and on the King's birth day appear in new suits of broadcloth made in England. The intention on part of a few to introduce in the Address to the King, Lords and Commons some remarks against the Proprietary Government. A plan conceived by himself and four others to purchase a chain of lots belonging to Springett Penn, which lie between 2d Street and the river Schuylkill; asks Franklin to find out Mr. Penn's price for these and also for Pennsborough Manor. Mentions names of those elected as managers for the work house, which is to be erected.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 22. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 May 23A.L.S. 2p.II, 22

Philadelphia. Proceedings in Philadelphia on the repeal of the Stamp Act. The part acted by Franklin in procuring the repeal heartily commended.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, with the exeception of the concluding six lines, in Works (Sparks, VII, 317).

II, 23. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 7A.L.S. 4p.II, 23

Philadelphia. Transmitting a letter from the Committee of Correspondence, enclosing an Address from the Assembly to His Majesty; their objections to the Proprietaries not due to personal resentment, but to the unhappiness and injury their government has caused. Great opposition shown to a resolve giving His Majesty assurances of granting aids for the defence of the colonies; reasons for and against; finally passed. Describes the Governor's conduct during the late trouble; evident from Secretary Conway's letter to the Governor, approving of his conduct, "that his honor deceived Mr. Conway by a eulogium on himself which he did not deserve." malevolence of the Chief Justice against Franklin, as shown by public accusation in the House that Franklin was the greatest enemy to the repeal of the Stamp Act. Assembly's grateful sense of the firmness and integrity with which Franklin has served his country. Various considerations which point to the policy and wisdom of changing the Government from Proprietary to Royal. The Assembly, not suspecting that the petitions are rejected and being in debt, are anxious to push them to a conclusion.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LXVIII, 64. Behr, Baron.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 101 p.LXVIII, 64

Presents his compliments and wishes Franklin a happy journey.

II, 24. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 11A.L.S. 8p.II, 24

New York. Acknowledging favor of Apr. 6. Unjust treatment he has suffered at Mr. Holt's hands; recounts in detail every transaction he has had with Mr. Holt since their first meeting, at present it stands thus; if Holt will settle his debt to him within three months, well and good; if not, he will arrest him and start to print a rival newspaper. Complaints of the amount he earns as Land-Waiter, of the misfortunes he has had to struggle against, of Mr. Colden, his assistants in the post-office, and of many other things. Bulk of people still dispute authority from home; notwithstanding the late Act of parliament directing every Captain of a vessel to carry all letters to the post-office, the moment a ship comes in, the letters are seized by force and carried to the coffee-house where they are cried out and delivered. Included with letter was Parker's "An Humble Address to the Publick" (LXXVII, 5).

General physical description: A.L.S. 8p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Proc. Mass. HIst. Soc., 2d Ser., XVI, p.212.

Access digital object:
https://diglib.amphilsoc.org/islandora/object/text:255104

LXVIII, 75a. Small, William, 1734-1775.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 112 p.LXVIII, 75a

Birmingham. Glad that Sir John Pringle is happy and so agreable a fellow traveller, and begs leave to trouble him with the inclosed letter and bill, in case they take Hague in their way. If not the doctor may burn them. Mr. Johnson is a very polite man, and will be very ready to do Sir John and Dr. Franklin any service in his power. Sincerely wishes them a pleasant journey, and happy return.

II, 25. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 12A.L.S. 1p.II, 25

Philadelphia. Sentiments of Dr. Franklin's friends in Pennsylvania respecting his manner of executing his agency in England. Great honor due Dr. Fothergill for his piece written on the stamp Act.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in works (Sparks, VII, 318).

II, 26. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 16A.L.S. 3p.II, 26

Philadelphia. Fine qualities of those worthy men now at the head of public affairs. Great relief caused by Franklin's letter to the Committee of Correspondence, announcing that the petitions will be proceeded on. Infamous and groundless charge preferred against Franklin by the Chief Justice. Regulations in American commerce. Currency. Proprietors determined to give their friends twelve months' notice before surrendering the government.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 321).

II, 27 (OS). Read, John.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 17A.L.S. 1p.II, 27 (OS)

Philadelphia. Enclosing a copy of a letter to reinstate him in the King's service; chance of his being appointed Commissary of the Southwest or Pennsylvania district. Mr. Allen's assertion in the House that Franklin was the great cause of bringing on the Stamp Act. Dr. Smith's remarks relative to an American Bishopric resented by the Presbyterian clergy.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 28. Wythe, George, 1726-1806.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 June 23A.L.S. 1p.II, 28

Virginia. Begging Franklin to recommend his promotion in the House of Burgesses; promises to be an exception to a quotation from Tacitus regarding ingratitude. (Partially mutilated.)

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 30. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 July 1A.L.S. 3p.II, 30

New York. The Assembly of New Jersey broken up; Gov. Franklin and Miss Sally at Newark. Commotion excited by the Stamp Act not yet subsided. Complains of a complication of sickness, infirmities and wrongs; no money from B. Mecom; no business in his shop; expense of living in New York; inadequate pay he receives as Land-Waiter. Reasons for business being so excessively dull throughout the colonies.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 31. Broughton, Sarah.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 July 3A.L.S. 2p.II, 31

Philadelphia. Concerning a feather bed which she sold to Mrs. Franklin, and which that lady refused to pay for; appeals to Franklin for justice.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

XLII, 2. Franklin, William, 1731-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 July 10A.L.S. 2p.XLII, 2

Indian murders. Resolutions of Parliament relative to commerce. Assembly troubles in Virginia and Massachusetts. His victory over the New Jersey Assembly.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 32. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 July 15A.L.S. 4p.II, 32

New York. Acknowledging favor of May 9th; delays printing a newspaper in hopes of getting a settlement with Holt. Reasons for the dull and gloomy outlook in New York, and the high prices for everything. Mr. Hall's accounts. Electrical machine not yet delivered. Goes over again all his crosses and hardships; would be glad of a better allowance in the post-office. His types all worn out; asks Franklin to aid him in getting some new ones. Thinks Mr. Colden rather too much of a gentleman for the due execution of the post-office duties. His son stronger.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

II, 33. Balfour, James.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 August 1A.L.S. 2p.II, 33

Virginia, Little England. Acknowledging Franklin's kindness to him while in London; embraces every opportunity to set forth publicly Franklin's eminent services to America; his great qualities certain to confound his enemies.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 34. Brown, Ephraim Franklin.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 August 25A.L.S. 2p.II, 34

Philadelphia. Having previously announced the death of Franklin's worthy brother [Peter], must now inform him of the death of his widow; nothing to hinder him now from embracing Franklin's generous offer to put him into a printing office in London. Is going to resign the post-office to Mr. Thos. Foxcroft; intends working with Mr. Hall until he hears from Franklin. Mrs. Franklin having left no will, her promise to leave him the little sho possessed is of no value.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 35. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 August 27A.L.S. 3p.II, 35

New York. His son's sickness and his own ill health. Holt's promise to pay him on the first of next month not to be depended on. Every farthing of his allowance goes in the necessaries of life; wishes his salary as Comptroller could be made more nearly adequate to his services. Very little stationery sold in his shop; too much competition. Benny Mecom generous in promises but never in payments.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 37. Tissington, Anthony.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 August 30A.L.S. 2p.II, 37

Alfreton. Trust Franklin's German tour was pleasing to himself and useful to Sir J. Pringle. Account of his wife's recent illness. Hopes he has received his paper on Mineral Customs. Desires a visit from Franklin.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 36. Wharton, Samuel, 1732-1800.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 August 30A.L.S. 1p.II, 36

Philadelphia. Introducing Dr. Jonathan Potts, son of Franklin's friend, John Potts. Esq., who goes to Europe to continue his studies in medicine.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

XLII, 5. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 AugustA.L.S. 1p.XLII, 5

Philadelphia. Introducing Jonathan Potts.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 38. Sturgeon, William, 1722-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 September 1A.L.S. 1p.II, 38

Philadelphia. His health so poor that he has been obliged to retire into the country. The mission of Burlington being left vacant by the death of Mr. Campbell, asks Franklin to intercede with the Society on his behalf.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 39. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 September 11A.L.S. 4p.II, 39

New York. Thinks Holt a villain; is now applying to a lawyer to suc him. Both his boys sick. Times unfavorable for printing a newspaper. Hot summer; sickness prevalent. Engaged in printing an almanac. Complains of his salary as Land-Waiter; no chance of promotion. Expense of living in New York; doctor's bills,etc. Temper of Benny Mecom and Mr. Holt as compared with his own. Reported death of his nephew at Cape Fear. Inconsistency in being afflicted with gout and poverty. Troubles of his friend, Hughes.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

II, 41. Penn, Ann.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 September 16A.L.S. 1p.II, 41

Dublin. Writes instead of her son, Springett, who has been very ill, but is now recuperating in the country. Hopes Franklin has recovered from his late fatigue and indisposition.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 40. Walker, Hannah Farrow.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 September 17A.L.S. 2p.II, 40

Westbury. Acknowledging favor of 13th [name of month torn out]. Sorry to hear of his loss; promises to be frugal and industrious. Intense gratitude for past and present favors. Begging his acceptance of some small offerings for himself and Mrs. Stevenson.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 42. Priestley, Joseph, 1733-1804.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 September 21A.L.S. 3p.II, 42

Warrington. Relating to a History of Electricity, which he is writing. Curious experiments with an electrified chain.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 273).

XLIII, 159. Committee of American Merchants.
to Benjamin Franklin
[1766 September or December] 29L. in 3d P. 1p.XLIII, 159

Monday, London. Requesting Franklin to attend their meeting at Kings Arms, Cornhill.

General physical description: L. in 3d P. 1p.

XLII, 13. Kent, Benjamin, 1708-1788.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 [September]A.L.S. 2p.XLII, 13

Boston. A new cure for the gout. Would like to see Dr. Franklin commissioned as Governor of Massachusetts Bay.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 43. Franklin, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 11A.L.S. 1p.II, 43

Lutterworth. Expressing deep appreciation of Franklin's kindness to himself and daughter; overjoyed to hear of the latter's convalescence; thanks Mrs. Stevenson for her extraordinary goodness to her.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 44. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 11A.L.S. 4p.II, 44

New York. No settlement with Holt. Obstacles in the way of publishing a newspaper. Had the wettest summer ever remembered; universal sickness and distress, especially in his own family; his expenses more than his income. Asks once more if his allowance in the post-office cannot be enlarged a little. "A little more struggling through life will probably carry him out of it."

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

II, 45. Potts, Jonathan, 1745-1781.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 22A.L.S. 1p.II, 45

Liverpool. Letters Franklin will receive introducing the writer and his friend, Mr. Benjamin Rush; requesting him to write to any gentlemen in Edinburgh in their favor.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 46. Ronayne, Thomas.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 22A.L.S. 3p.II, 46

Cork, Ireland. Acknowledging favor of April 20th, with his book on Whirlwinds, Waterspouts, etc. Describes various electrical experiments.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 47. Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 22A.L.S. 2p.II, 47

Liverpool. Has procured some letters of introduction from Franklin's friends in Pennsylvania, whose import, he hopes, will gain Franklin's favor for him; begs him to write to such of his friends in Edinburgh on behalf of his friend Mr. Potts and himself as will be most useful to them in the prosecution of their studies. Franklin's merit and learning held by him in high esteem.

General physical description: A.L.S. 2p.

II, 48 (OS). Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 25A.L.S. 3p.II, 48 (OS)

New York. No prospect of bringing Holt to settlement; has therefore started a newspaper; small number of subscribers. Continual sickness and distress in his family. Expense of living. Question of having his salary increased. His accounts with Holt and B. Mecom. Electrical machine in his store-house; Mr. Hughes will not take it until he can pay for it. Lewis Jones has left his service to become a flogger and drummer in the army.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 50. Dick, Alexander, Sir, 1703-1785.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 28A.L.S. 1p.II, 50

Prestonfield. Acknowledging his favor of 11th inst. Expressing gratitude on behalf of his friend Mr. Swinton for Franklin's great kindness to him. Lord Kames's admiration for Franklin; great accession to his estate by the death of Lady Kames.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 49. Galloway, Joseph, 1731-1803.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 October 28A.L.S. 4p.II, 49

Philadelphia. News of a change of Ministry received with real concern; fears that it will prevent a change of Government; asks Franklin's opinion. Chief Justice declared publicly in the House that Secretary Conway had rebuked Franklin when he applied for a hearing on the petitions, and assured him that they were laid aside by His Majesty never to be resumed; does not believe this but would like the power to deny it. Uneasy about their poor friend H., who, owing to his having written many indiscreet things, is much disliked by both parties; wishes means could be found to raise him above the malice of his unrelenting enemies. The last election a complete victory; new mode of electing approved by both parties; prevents perjury and fraud. Joseph Wharton sends kindly remembrances.

General physical description: A.L.S. 4p.

LXVIII, 67. Johnson, Joseph, 1738-1809.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 November 41 p.LXVIII, 67

Sends those manuscripts for his inspection by order of Dr. Priestley who will esteem himself much obliged to the Dr. for looking over them as soon as possible.

II, 51. Monchy, François-Willem de, 1749-1796.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 November 4A.L.S. 1p.II, 51

Rotterdam. Acknowledging his favor of the 23d ult. Questions concerning a fire-engine. Compliments to Sir John Pringle.

General physical description: A.L.S. 1p.

II, 53. Parker, James, 1714-1770.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 November 11A.L.S. 3p.II, 53

New York. Acknowledging favor of Sept. 1st. Nothing has prospered with him. Continual sickness in his family. No news of his son since he went to sea in a small schooner ten weeks earlier bound for North Carolina. Poor success he has met with in printing his almanac and his newspaper. Lewis Jones has repented and returned to him. H.Hughes is a Son of Liberty and is greatly displeased with his brother and Franklin, whom he will believe favors the Stamp Act. Holt grown popular by his appearance against the Act.

General physical description: A.L.S. 3p.

II, 52. Wharton, Thomas, 1730-1782.
to Benjamin Franklin
1766 November 11A.L.S. 2p.II, 52