The Sol Feinstone Collection of the American Revolution, ca. 1760s-1850s

Mss.B.F327

Date: Circa 1760s-1850s | Size: 27 Linear feet, Ca. 2500 items

Abstract

This rich collection of letters and documents, which was assembled by Sol Feinstone (1888-1980) over a period of fifty years, includes material on almost all notable Americans from before the Revolution to the 1850's, as well as prominent Europeans, and there are documents relating to military affairs. There are substantial groups of letters from: John Adams, Henry Dearborn, Alexander Hamilton, Jedediah Huntington, Thomas Jefferson, Lafayette, George Washington, and a long run of letters from a Massachusetts military surgeon named Samuel Adams. Many letters, though written by Revolutionary figures, relate to events that occurred before or after the War.

Collection Information

Physical description

Ca. 2500 items, 27 linear feet.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Use:

Citation information: Sol Feinstone Collection of the David Library of the American Revolution at the American Philosophical Society

Provenance

Deposited by the David Library, 1969.

Processing information

Basic information (Feinstone numbers, correspondents and dates) from the printed guide was entered into the online finding aid in 2011 by Ann Reinhardt. There are no manuscripts with the Nos. 1743-1800.

Alternate formats available

This collection is also available on microfilm (Rhistoric Publications, 1969; 5 reels, Film 1274).

Other finding aids

A guide to the collection with detailed descriptions of items is available in the Library and on the website of the David Library of the American Revolution: http://www.dlar.org/pdf/Feinstone.pdf

Conservation Treatment

The entire collection was rehoused in acid-free material by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts in 2009-2010.

Naval History Note

The David Library Collection includes miscellaneous letters of high interest pertaining to all aspects of the American Revolution, including naval concerns. Among topics covered are privateers and privateering, prize cases, the British and Continental Navies, and the United States Navy and Marine Corps. There are also letters from John Barry, Francois-Joseph-Paul comte de Grasse, John Paul Jones, and Sir Richard Howe.

Early American History Note

The Sol Feinstone Collection of the David Library contains a wide array of original documents relating especially to the American Revolution. The collection is particularly strong in military affairs and contains a variety of original letters from generals and prominent officers from both British and American forces. The collection has a notable number of items relating to George Washington and his family, including a deed from 1604 to Laurence Washington that contains an original seal from James I.

In addition to the more well-known letter writers, the collection also houses significant letters, proclamations, and other records that offer insight into the social and political effects of the American Revolution. Of particular note are a series of letters from Samuel Adams Jr., son of Sam Adams and a medical officer in the Continental Army, which recount his experience. There is also a report on a woman in New Jersey who disguised herself as a man and enlisted in the militia, only to be discovered. There are also numerous letters from the early federal period which capture ratification debates and the history of the first congress.

Because Feinstone was from the Pennsylvania area, the Collection contains additional documents on Pennsylvania history, such as detailed sketches of wagons that operated in the 1770s and various land records.

The Collection has a detailed printed guide with an index.

Indexing Terms


Genre(s)

  • Family Correspondence
  • General Correspondence
  • Military Records
  • Miscellaneous
  • Official Government Documents and Records
  • Political Correspondence
  • Printed Material

Geographic Name(s)

  • New Jersey -- History -- 1775-1865.
  • New Jersey -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775.
  • United States -- Armed Forces -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783.
  • United States -- History -- 1775-1865.
  • United States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775.
  • United States -- History, Military.

Occupation(s)

  • Presidents.
  • Statesmen.

Personal Name(s)

  • Adams, John, 1735-1826
  • Adams, Samuel
  • Dearborn, Henry, 1751-1829
  • Feinstone, Sol,1888-1980,colle
  • Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804
  • Huntington, Jedediah, 1743-1818
  • Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826
  • Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis de, 1757-1834
  • Washington, George (1732-1799)

Subject(s)

  • American Revolution
  • Business and Skilled Trades
  • Colonial Politics
  • Colony and State Specific History
  • Diplomatic History
  • Early National Politics
  • Military History
  • Pennsylvania History


Detailed Inventory

Correspondence
  
No. 1 New Jersey
1776 November-1777 March6 p.

"An account of money in the hands of sundry persons taken to purchase cloathing"; includes references to types of clothing gathered and to whom they were delivered, and a notation for "Hospital at Springfield."


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey; Springfield (Union County, N.J.)

Subject(s): Quartermasters; Logistics; Clothing

No. 2 Rev. Samuel Auchmuty to John Montresor
1775 April 152 p.

Cites an extract of a letter Auchmuty received from London, 4 March 1775, that expressed approval of the proceedings of the [New York) Assembly and the [Anglican] clergy and that also pointed out that Lord [Frederick] North's resolution regarding taxation "proposes to the Colonies all They can Reasonably ask"; mentions troop transports that sailed from England and comments: "Where are Your Congresses Now? What say Hancock, Adams and all their Rebellious followers? Are they Still Bold. I Trow not"; informs him that "a Rascally Whig Mob" in New York rescued "Sears the King" [Isaac Sears] at the jail door and complains that "Our Magistrates have not the Spirit of a Louse."

Other Descriptive Information: Copy


Geographic Name(s): London, England

Subject(s): Taxation

No. 3 John Adam to [William] Livingston
1782 January 282 p.

Complains about the violation of a flag of truce, expresses fear about the consequences of the violation, and urges that the rights of flags be upheld.


Subject(s): Law of the Sea

No. 4 John Adams to Abigail Adams
1782 December 41 p.

Dissuades her from joining him in Europe and informs her that today he wrote his resignation to Congress and will return home as soon as he receives an acceptance, and also that their son [John Quincy Adams] is now traveling from St. Petersburg, [Russia] and will accompany him home.

Other Descriptive Information: "Fourth Copy"


Geographic Name(s): Saint Petersburg (Russia)

Subject(s): Diplomacy

No. 5 John Adams to Thomas Boylston Adams
1795 April 262 p.

Admits to having suffered from ennui when in Europe but mentions that he found relief in books; gives advice about purchasing books, learning French, and exercising; expresses interest in the new Dutch constitution but fears that "Franklinianism," "Turgotism," and "Nedhamism" will prevail and expresses hope that a spirit of intolerance in political discussions will not appear in the Netherlands; expresses hope for peace in France so that the nation can form a constitution for itself.

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm.


Geographic Name(s): France; Netherlands

Subject(s): French Revolution; Constitution; Education; Books

No. 6 John Adams to Caroline Amelia DeWint
1820 January 241 p.

Discusses inoculation and the "accidental discovery" of Dr. [Edward] Jenner, points out that one hundred years ago Adams's uncle [Zabdiel] Boylston introduced inoculation in America, and comments on human ignorance; gives grandfatherly advice.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

Subject(s): Inoculation; Vaccination; Vaccines

No. 7 John Adams to Edme Jacques Genet
1778 July 122 p.

Discusses false rumors that commissioners appointed by Congress will meet with the British peace commissioners [the Carlisle peace commission]; informs him that Adams and his colleagues agree that the treaty [of alliance with France] should be printed as soon as the King [Louis XVI] thinks proper, but not without the latter's knowledge; complains that the British "are doing all they can to confound the Distinctions between Truth and Falsehood, and to make a Lye to be respected as much as the Truth."

Other Descriptive Information: Partly illegible


Geographic Name(s): France

Subject(s): Treaties; Negotiation; Diplomacy

No. 8 John Adams to Edme Jacques Genet
1778 August 11 p.

Discusses an enclosed law [not present]; congratulates him on the news that [Charles-Henri-Theodat], comte d'Estaing sailed from Brest, [France] and remarks that it is a "decisive Event"; requests that in future he write in French because at present Adams wishes to read everything in French


Geographic Name(s): France

Subject(s): Law; France. Marine; France. Navy

No. 9 John Adams to Edme Jacques Genet
1778 June 84 p.

Encloses newspapers [not present] so that he can select items for Affaires de l'Angleterre et de l'Amerique; discusses two letters Adams wrote in 1775 that were published in [John Almon's] Remembrancer, comments that the history of the war has been "a Completion of the Prophecies contained in them," and points out that another series of Adams's letters in the Remembrancer refute accusations that the Americans "concealed our Designs of Independency, and professed to have no such Designs."

Other Descriptive Information: Partly illegible


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 10 John Adams to Edme Jacques Genet
1778 December 111 p.

Encloses two private letters [not present) and requests their return; informs him that [Thomas] Cushing and [John) A[very],[ Jr.], "are both of the [Massachusetts] Council, and very respectable Characters."


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 11 John Adams to Jean Luzac
1781 December 134 p.

Informs him that Adams intends to send copies of the new Dutch translation of "the American Constitutions" to the principal public libraries in America, mentions receiving copies of the new Dutch translation of the Massachusetts constitution, and expresses regret about his own inability to read a comparison of the latter with the Dutch constitution; comments on the future of America; encloses a letter [not present] from Gen. [Henry] Knox that does not give hope of possessing Charleston, [S.C.] this year; responds to his "friendly complaint" about relaying information for the "Leyden Gazette" [Gazette de Leyde] and discusses the problem of disseminating news.


Geographic Name(s): Charleston (S.C.)

Subject(s): Gazette de Leyde (Netherlands, Leiden); Netherlands

No. 12 John Adams to John Marshall
1806 July 172 p.

Assures him that Adams has no objection if Marshall inserts in his history [The Life of George Washington (1804-07)] letters that Adams wrote to General Washington, and remarks: "They were written under great Agitation of Mind, at a time when a cruel necessity compelled me to take measures which I was very apprehensive would produce the Evils which have followed from them"; comments that the last years of Washington's life are a period that must be investigated but will never be well understood, compares his own unfavorable situation as President with that of Washington's as commander-in-chief of the army, and points out that the latter was under the influence of [Alexander] Hamilton, "the most treacherous, malicious, insolent and revengeful Enemy"; comments that it will be difficult for posterity to believe that Adams was forced to appoint Washington commander-in-chief only "as an Engine to elevate Hamilton to the head of Affairs civil as well as military."


Geographic Name(s): Charleston (S.C.)

No. 13 John Adams to George Alexander Otis
1821 January 162 p.

Thanks him for his letters and for his translation of [Carlo Guiseppe Guglielmo] Botta [History of the War of the Independence of the United States of America (1821)] and comments on same; disagrees with Botta in portraying the American cause so often "in dangerous and desperate circumstances," especially the British plan [in 1777] to cut off communication between the Northern and Middle states, which "always appeared to me one of the weakest of all their plans."

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm.


Subject(s): Botta, Carlo, 1766-1837. Storia della guerra dell'independenza degli Stati Uniti d'America. English

No. 14 John Adams to Dr. Benjamin Rush
1809 February 202 p.

Points out that the Stoics and other philosophers preceded Dr. [Joseph] Priestley in the concept of the perfectability of the human mind; comments that no religious or political sect "ever carried their Jesuitical artifices to greater extravag_ than the late Faction of Atheistical Philosophers in France"; remarks that "Experimental is the only knowledge"; comments on the embargo.

No. 15 John Adams to Dr. Benjamin Rush
1813 April 182 p.

Expresses regret that Adams's sons and grandson expended their time as their father and grandfather did "in Diplomatick Dulness, where Knaves find fortune and honest Men Ruin"; comments that an act printed in [Benjamin] Ede's [Boston] Gazette, 13 Nov. 1775, regarding fitting out armed vessels to defend the coast of America is one of the most important documents in world history and the beginning of the destruction of Britain's domination of the sea; comments on a loan that was subscribed by [David] Parish and [Stephen] Girard; responds to a question in Rush's letter [of 10 April, regarding the present war]: "The Liberty of the Ocean is the Pretext, but the Power of the Union The Object."

No. 16 John Adams to Joseph Palmer
1776 April 23 p.

Expresses hope that [Francis] Dana will be appointed a judge or attorney general because he is well qualified; mentions the "rash Anger" of an old friend [Robert Treat Paine] and a quarrel with the latter about "some Important Points of Rank," which seems to have blown over; remarks that the evacuation of Boston is a great event, urges that the harbor be fortified, and argues that the Tories will prevail upon Britain to send another expedition against the town; points out that some people still expect British commissioners to treat with Congress and all demand that they grant a bill of rights; inquires how much powder was furnished to the Continental army from the Boston or the Massachusetts magazines and urges that the magazines be replenished.

Other Descriptive Information: Signature added from another manuscript


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 17 Peter Adams to Thomas Sim Lee
1780 January 71 p.

Order to pay Gen. [William] Smallwood "the State gratuity for value of him Recd."

No. 18 Samuel Adams, M.D. to Sally Preston Adams
1776-1781 

Microfilm target that describes the following thirty letters.

No. 19 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston
1776 March 101 p.

Friendly letter; signs himself "Medicus."

No. 20 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston
1776 March 261 p.

Mentions that his regiment was ordered into Boston and the prospect that it will remain there through the summer; expresses fear about contracting smallpox "as it is all around us"; remarks that "we have been and yet remain in somewhat of an unsettled and confused state"; signs himself "Medicus."


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

No. 21 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 October 52 p.

Informs her that his detachment returned to "Ti" [Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y.] but that he remained behind to care for the many sick; mentions that there is little expectation of engaging the enemy this season.


Geographic Name(s): Fort Ticonderoga

No. 22 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 October 82 p.

Informs her that many men are sick and many are "daily entering upon an endless eternity" and that approximately four hundred men have been buried from the hospital at Fort George since 1 July; informs her that he received orders to join his regiment at "Ti" [Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y.] and mentions that the latter place "is very Strong, both by nature & art"; mentions that there is little prospect of engaging the enemy this season and that the American fleet on Lake [Champlain] is formidable and much superior to the enemy's.


Geographic Name(s): Fort Ticonderoga

No. 23 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 October 142 p.

Describes the battle on Lake Champlain, remarks that two-thirds of the American fleet was destroyed and that they were "much deceived" about the enemy's strength, and mentions that although a powerful British army will arrive in a few days, the Americans are in good spirits and prepared to receive them.


Geographic Name(s): Champlain, Lake

No. 24 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 October 182 p.

Mentions hardships that he endured in traveling across Lake [Champlain] from Fort George, [N.Y.]; mentions that the troops have suffered from lack of a barracks but that they are now getting comfortable log houses; mentions that many men are sick.


Geographic Name(s): Champlain, Lake

No. 25 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 November 91 p.

Mentions that the British left Crown Point, [N.Y.] and expresses regret that the Americans did not have an opportunity "to chastise the insolence of [Sir Guy] Carleton, [John] Burgoyne, & their mercenaries"; compares the "doleful Wilderness" of Mount Independence three months ago with the "pleasant City" made by the soldiers; remarks that he does not regret coming to Mount Independence because "it has given me a good opportunity to improve in my profession, particularly in the branch of Surgery ."


Geographic Name(s): Crown Point, NY

No. 26 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1776 November 161 p.

Informs her that there is little news since the enemy departed from the neighborhood, that several regiments have left and will leave his post, and that his regiment will probably remain because they arrived recently; mentions that the weather has been very warm.

No. 27 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 June 72 p.

Friendly letter; mentions the route he traveled from Dorchester to Springfield; warns her to be careful about smallpox; mentions that the enemy remain in Philadelphia.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA; Springfield (Mass.)

Subject(s): Smallpox

No. 28 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 July 19, 203 p.

Informs her that Gen. [Henry] Knox ordered him to Englishtown to attend a wounded officer and mentions other wounded officers; describes the village of Englishtown and mentions that its situation makes fever and ague flourish and that the place is naturally poor and rendered poorer because the army encamped there a few days; informs her that he went to see two Tories executed at Monmouth Court House, [N.J.) "but they were turned off a few minutes before I arrived"; mentions the arrival of the French ambassador to Congress [Conrad Alexandre Gerard) and the arrival of the French fleet off Sandy Hook; expresses hope that the British will leave America in a few months and that each Continental regiment will be sent to its own state; [postscript): informs her that when the British marched through New Jersey they burned houses and plundered "without distinction of Whig or Tory" and remarks: "fine! encouragement for Tories."


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey

No. 29 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 August 54 p.

Friendly letter; mentions that he will soon go to camp at White Plains, [N.Y.] where he hopes to receive wages; mentions the "unparalleled barbarity and worse than Diabolical behavior of the Tories & Savages at Wyoming [Pa.]"; mentions "the Fruitless attempt of George's Commissioners" [the Carlisle peace commission] to bribe several members of Congress and remarks that it appears the British despair of conquering America by arms; mentions troops that moved from White Plains to Rhode Island and a report that the French fleet also went there; describes the High Dutch of Pennsylvania and mentions that "the women do most of the hard work"; informs her that he is now among a "clever" sort of people but still misses New England.


Geographic Name(s): White Plains, New York; Rhode Island

No. 30 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 August 192 p.

Friendly letter; mentions the route he traveled from Philadelphia to Englishtown.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 31 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 October 21 p.

Informs her that he expects that his regiment will go into winter quarters early, possibly on Dorchester Heights, [Mass.]; mentions skirmishes in which some American and some British lighthorse were captured.

No. 32 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1778 October 312 p.

Friendly letter; informs her that British troops embarked from New York supposedly bound for the West Indies and that it is doubtful whether the enemy will abandon New York this fall; points out that the American army is "considerably divided," gives the disposition of specified units, and mentions that "considerable detachments" were sent to guard the western frontier against Tories and Indians.


Geographic Name(s): New York (State)

No. 33 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 May 63 p.

Friendly letter; informs her that he sent a letter that enclosed a certificate and an order that will enable her to obtain money granted by the [Massachusetts] General Court; requests that she purchase a horse for him because they are expensive in his vicinity; mentions that the operations of the ensuing campaign are very uncertain and that many expect an attack on New York; postscript: "our Army is remarkably healthy."


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 34 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 May 151 p.

Requests that a captain purchase a horse for him; points out the difficulties involved in his returning home or in her visiting him.

No. 35 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 May 302 p.

Friendly letter; informs her that they expect to march soon and that "there is every prospect of a very active Campaign."

No. 36 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 August 112 p.

Friendly letter; mentions that "We live here Soldier like indeed"; mentions encouraging news from [Charles-Henri-Theodat], Count d'Estaing in the West Indies, in consequence of which [Sir Henry] Clinton is fortifying New York harbor and British troops left South Carolina and Georgia for the West Indies; mentions a report that the Americans captured all the enemy at Penobscot, [Me.] and expresses hope that the present campaign will end the war; encloses a certificate and order for money granted by the [Massachusetts] General Court.

No. 37 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 November 202 p.

Friendly letter; refers to West Point as a "doleful Nook"; mentions that most of the army is going into winter quarters in New Jersey, that the artillery park will again be at Pluckemin and that headquarters will be at Morristown, [N. J.]; informs her that the capture of British shipping in Georgia will compensate [Charles-Henri-Theodat], Count d'Estaing for his expedition; mentions a committee from the army to settle with the [Massachusetts] General Court for depreciation and remarks: "they must be convinced that they owe us Thousands"; postscript: mentions that many officers will soon be coming to Boston on furlough.


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey; West Point (N.Y.); Morristown (N.J.)

No. 38 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 December 22 p.

Friendly letter; remarks: "I fare harder here than I have ever done, at any place since the commencement of the War"; mentions that General Washington offered to bet thirty to one that peace will be established within six months; mentions that the troops are still in tents and that barracks and huts for winter quarters are yet to be built.

No. 39 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 December 93 p.

Mentions that he never fared so hard since the beginning of the war, describes his diet, and mentions observing a day of thanksgiving in accordance with a proclamation [of Congress, 20 Oct.]; informs her about reports that the combined fleets gave the British fleet "a severe drubbing" and that the British will soon abandon New York and remarks: "it is generally expected that we shall have a peace established by Spring."

No. 40 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1779 December 122 p.

Friendly letter; mentions hardships of camp life and also that the paymaster has not yet received any money; postscript: informs her about a report that a large embarkation is taking place at New York, supposedly destined for Georgia, and that in consequence General Washington ordered Virginia troops there.


Geographic Name(s): Virginia

No. 41 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 January 13 p.

Friendly letter; remarks that "use. . . has rendered my manner of living here much less disagreeable. . . than it was at my first arrival here"; [postscript]: "exceeding cold! ice makers were very busy last night."

No. 42 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 January 203 p.

Friendly letter; informs her about [William Alexander], Lord Stirling's raid on Staten Island, [N.Y.], [14-15 Jan.]; complains about lack of provisions and mentions that their daily allowance of bread is only three quarters of a pound, which they cannot always obtain.


Geographic Name(s): Staten Island (New York, N.Y.)

No. 43 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 March 212 p.

Remarks: "I. . . have got so well used to West-Point fare—which is coarse enough I assure you—that I begin to think myself a pretty good Soldier"; inquires about a doctor whose furlough expired; informs her that the troops are constantly on fatigue in preparation to receive the British, who are reported embarking to come up the [Hudson] River, and mentions a rumor that the British intend to leave New York.

No. 44 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 August 173 p.

Mentions the route he traveled from Milton to West Point; informs her that the only Continental troops at West Point are five companies of artillery and that the post is garrisoned by militia; remarks that "Continental money is growing better, people will sell anything for it" and expresses confidence that goods will become cheaper; informs her that all the surgeons at headquarters are resigning because Congress did not consider them in the depreciation and remarks that he will join them if their reasons are just.


Geographic Name(s): West Point (N.Y.)

No. 45 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 December 22 p.

Friendly letter; complains that he is destitute of money; informs her that the whole army moved into winter quarters and that the artillery park is to winter at New Windsor and mentions that he expects to have a hut built; [postscript]: "Unless Congress does something more for the medical department than they have yet, I shall not continue in service any longer than I can get money to leave it."

No. 46 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 December 122 p.

Informs her that he is "in a good house, among clever people," but that he lacks money and forage for his horse; remarks: "we get no pay yet but begin to hear a little talk of it."

No. 47 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1780 December 202 p.

Informs her that he has no money to send her and comments: "my present low circumstances is not a fault in me, but a consequence of serving my country"; mentions that his quarters are good and describes the family with whom he is quartered; informs her that most of the men are in huts, that the officers' huts are being built, and that there is "a very elegant Hut building which is to have a large hall in it for dancing, etc.!!!"

No. 48 Dr. Samuel Adams to Sally Preston Adams
1781 October 31 p.

Friendly letter; informs her that the loss of the British fleet was not equal to what was reported, that General Washington wrote very encouragingly about the capture of [Lord Charles] Cornwallis, and that Gen. [Nathanael] Greene reportedly had a "severe action" with the enemy [at Eutaw Springs, S.C.], captured many, but suffered considerable loss; expresses hope that "the present campaign will yet produce great things for us."

No. 49 Dr. Samuel Adams to Samuel Adams
1775 February 71 p.

Expresses esteem for his namesake, claims "some Sparks of the same Patriotick Spirit," and requests his opinion about public affairs; refers to a pamphlet that abused Massachusetts representatives to Congress as "The Gray Maggot" [Harrison Gray, The Two Congresses Cut Up (1774)] and mentions that it is held in contempt by most people; mentions suffering insults and threats from "those enemies of all righteousness the Tories."

No. 50 Samuel Adams to James Lovell
1778 March 313 p.

Mentions his own wish that a military school might be instituted in Boston; expresses satisfaction that [Gen. John] Burgoyne "seems to entertain proper Ideas of Congress"; expresses apprehension that "the just Expectations of the People with Regard to Ty and Independence [Forts Ticonderoga and Independence, N.Y.] will be baulked," that the cause will be injured, and that the people's confidence in officials will be lessened; discusses a prisoner exchange for Col. [Ethan] Allen; informs him that the [Massachusetts] General Assembly's instructions to Lovell regarding the Confederation are enclosed in Adams's letter to [Elbridge] Gerry and mentions Lovell's mortification at the delay; discusses the case of a man who claimed he was "surprised into an Oath of Allegiance."


Geographic Name(s): Fort Ticonderoga

No. 51 John Adlam to William Adair
1752 December 74 p.

Discusses problems of accounts and pay for soldiers and recruits and mentions that men deserted at Chignecto, [N.S.]; describes watchcoats needed by Gov. [Peregrine] Hopson's regiment; remarks that there is no communication between posts during the winter months because navigation is "always dangerous & frequently impracticable."

Other Descriptive Information: Duplicate

No. 52 William Alexander, Lord Stirling to James Abeel
1779 November 241 p.

Informs him that there are strong reasons to believe that an express rider employed in the Quartermaster department is passing counterfeit Continental money in New Jersey that he received from a "Villain" who brought it from New York and instructs him to communicate the information to Gen. [Nathanael] Greene and ask advice about apprehending the express rider.


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey; New York (State)

Subject(s): United States. Army. Quartermaster's Department

No. 53 William Alexander, Lord Stirling to the Chairman of the New York Committee of Safety (Pierre Van Cortlandt)
1776 March 181 p.

Stresses the importance to the safety of New York of all the artillery being complete in every detail, encloses a return [not present] of artillery, and points out that all the cannon below six-pounders "are in want of every Article."

No. 54 William Alexander, Lord Stirling to the Quartermaster General (Nathanael Greene)
1778 December 271 p.

Points out "The distressed Situation of this Army for Want of Forage" and directs him to procure forage "in the best Manner you can, and where you can," or to impress it for the usual price from each farmer "according to their Stock on Hand."

No. 55 William Alexander, Lord Stirling to ________
1765 February 233 p.

Friendly letter; encloses an account [not present] of lands remaining unsold in New Jersey that belong to the recipient's relatives, points out the "seeming paradox" that the lands decrease in value because they are "chiefly Pine Barrens or refuse pieces of the worst Mountains," remarks that "People in the Neighborhood of them, unrestrained, seem by habit of Stealing to have acquired a right to the wood & Range of Mr. Penn's Lands," and offers to purchase the land.


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey

Subject(s): United States. Army. Quartermaster's Department

No. 56 Colony of East Florida, Court of Vice Admiralty
1778 January 211 p.

Affidavit of William Alexander, agent for the captors of the sloop Hetty, that the annexed papers [not present] are all the papers found on board the vessel; sworn before Robert Catherwood.

No. 57 Frances Alsop to Evert Bancker, Jr.
1778 April 10, May 9, October 131 p.

Three receipts.

No. 58 American Philosophical Society to David Reddick
1789 January 171 p.

Certificate of membership; signed by B[enjamin] Franklin, David Rittenhouse, and others.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 59 Fisher Ames to John Lowell
1789 July 283 p.

Discusses the Judicial Bill, mentions that "It is a subject of great anxiety with those whom I associate with," and also mentions the Collection Bill and the Coasting Bill; informs him that the amendments to the Constitution were reported today and ordered to be printed; comments that the House of Representatives "is more decent than wise, has more moderation and patriotism than system and energy"; discusses the nomination of [William] Cushing and comments on the nomination process; remarks that the President's [George Washington's] "mode of conducting the executive business is very secret" and mentions that the senators are disappointed because "They expected to act more in quality of an executive council"; postscript: remarks that Gen. [Benjamin] Lincoln will be very useful to the new government and must not be given up to adversity and despair; comments that [James] Madison is a "timid" Federalist who will probably lead the attack on the Judicial Bill.

No. 60 John Anderson to Josias" Tobias Lear"
1794 January 62 p.

Mentions a canal between the Forth and the Clyde; mentions receiving news that yellow fever abated in Philadelphia; inquires about [Thomas] Pinckney's opinion regarding the British order to seize American cornmodities in American vessels if they are sent to any state with which Britain is now at war; requests information about books on the art of war; discusses artillery and his own "Air Recoil Check" invention.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

Subject(s): Yellow fever--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia

No. 61 Peter Anspach to David Wolfe
1793 January 171 p.

Encloses an extract [not present] of a letter from Col. [Timothy] Pickering to Anspach and discusses the settlement of his own claim.

No. 62 John Armstrong to the Treasurer of the United States (Thomas Tudor Tucker)
1805 June 191 p.

Draft drawn on the Treasury pursuant to a Convention between the United States and France of 30 April 1803.

Other Descriptive Information: "Duplicate"; printed form; bound in Sparks, Life of Washington, vol.5.


Geographic Name(s): France

Subject(s): United States. Department of the Treasury

No. 63 John Arndt to Joseph Reed
1781 May 121 p.

Informs him that Arndt discharged arrears due soldiers with the money Reed sent; inquires how money should be paid to new recruits since only Continental money is paid into the treasury.


Subject(s): United States. Department of the Treasury

No. 64 Benedict Arnold to Peggy" Margaret Mansfield Arnold"
1768 September 251 p.

Informs her about his arrival and about damage done to his vessel while going through Hell Gate and requests that she send a new jib; informs her that he sold his rum and requests that her father send him a hogshead of sugar "as Sugar sells Very well."

No. 65 Benedict Arnold to John Denny
1780 September 41 p.

Orders him to proceed with the boats under his command to Verplancks Point, [N.Y.], where he will receive further orders from Col. James Livingston, and instructs that under no circumstances are the men to be away from the boats but "have them ready both by day & night at a moments warning."

No. 66 Benedict Arnold to Dr. John Dickinson
1765 March 21 p.

Thanks him for sending a maid but informs him that Arnold has already engaged one; informs him that Arnold has credited Dickinson's account and sent specified articles.

No. 67 Benedict Arnold to John Graves Simcoe
1781 March 152 p.

Encloses letters [not present] and instructs him to inquire into the conduct of a captain who allegedly left his post to attack the Americans and also threatened to burn property, which is contrary to orders.

No. 68 Benedict Arnold to Jacob Thompson
1780 February 32 p.

Discusses an offer to buy Arnold's house using loan office certificates drawing interest in France and remarks that "the Money is daily depreciating as there is no probability of a regulation taking place."


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 69 Regarding Samuel Ashton
1804 March 306 p.

Description of a tract of land in Northumberland County belonging to Ashton, formerly the estate of Alexander Bartram, traitor, confiscated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; includes a copy of a statement of taxes paid on the property, 10 Sept. 1804, and copies of affidavits regarding the property by David McHenry, 6 July 1796, and by Robert Lyon, 8 July 1796.


Geographic Name(s): Pennsylvania

Subject(s): Taxation

No. 70 William Austin to John Barry
1786 April 72 p.

Informs him that Austin had an examination before the [Loyalist claims]commissioners and expects to be able to pay all his creditors and praises the "Bounty and goodness" of Britain for compensating those "who have suffer'd in their property's"; remarks that people complain about Nova Scotia without reason and describes the products of the country.

No. 71 Amos Avery, Andrew Huntington, and others, selectmen to Ephraim Herick
1781 March 151 p.eng

Order to pay Lt. Elias Brown in part for Abel Parker, "one of This Towns Six Month Man."


Subject(s): Huntington, Andrew, 1745-1824; Brown, Elias, 1793-1857

No. 72 William Axtell to Samuel Blachley
1779 April 161 p.

Informs him that by order of Gen. [Sir Henry Clinton], all prisoners on parole are denied the use of firearms "on any occasion whatever" and that all the latter are also to be in their quarters by ten o'clock at night during the summer.

No. 73 Loammi Baldwin to Mary Baldwin
1776 June 101 p.

Invoice of clothing, camp equipment, and other items belonging to Baldwin, colonel of the Twenty-sixth Regiment, Contintental Army

No. 74 Nisbet Balfour to the American militia prisoners aboard the prison ship Torbay
1781 May 176 p.

Complains about outrages committed on Loyalist militia prisoners by American troops and informs them that they will be held "as Hostages for the good usage of all the Loyal Militia, who are or may be made Prisoners of War" and that henceforth the treatment of American prisoners will be regulated by the treatment of Loyalist prisoners; includes a list of American militia prisoners aboard the Torbay, 18 May 1781.

Other Descriptive Information: Copy; see also no. 954

No. 75 John Banister to Theodorick Bland
1777 November 123 p.

Describes the battle of Germantown and gives British casualty figures; informs him that for three days past the enemy have cannonaded the American fort at Mud Island [Fort Mifflin] and comments on British objectives; remarks that Gen. [John] Burgoyne is in a "desperate situation" between Gen. [Horatio] Gates and Gen. [Benjamin] Lincoln and mentions that British reinforcements arrived in New York with which Gen. [James] "Robinson" [Robertson] plans to force his way up the "North" [Hudson] River and attempt a junction with Burgoyne.

No. 76 William Barber to Henry Jackson
1778 June1 p.

Expresses doubt that Barber will be promoted in his present regiment and requests a recommendation to Gen. [Henry] Knox for a commission in the artillery.

No. 77 John Barr to Edward Dunscomb
1782-17831 p.

Informs him that the reason Barr did not mention commutation in an order was because "I durst not.. . as they threaten me with a Mobb"; requests that he give Barr's certificates to the bearer of the letter.

No. 78 Henry Barry to All whom it may concern
1779 February 51 p.

Permit for William Cornell to carry a gun for fowling.

No. 79 State of Pennsylvania, Court of Admirality
1776 September 9 - November 191 vol.

Records of three cases before the court, George Ross, judge: John Barry and James Robinson vs. the sloop Betsy; John Paul Jones vs. brigantine Sea Nymph; and Wingate Newman vs. brig Polly; includes references to captured Negro slaves and copies of certifications by John Hancock and by John Murray, Lord Dunmore and Andrew Snape Hamond.

No. 80 William Barton to his father (Gilbert Barton)
1779 June 41 p.

Informs him that William Barton was sent from Easton, [Pa.] with a detachment to repair roads toward Wyoming, [Pa.] and that he is nearly finished building a bridge over Otters Creek; mentions that the regiment already marched to Wyoming and that it may proceed to Niagara or Detroit; remarks: "News I have none as the place is in a manner Uninhabited."

No. 81 William Barton to Benjamin Lawrence
1779 August 15, 172 p.

Informs him that the army left Wyoming, [Pa.] on 31 July and arrived unmolested at Tioga on II [Aug.] after "a very fetiaguing march. . . threw a most horrid country"; describes the razing of the Indian town of "Shamong" [Chemung, N.Y.], burning Indian cornfields, and skirmishes with the Indians.


Geographic Name(s): Wyoming County (Pa.)

No. 82 William Barton to ________
1778 November 172 p.

Informs him about an incident in which a woman masqueraded as a boy and enlisted in the army, was discovered "by Pulling out the Teats of a Plump Young Girl, which caused Great divertion," and then was drummed through the town "with the whores march."

No. 83 William Bayard. Port of New York.
1805 March 81 p.

Affidavit that eighty hogsheads of claret that were purchased by him and laden aboard a schooner are intended to be exported to Havana, [Cuba] and not be re-landed in the United States.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 84 Rev. Joseph Bean
1775 May 111 vol.

"A Fast Sermon, Preached. . . on a day that was kept as a Special fast, by advice of the [Massachusetts] provincial Congress, on account of the distresses of the present day."

No. 85 John Beckley to Dr. William Eustis
1804 July 172 p.

Comments on the "Punic warfare" between Britain and France; mentions the death of [Alexander] Hamilton in a duel and remarks that the Federalists are "an expiring faction"; comments that a few more years of peace "will seal the destiny of our republican systems, beyond the influence of foreign nations, empires, and principles."


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 86 John Beckley to ________
1793 June 22, 25, 27, July 1, 24 p.

Transmits information from [Jacob] Clingman that Andrew G. Fraunces implicated [Alexander] Hamilton and [William] Duer in speculation in treasury warrants and mentions that Fraunces claimed he could "hang Hamilton"; informs him that in consequence of [James] Reynolds's intrigue with Hamilton, [Aaron] Burr obtained a divorce for Mrs. [Maria] Reynolds and mentions that the latter is willing to testify about the intrigue; informs him about an interview that Hamilton had with Clingman on 25 June; suggests measures to be taken in order "to unravel this scene of iniquity."

No. 87 George Beckwith to ________
1779 October 171 p.

Informs him that Gen. [Wilhelm von] Knyphausen ordered that the recipient be parolled for five days in exchange for the parole of Lewis Vincent of East Chester, [N.Y.].

No. 88 Anthony Benezet to John Smith
n.d.1 p.

Complains that Smith [a Quaker] is absenting himself from his proper service for "unwarrantable Reasons."

No. 89 Asaph Bennet
1778 July 24-302 p.

Pay abstract for Bennet's company in Col. Archibald Kasson's regiment of Rhode Island militia; includes an oath and certification regarding same.


Geographic Name(s): Rhode Island

No. 90 John Beresford to ________
1779 June 243 p.

Informs him about a man who is a cheat and a swindler; informs him that people in London are roused [in response to the French alliance with the Americans] , that the militia is to be augmented, that both the East India Company and the city of London have offered bounties to seamen to enlist in the navy and will fit out warships, and that the nobility and gentry are all offering their services to raise corps; mentions that everyone is certain of an invasion but most expect it in Ireland and also mentions political matters involving Ireland; mentions a rumor that Sir Guy Carleton will take command; mentions that there are good letters from Virginia and the South "and good hopes of more Dissension among the Rebels."


Geographic Name(s): London, England; Virginia

No. 91 William M. Betts to the commanding officer at Fishkill
1780 September 101 p.

Requests that he furnish twenty men to repair fences surrounding the public pastures.


Geographic Name(s): Fishkill (N.Y.)

No. 92 Clement Biddle to Jeremiah Wadsworth
1779 November 92 p.

Discusses procuring grain and hay for a "considerable body" of lighthorse that are to be stationed near Danbury, Conn.; requests that he obtain the aid of the Connecticut legislature in procuring grain, forage, and the offal of all the wheat that is ground for flour in the state.


Geographic Name(s): Danbury (Conn.)

No. 93 Owen Biddle to Henry Hollingsworth
1780 June 301 p.

Transmits a copy [present] of a circular letter from Nathanael Greeneto Biddle, 30 June 1780, regarding a demand "like one of the Pope's Bulls'" from the Board of Treasury that the accounts of the [Quartermaster General's] department be brought in for settlement; [on address leaf]: a list of names of prominent officials.


Subject(s): United States. Army. Quartermaster's Department

No. 94 Ephraim Blaine to John Ladd Howell
1779 January 81 p.

Advises him to watch for supporting evidence regarding Howell's neighbors's conduct before it can be reported to Congress; informs him that because of ice in Chesapeake Bay and in the rivers, the demand for flour is very great, instructs him to procure all he can so that it can be transported to Trenton, [N.J.] when the Delaware River opens, and cautions him not to let speculators take advantage of the situation.


Geographic Name(s): Chesapeake Bay (Md. and Va.); Trenton (N.J.)

No. 95 Edward Blake
1778 May 192 p.

Muster roll and payroll of wages due men in Blake's company who marched from Taunton, [Mass.] on a "Secret Expedition" under Col. George Williams from 29 Sept. to 29 Oct. 1777; [on verso]: certification by George Godfrey, 19 May 1778, that the roll was made up agreeable to a resolution of the Massachusetts General Court.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 96 Massachusetts, Town of Boston, Committee of Correspondence to Samuel Robinson and others
1773 January 71 p.

Commends them on their votes and resolutions regarding "Deliverance from an ignominious Slavery"; signed by William Cooper, clerk.


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

No. 97 Massachusetts, Town of Boston, Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety to the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection, and Safety of the Town of Sandwich, Mass.
1777 February 273 p.

In order 'to prevent any misunderstanding by false Reports spread daily by the Tory Party," informs them about the transactions of the town regarding an act to prevent monopoly and oppression by fixing prices; signed by Jonathan Williams, [Sr.], chairman.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

No. 98 Massachusetts, Port of Boston and Charleston to the Inspector of the Port
1826 September 81 p.

Certification that D. Brown paid duties on six pianofortes imported from London and is granted permission to deliver the same; signed by Thomas Melvill, naval officer.


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.); London, England; Charleston (S.C.)

No. 99 Massachusetts, Inhabitants of Town of Boston to the town clerk of Haverhill, Mass.
1774 July 261 p.

Request the "aid and support" of the town of Haverhill in the face of two expected acts of Parliament [the Coercive Acts] "altering the course of justice, and annihilating our once free constitution of government"; signed by William Cooper, town clerk.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

Subject(s): Great Britain. Parliament

No. 100 Elias Boudinot
1799 November 51 p.

Certification that as agent and attorney for the earls of Perth, he examined papers relating to their business with Col. Joseph Barton and found that the latter fraudulently sold lands.


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey

No. 101 Elias Boudinot, Agent for James Drummond, Earl of Perth, and Rachael Drummond to Elijah Allen
1799 May 11 p.

Deed to 57 4/100 acres" in Newton, Sussex County, [N.J.]

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): New Jersey

No. 102 Elias Boudinot to Elbridge Gerry
1777 November 131 p.

Discusses the "ill Behaviour" and "great insolence" of two prisoners who were captured at Somerset, N.J.; informs him that a general prisoner exchange is being negotiated, "which ... might be accomplished if the most ungenerous acts were not used to prevent it and at the same time to cast the blame on us."


Geographic Name(s): York, PA

No. 103 Elias Boudinot to William Irvine
1801 May 231 p.

Requests that he send the profile of the President [Thomas Jefferson?] because the engraver needs it while he is engraving the dies.

No. 104 Elias Boudinot to Robert Morris
1781 February 71 p.

Requests that he obtain money for Boudinot on an enclosed bill of costs [not present] in a lawsuit.


Geographic Name(s): Hanover, NJ

No. 105 Ephraim Bowen to Elisha Reynolds Potter
1832 November 296 p.

Discusses his own plan to memorialize Congress for compensation for the depreciation of his pay and rations "during.. . Service in the Army of the Revolution" and requests that Potter use his influence in Congress to facilitate the memorial; includes Bowen's service record, his statement of monthly pay received from 1 Jan. 1777 to 31 Oct. 1780, and a scale of depreciation.

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy"


Geographic Name(s): Pawtuxet, RI

No. 106 Jacob Bower
1777-17791 vol.

Account book [of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment]; records debits and credits of money disbursed to specified officers and soldiers; includes references to Col. [Henry] Bicker, notations that some individuals deserted or were wounded, killed, or missing in action, and other miscellaneous notations.

No. 107 Matly Boyd to Benjamin Lawrence
1776 April 222 p.

Friendly letter; remarks: "I think our trublesum times is not likely to be over but reather inkress than Dekress"; informs him about companies of men who marched from Boyd's vicinity.

No. 108 Thomas Bradford to All concerned
1780 July 141 p.

Certification that John S. Jarvis of Antigua, [W.I.], a prisoner of war, is sent via St. Eustatius, [W.I.] in exchange for Sheftall Sheftall, formerly a prisoner of war in Antigua who is on parole in Philadelphia.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 109 William Bradford to the President Benjamin Franklin in Council of Pennsylvania
1788 January 141 p.

Points out that the publication of [Richard] Wells's memorial gave rise to some mistakes respecting Bradford's official duty [as attorney general] and requests permission to make public his own letters to the President and Council.

No. 110 Isaac Bradish
1783 May 31 p.

Account with Thomas Fearweather.

No. 111 Battle of Brandywine
1777 September 11 

Memorandum of the battle by an unidentified British writer; includes an "Examination of the [David] Dundass System, answered according to the practice of the 1st Batln. Light Inf[antr]y," and a memorandum on equipment, uniforms, and tactics.

Other Descriptive Information: See also no. 409 for another item by this writer


Subject(s): Brandywine, Battle of, Pa., 1777

No. 112 Edward Pelham Brenton
1810-18121 p.

Report on the defects of HMS Spartan.

No. 113 George Brodie
1780 September 201 p.

Parole of a British officer who is under the Convention of Saratoga.

No. 114 John L. Bronck, and six others
1782 April 23-1792 September 171 p.

Oath of allegiance to the state of New York; includes the date each oath was sworn.

No. 115 Benjamin Brooks
1799 July2 p.

Return of troops under his command in garrison at Fort McHenry, [Md.], Fort Mifflin, [Pa.], and Fort Jay, Bedloe's Island, and West Point, [N.Y.].


Geographic Name(s): West Point (N.Y.)

No. 116 Andrew Brown to Henry Jackson
1777 July 301 p.

Gives instructions for mustering Jackson's regiment.


Geographic Name(s): Cambridge, Mass

No. 117 Andrew Brown to Henry Jackson
1777 August 271 p.

Informs him that for convenience he intends to muster Jackson's regi ment on the first Monday of every month and gives instructions regarding the muster.


Geographic Name(s): Cambridge, Mass

No. 118 Gawen Brown, Jr. to Henry Jackson
1778 September 82 p.

Gives reasons for wanting to resign from Jackson's regiment and requests a certificate of non-indebtedness to the regiment that Brown will forward to General Washington along with his request for permission to resign.


Geographic Name(s): Providence, RI

No. 119 Gawen Brown, Jr. to Henry Jackson
1778 September 181 p.

Reiterates his request for a certificate of non-indebtedness to the regiment so that he can resign from the army and requests that his furlough be extended.


Geographic Name(s): Pawtuxet, RI

No. 120 Arthur Browne
1766 February 24-April 241 p.

An account of sixty days' subsistence for the [British] Twenty-eighthRegiment.


Subject(s): United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--British forces

No. 121 Arthur Browne
1766 October 25-December 241 p.

An account of sixty days' subsistence for the [British] Twenty-eighth Regiment.


Subject(s): United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--British forces

No. 122 Arthur Browne to Robert Leake
1766 October 252 p.

Receipt for provisions (8510 1/2 rations) issued to the [British] Twenty-eighth Regiment for the period 25 June to 24 Oct. 1766.


Geographic Name(s): New York

Subject(s): United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--British forces

No. 123 Arthur Browne to the Contractors for Victualling His Majesty's Forces in North America
1766 August 51 p.

Receipt for provisions (11,545 rations) issued to the [British] Twenty-eighth Regiment for the period 25 May to 24 June 1766.


Geographic Name(s): New York

Subject(s): United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--British forces

No. 124 James Bruce to George Turner
1779 June 252 p.

Warrant to pay subsistence money to the paymaster of the [British] Seventieth Regiment for the period 25 June to 24 Aug. 1779.


Geographic Name(s): Halifax, NS

Subject(s): United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--British forces

No. 125 Peter Bryan Bruin to Henry Jackson
1778 October 51 p.

Informs him about an impending duel between a lieutenant in Jackson's regiment and an inhabitant of Providence and transmits Gen. [John] Sullivan's order that he prevent it: "If persuasion fails, Force must be adopted."


Geographic Name(s): Rhode Island

No. 126 Peter Bryan Bruin to Henry Jackson
1778 October 61 p.

Transmits an invitation from Gen. [John] Sullivan to dine aboard the guardship and requests that Jackson bring his band.


Geographic Name(s): Rhode Island

No. 127 Peter Bryan Bruin to Henry Jackson
1778 October 261 p.

Transmits Gen. [John Sullivan's] wish that one gill of rum be issued to every man in Jackson's detachment.


Geographic Name(s): Rhode Island

No. 128 Peter Bryan Bruin to Henry Jackson
1778 November 61 p.

Requests that he provide music for a dance at a "Country Seat" near Providence: "You are in great measure essential to our Pleasure."


Geographic Name(s): Rhode Island

No. 129 James Bruyn to Edward Dunscomb
1783 July 101 p.

Encloses an account [not present] with the United States and requests that he use it in a settlement; informs him that nearly all the officers in the vicinity of Kingston executed an instrument [related to commutation] and expresses the opinion that Dunscomb will not be able to do anything for officers who were prisoners of war because of "some delinquency in the Commissary of Prisoners."


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 130 Matthew Buchanan to the Pennsylvania Committee of Safety
1776 March 121 p.

Petition by one "bred to the Sea Service" for appointment as a lieutenant "to attend the Fire Rafts, or to serve in the Floating Battery"; includes his record of maritime experience.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 131 Ebenezer Buck to David Kelley
1778 August 241 p.

Remarks that the price of goods at home is so high the army mightbe disbanded; mentions that in general the army is healthy; informs himthat they often have skirmishes with the enemy in the vicinity of Kings 25 Bridge, [N.Y.] and that men desert to both armies so that "I believe we keep about even with them"; informs him about a report of a large reinforcement joining the British in New York in order to force the American lines; informs him that three specified brigades are marching to Newport, [R.I.] and mentions that the whole army is anxious to hear from there; mentions that the army may attempt to rout the enemy out of New York.

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment; typescript transcription on microfilm


Geographic Name(s): Newport (R.I.)

No. 132 Timothy Taylor
1786 October 101 p.eng

Certification that John Buckman, Jr., yeoman, of Newtown Township, Bucks County, subscribed to the affirmation of allegiance as directed by the act of the Pennsylvania General Assembly of 4 March 1786.


Subject(s): Bucks County (Pa.)

No. 133 John Burgoyne to Horatio Gates
1777 October 91 p.

Commits to Gates's protection Lady Harriet "Ackland" [Acland], whose husband, Maj. [John Dyke] Acland, was wounded and is a prisoner.

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy"


Geographic Name(s): Saratoga, NY

No. 134 John Burgoyne to Lord George Germain
1777 October 2028 p.

Gives a detailed description of the Saratoga campaign and his own capitulation to Gen. Horatio Gates; includes copies of eight letters between Burgoyne and Gates, 13-16 Oct. 1777, relating to the capitulation, and also the minutes of the British council of war, 12 Oct. 1777.

Other Descriptive Information: "Duplicate"

No. 135 William Heath to John Burgoyne
1778 March 282 p.

Informs him that accounts will be examined, that Heath will not unnecessarily delay his departure, and that a vessel may be procured to carry a captain to Halifax, [N.S.].

Other Descriptive Information: Copy


Geographic Name(s): Boston, MA

No. 136 Edmund Burke to John King
1796 October 273 p.

Discusses the management of an estate in trust.


Geographic Name(s): London, England

No. 137 John Burke to Dr. John Morgan
1783 August 123 p.

Friendly letter; informs him that [Rev. Jacob] Duche was appointed chaplain of an [orphan] asylum in England "but his heart like the magnet perpetually points to North America, and he rather considers his present situation as a banishment, than a desirable establishment"; mentions that people in Antigua approve very much of the peace with America; remarks 26 that "War is certainly the time to make money in the West Indies, if an island escape from capture" and mentions that "the admiralty practice" benefited Burke considerably; comments that the treaty of peace is not honorable but is as good as could be expected; postscript: acknowledges his approval of Burke's pamphlet "which I flatter myself has done some good here."

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm


Geographic Name(s): Antigua, WI

No. 138 Aaron Burr
1796 August 31 p.

Check drawn on the U[nited) S[tates] B[ank], Office of Discount and Deposit.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form; bound in A Collection of the Facts and Documents, Relative to the Death of Major-General Alexander Hamilton [1804]


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 139 Aaron Burr, on behalf of Alexander Henry
1787 May2 p.

Plea in the lawsuit for debt of Neil Gilligan vs. Alexander Henry; filed 6 Nov. 1787.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 140 Aaron Burr to Thomas Jefferson
1801 June 41 p.

Encloses [Ephraim] Kirby's letter [not present], since information in it pertains more to Jefferson than to himself.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 141 Aaron Burr to Gurdon W. Lathrop
1815 March 301 p.

Discusses legal matters; remarks regarding a disclosure in Burr's last letter: "I shall enjoy much more ease & more independence then than now & propose to myself a more chearful life."


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 142 Aaron Burr to Jeremiah Wadsworth
1779 August 152 p.

Discusses forwarding letters to Burr's "Jersey Correspondents" by the safest means; mentions his own ill health and that he remains at Middletown "for the Convenience of bathing"; informs him that Burr has left the army and expresses a desire to settle accounts; mentions malice aimed at Wadsworth and remarks: "Conscious Innocence will generally secure a Man from the Mortifications of Calumny but the same Course will also make him more sensible of, and more justly incensed at, the Injury offered him"; inquires about "the petty politicks of our friends."

No. 143 Aaron Burr to Joseph Wheaton
1806 April 221 p.

Expresses regret about the fate of [John?] Archer; comments that [Rufus] King's bill "is certainly a little a la Washington"; mentions that his own movements will be determined by the arrival of letters from Washington, D.C.; [postscript]: "I could prove in any court of law that that signature is a forgery."


Geographic Name(s): Washington (D.C.)

No. 144 Aaron Burr to ________
March 271 p.

Complains about delay in receiving letters; instructs him to tell a woman not to give up possession of anything; [postscript]: suggests that he use darker ink when writing "for the reading costs me too much."

Other Descriptive Information: Partly illegible


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 145 Pierce Butler to John Ross
1799 August 81 p.

Discusses financial matters.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 146 Thomas Butler to Isaac Craig
1796 June 212 p.

Order to issue material and thread for a flag for the garrison at Fort Fayette, [Pa.) and also for musket powder to prime the cannon; [on verso]: receipt for same.

No. 147 Thomas Butler to John Bradstreet
1756 May 202 p.

Receipt for pay of Indians who were sent by Sir William Johnson to serve as scouts for the bateau men on their first trip to Oswego, [N.Y.] in April 1756.

No. 148 Colony of New York
1775-17761 p.

Warrant to distrain goods for non-compliance with militia regulations.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form, blank


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 149 Francis Cabot, Jr. to Samuel White
1780 February 232 p.

Requests payment of interest due on a bond; complains that "repeated losses since the cursed Penobscot Expedition has very much diminished my Finances" and mentions that a brigantine in which Cabot has an interest was.captured by a British frigate; congratulates him on the safe arrival of his ship.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusettes

Subject(s): Penobscot Expedition, 1779

No. 150 Alexander Cain
1781 September 271 p.

Bill of lading for merchandise shipped by James Moylan to John Brown in Philadelphia.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): L'Orient, France; Philadelphia, PA

No. 151 James Thomson Callender to William Young
1797 April 82 p.

Discusses the settlement of a debt for printing paper and mentions having given Young copies of the second part of The Political Progress of Britain [1795]; includes related notations on address leaf.

No. 152 Charles-Alexandre Calonne to M. Ribart
1764 May 13 p.

Requests monthly reports on operations and the causes of delays and difficulties in mapping a river basin; encloses a copy [not present) of a directive from [Charles-Henri-Theodat, comte] d'Estaing to [Antoine-Jean-Louis?] Du Portal that assigns a cartography mission to Ribart; encloses a letter [present] of encouragement from Du Portal in which Calonne requests any further details in the form of a memorandum.

Other Descriptive Information: In French


Geographic Name(s): Au Cap, France

No. 153 Francisco Luis Hector, Baron de Carondelet to ________
1794 July 61 p.

Encloses a copy of a royal memorandum [not present] regarding "los nitios expositos" (the foundlings).

Other Descriptive Information: In Spanish


Geographic Name(s): New Orleans, LA

No. 154 Charles Carroll, of Carrollton to William Gibbons
1823 January 22, 243 p.

Discusses delivering flour to a factory and to town.

No. 155 Charles Carroll, of Carrollton to Henry Hollingsworth
1776 July 121 p.

Requests that he send four hundred bayonets of different-sized sockets for the Eastern Shore militia who are to comprise part of the Flying Camp.

No. 156 Charles Carroll, of Carrollton to the cashier of the Office of Discount and Deposit
1826 May 231 p.

Order to pay his grandson Charles Carroll.

No. 157 Robert Carter to Thomas Hooper
1722 July 32 p.

Warrant to survey five hundred acres in Stafford County, [Va.] for Joseph Waugh; returned 19 Feb. 1722/23.

No. 695 James Knowles to his wife
1776 January 152 p.

Comments that he is "much Chagreen'd by the late Repulse which our Troops have met with" and that the attack on Quebec was "a desparate push which cost too many Brave Men," but expresses confidence that eventually the Americans will take possession of the city; expresses regret over the loss of captured and killed fellow-officers; mentions that he is in good quarters and well clothed; mentions Col. [Benedict] Arnold.

Other Descriptive Information: Copy.


Geographic Name(s): Quebec, Canada

No. 696 Regarding Henry Knox
1806?4 p.

A brief account of Knox's birth and his career from the Revolutionary war until his death on 25 Oct. 18°6.

No. 697 Henry Knox to Ralph H. Bowles
1790 September 291 p.

Informs him that Knox will submit Bowles's claim for employment to the President [George Washington].

Other Descriptive Information: Bound in Sparks, Life of Washington, vol. 5.


Geographic Name(s): Boston, MA

No. 698 Henry Knox to John Cochran
1792 August 132 p.

Transmits his own warrant [not present] for the payment of invalid pensioners of New York State and gives instructions about same.

No. 699 Henry Knox to John Gleason
1804 April 101 p.

Gives instructions about drawing up a deed.


Geographic Name(s): Boston, MA

No. 700 Henry Knox to Samuel Hodgdon
1794 February 111 p.

Requests information on the cost per ton for casting heavy twenty-four and thirty-six-pound cannon and for casting cannon balls for same.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 701 Henry Knox to Samuel Hodgdon
1797 October 253 p.

Apologizes for not being able to extinguish his own debts and mentions selling tracts of land to satisfy.demands.

No. 702 Henry Knox to Henry Jackson
1781 November 152 p.

Suggests that he ask [David] Cobb and [Samuel] Shaw for a "Journal of the Siege" [of Yorktown, Va.]; mentions that Lucy [Flucker Knox] and their son are at Mount Vernon; informs him about the recent death of [Martha] Washington's only child, [John Parke] Custis; includes a list of names on address leaf.


Geographic Name(s): Mount Vernon (Va. : Estate)

No. 703 Henry Knox to William Knox
1792 May 251 p.

Instructs him to deliver equipment to Gen. [Anthony] Wayne's servant and to charge the latter the purchase price.

No. 704 Henry Knox to the Secretary of War James McHenry
1798 August 55 p.

Points out that [Alexander] Hamilton and [Charles Cotesworth] Pinckney, who were subordinate in rank to Knox during the Revolutionary war, were given priority on the list of major generals, and requests clarification of the rules regarding rank before he will accept the appointment.

No. 705 Henry Knox to Isaac Winslow
1785 September 54 p.

Discusses the settlement of a boundary dispute; discusses the market for and the quality of lime; informs him about domestic matters.

No. 706 Henry Knox to ________
October 131 p.

Discusses sending clothing and shoes by stage wagon to the Virginia troops at Fort Cumberland, [Md.].


Geographic Name(s): Virginia

No. 707 Robert Knox
1781 December 42 p.

Certification that Peter Anderson is "a Sea Faring Man" and does not come under militia law.

No. 708 Robert Knox to whom it may concern
1781 December 272 p.

Certification that James Frazier is unable to pay his militia fine and ought to be excused because he had "Very Sore Eyes" and was "Unfit for Duty."

No. 709 Tadeusz Andrzej Bonawentura Kosciuszko to John Armstrong
December 131 p.

Proposes that they dine together.

No. 710 Tadeusz Andrzej Bonawentura Kosciuszko to Nathanael Greene
1782 December 262 p.

Complains about lack of cooperation from owners of armed vessels and from the government [of South Carolina], remarks that "Public affairs Seams to be not very much at heart," and suggestsputting armed men aboard sloops that are intended as rice transports; gives the strength of enemy galleys; requests that a detachment of men be sent to Kosciuszko at Stono, [S.C.].

No. 1212 James Ridge to Sir John Bridges
1792 July 42 p.

Requests an explanation in person of the offensive words that Bridges used at a county meeting at Lewis on 4 July.

Other Descriptive Information: Draft; includes a notation, (n.d.), that the draft is in the handwriting of Thomas Paine.

No. 1213 William Ripley
1777 August 191 p.

Oath of enlistment in the Continental army until 10 Jan. 1778.

No. 1214 Rivington and Van Horne to James Rivington
1796 April 72 p.

Promissory note; endorsed by James Rivington.

Other Descriptive Information: Bound in Sparks, Lift of Washington, vol. 3. Promissory note; endorsed by James Rivington.


Subject(s): Promissory notes

No. 1215 Daniel Roberdeau
1762 January 121 p.

Account with Rev. "Charles Magnus Wrongle" [Carl Magnus Wrangle] from 19 Aug. 1760 to 7 July 1761.

No. 1216 James Robertson to Walter Rutherford
1777 December 41 p.

Expresses surprise that Rutherford was put in jail "for being inamical to America," informs him that although the commander-in-chief [Sir William Howe] wishes to relieve peaceable inhabitants in Rutherford's circumstances, he is determined not to exchange them for prisoners of war, and declines to confine "the friends of those who confined you."

No. 1217 Caleb Robinson
1782 May 91 p.

Abstract of musters in the New Hampshire Brigade for the period 25 April to 3 May 1782.


Geographic Name(s): New Hampshire

No. 1218 Donatien-Marie-Joseph de Vimeur, vicomte de Rochambeau to Les Ministres""
1795 April 22, May 92 p.

Two reports on British, American, and French troop movements in the Caribbean and on British attempts to stop trade in the Caribbean.

No. 1219 Jean-Baptiste de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau to M. de Morangis de St. Albon
1767 October 101 p.

Acknowledges support of de Morangis's promotion.

No. 1220 Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau to ________
1788 June 111 p.

Approves an official request for leave.

No. 1221 Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau to ________
1779 July 271 p.

Gives instructions about disciplinary action to be taken when accidents occur in target practice during military exercises.

No. 1222 Caesar Rodney to Thomas Rodney
1772 March 311 p.

Informs him that Caesar Rodney will soon sell Thomas Rodney's marsh and also that a man and wife are anxious to apprentice their son to the latter.

No. 1223 Caesar Rodney to Thomas Rodney
1776 May 82 p.

Urges him to oppose "Turbulent Spirits" and "Courtly Tyrants" who, in order to gain a seat in the House, attempt to make necessary regulations seem obnoxious to the people; informs him that all the gondolas left the fort to attack two British vessels at Newcastle; comments that "our (Much talk'd of) Commissioners [the Howe peace commission] are turned into Men of War and foreign troops."

No. 1224 Caesar Rodney to Thomas Rodney
1776 November 182 p.

Encloses an account [not present] of blankets and clothes that were procured for the Delaware Battalion and sent to Thomas McKean in Philadelphia; requests reimbursement for assistance provided to a captain from Virginia who carried letters from the governor of New Orleans [Esteban Miro] to Congress; informs him that in response to a report that a great number of enemy vessels sailed from New York bound for Philadelphia, Caesar Rodney mobilized the army, but remarks: "I no more believe they are Coming at this Season of the year. . . than I believe they Intend Beseiging the Moon"; mentions a report from [John] Hancock that [Gen. Sir Guy] Carleton and his forces have retreated [in Canada].

No. 1409 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 June 141 p.

Informs him that Tyler will return after he draws the linen, makes the overalls, and attempts to procure shirts.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1410 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 September1 p.

Requests that he send Tyler a permit for "tarrying at home."


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1411 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 September 151 p.

Informs him that Tyler intends to leave the service, requests a certificate stating that he is not indebted to the regiment, and remarks: "If I tarry the Winter it would completely make me a beggar, the high price of things is almost damnable."


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1412 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 September 261 p.

Requests that he inform the committee to settle the rank and regulate the army at Providence about Tyler's decision to resign; discusses clothing for the regiment, mentions that Tyler petitioned the [Massachusetts General] Court for clothing, and points out that he will procure clothes for officers only if they send money; informs him that the town meeting is going to present five hundred pairs of shoes and as many shirts to the soldiers from the town.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts; Providence (R.I.)

Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1413 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 September1 p.

Complains about not being able to procure blankets from the clothiers and comments: "I never saw so much confusion in any department in my life"; mentions that Gen. [William] Heath seemed reluctant to issue an order for the blankets; reiterates his own intention to leave the army and his request for a certificate of non-indebtedness to the regiment and remarks: "my Interest will not permit my tarry[ing] any longer."


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1414 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 October 51 p.

Informs him about clothing for Jackson and other officers for which Tyler petitioned and points out that he will procure clothing for the officers only if they send money.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1415 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 November 31 p.

Discusses procuring' accoutrements that formerly belonged to the [British] Seventy-first Regiment and procuring blankets.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1416 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 November 251 p.

Informs him that the regiment will receive one month's pay if abstracts are forwarded; informs him that the officers' clothing will be procured this week and that caps sold very high at auction; mentions that Tyler's wife's illness prevented him from joining the regiment; [postscript]: "The months pay is a present from Congress."


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1417 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 December 11 p.

Informs him that clothing for the officers is finally procured and suggests that part of their pay be stopped until the clothing is paid for.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1418 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 December 14, 172 p.

Forwards clothing for the officers of Jackson's regiment, encloses an account [not present] for same, and discusses paying for the clothing and dividing cloth among the officers; mentions the scarcity of shirts; informs him that Tyler is attempting to get the [Massachusetts] General Court to give the regiment the benefit of the lottery; [postscript]: informs him that if pay abstracts for the regiment are forwarded they will be paid and that the officers' clothing was sent to Providence, [R.I.].


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts; Providence (R.I.)

Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1419 John Steel Tyler to Henry Jackson
1778 December 301 p.

Encloses an account [not present] of the prices of officers' clothing; [postscript]: requests that he forward a keg of sugar and duck clothing.

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 1420 Cornelius Thomas to Elias B. Dayton
1800 June 32 p.

Bill and receipt for carting a load of bricks from the cantonments to Gen. [Alexander] Hamilton's quarters; [on verso]: certification of the service.

No. 1421 Samuel Bayard
1779-17811 p.

Account with the United States for providing living quarters for specified individuals, including General Lafayette.

No. 1590 George Washington to Philip Schuyler
1784 January 212 p.

Expresses the hope "never again to be ' withdrawn" from home and acknowledges the gratitude and approbation of the public and of Schuyler.

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy."

No. 1591 George Washington to General Philip Schuyler
1789 May 92 p.

Acknowledges his congratulations "upon my entrance on a new and arduous task" [as President]; comments that with the adoption of the Constitution, "the clouds which have long darkened our political hemisphere are now dispersing."

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy."

No. 1592 George Washington to Charles Scott
1779 October 192 p.

Discusses the movement of troops to the South and sending surgeons from Philadelphia there; informs him that the enemy are evacuating Rhode Island and will probably concentrate their forces in New York.

No. 1593 George Washington to John Morin Scott
1782 June 102 p.

Discusses the removal of persons from Charleston, [S.C.] by the British.

No. 1594 George Washington to Abraham Skinner
1781 August 284 p.

Discusses an exchange of prisoners who were captured in Canada in 1775 and 1776 and the exchange of Gen. [John] Burgoyne for Henry Laurens.

Other Descriptive Information: A fragment of contemporary New York currency is appended to verso of last page.

No. 1595 George Washington to William Smallwood
1778 February 253 p.

Informs him that Washington will order the Directors of the Hospital to furnish supplies for the sick at Newport, [Del.] and that he approves of Smallwood's proposal for inoculation; discusses problems related to supply and the commissary; requests that he make regular returns of troops; discusses the matter of wives of British officers who were captured aboard a prize vessel; postscript: suggests that a place less exposed than Newport be used as a hospital.

No. 1596 George Washington to William Smallwood and the Field Officers and Commandants of Regiments in the Maryland Line
1779 February 163 p.

Instructs them to examine their regimental and company books in order to determine how many men are actually entitled to a bounty for reenlisting for the war; [on verso of last page]: draft of Smallwood's letter to Colonels [Thomas] Price and [Peter] Adams, [c. Feb. 1779?]: instructs them to summon the officers to consult together on the matter.

No. 1597 George Washington to Rev. G.W. Snyder
1798 September 252 p.

Thanks him for sending a book on "the Illuminati," corrects his impression that Washington is president of "the English lodges" [the Society of Freemasons] in the United States, and expresses the belief that none of the American lodges are contaminated with the principles of the Society of the Illuminati.

No. 1598 George Washington to Alexander Spotswood
1798 September 147 p.

Discusses at length matters regarding the employment of an overseer and a carpenter; comments that without an overseer at one farm, the "Negroes are growing more and more insolant and difficult to govern"; mentions that Spotswood forgot to leave him "the names and grades of those officers whose celebrity were Known in the Revolutionary War."

No. 1599 George Washington to Friedrich Wilhelm, baron von Steuben
1782 April 126 p.

Expresses opinions about a proposal by Count [Maurice August] Beniowski for raising in Europe a legionary corps of Germans for service in America.

No. 1600 George Washington to Annis Boudinot Stockton
1783 September 23 p.

Friendly letter, written in a flirtatious style, that includes an invitation to dine: "when once the Woman has tempted us and we have tasted the forbidden fruit, there is no such thing as checking our appetites, whatever the consequences may be."

No. 1809 John Adams to Cotton Tufts
1797 June 141 p.

Discusses matters related to Adams's farm at Quincy, [Mass.]; comments on "the perturbed State of the World": "The Public has a right to all my Time and thought. . . . Our Public affairs are in a situation uncommonly critical and dangerous."


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 1810 John Adams to Mercy Otis Warren
1787 December 252 p.

Compliments her on her play The Sack of Rome, which she dedicated to him, encloses opinions [not present] of other "tragical Writers" about the play, and discusses difficulties related to getting the play printed; comments that "nothing American sells here. . . . There is a universal desire and Endeavour to forget America. . . . They cannot recollect it without Pain"; encourages her to continue her history [History of the Rise, Progress and Termination of the American Revolution (1805)] mentions that sometime between April and June he hopes to see his friends at Milton Hill.

No. 1811 John Adams to William Wirt
1818 January 52 p.

Compliments him on his Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry [1817] and comments that if Adams himself wrote sketches it would include a long list of Massachusetts men "who were Agents in the Revolution," that he is "very jealous of the honour of Massachusetts," and that James Otis electrified America more than Henry ever did.


Geographic Name(s): Quincy, MA

No. 1812 John Adams to William Wirt
1818 January 233 p.

Requests a copy of his Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry [1817] and relates an anecdote about a meeting with Henry in autumn 1774 when the latter agreed with an opinion that "After all, we must fight."

No. 1813 John Quincy Adams to Rufus King
1797 October 181 p.

Requests that he write to [William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck], duke of Portland's office for an order so that Adams can depart and also that he complain to the duke about the treatment Adams received at his office.


Geographic Name(s): Great Cumberland Place, London

No. 1814 Samuel Adams to Pierre-Auguste Adet
1795 July 282 p.

Acknowledges receipt of Adet's recommendation of Citizen [Theodore C.] Mozard as consul of France and assures him that Adams will aid and advise the consul; comments that Adams "rejoiced in the spreading of the Principles of Liberty and Equality" in France and expresses hope that the two republics "may remain perpetually in the strictest Unity and Harmony."


Geographic Name(s): Boston, MA

No. 1815 Charles Alexander to John Mitchell
1776 March 132 p.

Order to deliver "Rations of Provisions of all Species and Rum" for the armed vessel Chatham; [on verso]: receipt for same.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 1816 James Anderson to Clement Biddle
1800 April 241 p.

Requests that he insert in the newspaper an advertisement for a runaway servant who was suspected of taking the stage for Philadelphia.

No. 1817 Marriot Arbuthnot to George Phillips?
1777 October 1411 p.

Informs him that Gen. [Sir William] Howe landed in the upper part of Chesapeake Bay, had an engagement with Washington's army [the battle of Brandywine], and took possession of Philadelphia; comments that "the root of the contagion lies in the Northern Governments, particularly. . . Massachusetts" and that "the presbyterian parsons and their enthusiastic followers. . . must be chastised and a test calculated for their Government in future, or adieu to every thing but leveling and democracy"; discusses military affairs and civil disturbances in Nova Scotia.


Geographic Name(s): Halifax, NS

No. 1818 Benedict Arnold
1779 April 12 p.

Account with the United States for "Table Expences."

No. 1819 Henry Babcock
1776 February 14-1785 January 281 vol.

Letterbook; correspondents are [William] Bradford, the Speaker of the Rhode Island Assembly [Metcalf Bowler], [Nicholas] Cooke, [James Mitchell] Varnum, [Esek] Hopkins, [Thomas?] Green, [Horatio] Gates, [George] Washington, Rev. Ezra Stiles, [Robert Hanson] Harrison, [Henry] Laurens, [Oliver] Wolcott, [Louis-Rene-Madelaine, comte de] La Touche, [Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur], comte de Rochambeau, [Ethan] Allen, [Jesse?) Root, [William] Franklin, Adam [Babcock], Mr. Lyman, Mr Clarke, and [Philip] Schuyler; subject matter includes problems of supply, defense, and the establishment of military discipline, the construction of forts, the apprehension of Tories, engagements between British vessels and American shore batteries, a prisoner exchange, the Penobscot expedition, a plan for coining money, his request for promotion to brigadier general and accusations regarding his mental incapacity, his attempt to obtain a parole for Gov. William Franklin, the meeting between Washington and Count Rochambeau at Newport, purchasing land in Vermont, his own service during the Seven Years' War, imprisonment for debt, his own indebtedness, and his petitions related to the latter, and the establishment of a society for the promotion of agriculture.

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment


Geographic Name(s): Newport (R.I.)

No. 1820 Elijah Backus to Asa Backus
1779 April 212 p.

Order to guard prisoners of war in transit to Hartford; [on verso]: certification that the order was read.


Geographic Name(s): Norwich, CT

No. 1821 William Bacon
1776 August 211 p.

Record and sentence of the regimental court-martial of Clark Pixley, a soldier, "for Disobedience of Orders, and haughtily refusing to do his Duty."

No. 1822 Battle of Bunker Hill
n.d.1 p.

The Battle of Bunker Hill, Composed by a British Officer, at the engagement: a poem.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed

No. 1823 George Benson to Welcome Arnold
1779 May 41 p.

Sends him "the most accurate price current" for various articles of merchandise.

No. 1824 William M. Betts to John Fisher
1779 April 51 p.

Instructs him to forward cordage, pack saddles, and pickaxes.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 2153 George Washington to James Clinton
1780 November 291 p.

Informs him that Washington ordered part of Clinton's brigade to be stationed between Albany and Fort Schuyler, [N.Y.] to secure communications, but directs that the troops not be too scattered because of "a necessity for the Officers being together to settle the new arrangement of the Army."

No. 2154 George Washington to James Clinton
1781 February 201 p.

Informs him that Washington instructed the Commissary General [Ephraim Blaine] to draw upon the magazine at Richmond, [Mass.] for barrels of salt provisions for troops at Albany and Schenectady, [N.Y.] and for the garrison at Fort Schuyler, [N.Y.] and instructs him to supply the latter post for three months "before the Roads are broken up"; orders him to direct that recruits be sent to the brigade as soon as they are raised.

No. 2155 George Washington to James Clinton
1781 April 122 p.

Informs him about efforts to procure supplies of salt provisions and flour for Fort Schuyler, [N.Y.]; informs him that the Board of War Claimed that they are not able to support the armory at Albany, [N.Y.]; informs him that a supply of stores was sent to the hospital [at Albany].

No. 2156 George Washington to James Clinton
1781 May 181 p.

Expresses hope that at a meeting in Connecticut with [Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur], Count de Rochambeau, "something definitive in regard to the Campaign will be settled" so that "we shall know with certainty how to apply our force"; expresses regret that a rainstorm that destroyed the works at Fort Schuyler, [N.Y.] might mean the "valuable Post" will have to be abandoned.

No. 2157 George Washington to James Clinton
1781 July 62 p.

Orders him to detain at Albany, [N.Y.] troops who were destined for West Point, [N.Y.] and to have the latter ready for embarkation aboard transports; includes a notation on address leaf: "To be forwarded with the greatest dispatch."

No. 2158 George Washington to Jacques Cole-Mountflorence
1779 September 281 p.

Acknowledges his offer of service but discourages him from traveling to America because Washington cannot assure him an appointment as an officer.

No. 2159 George Washington to the commanding officer of Gen. John Stark's Brigade
1780 February 113 p.

Inquires about several "defects and abuses" in the brigade and instructs that they be remedied.

No. 2160 George Washington to Adam Comstock
1777 February 21 p.

Orders him to proceed to Rhode Island in order to raise a regiment on the Continental Establishment, appoint a place where recruits can rendezvous for training, and inform Washington about his progress.

No. 2161 George Washington to Francis Corbin
1798 July 242 p.

Mentions the death of [Rev. Jeremy] Belknap; informs him that if it is necessary for Washington to take the field as commander-in-chief, experienced aides and officers will be required, but points out that if a provisional force is called out there will be openings for "Spirited Gentlemen, of influence, in the different States."

No. 2162 George Washington to the Council of Massachusetts Bay
1780 September 123 p.

Urges them to supply the army with salt provisions so that it can cooperate with French forces when they arrive and points out that "distresses for meat still continue pressing and alarming" and result in "Complaints and murmuring, a relaxation of discipline, marauding, robbery and desertion."


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 2163 George Washington to John Cropper
1799 June 177 p.

Requests that he recommend qualified individuals to serve as officers in a Virginia regiment of infantry that was authorized by Congress to be raised in the event of war or imminent danger of invasion and gives advice about choosing proper individuals.

No. 2164 George Washington to Bartholomew Dandridge
1797 April 31 p.

Informs him that the. President [John Adams] declined to take any furniture in the green drawing room and requests that the "lustre" [chandelier] be sent as a gift to Mrs. [Mary White] Morris.

No. 2165 George Washington to Elias Dayton
1781 February 72 p.

Informs him that Col. [Israel] Shreve has retired from command of the Jersey Brigade and urges him to assume command in order to avoid a dispute over rank between two lieutenant colonels that "may produce parties and cabals to the great detriment of the service."

No. 2166 George Washington to Elias Dayton
1781 August 181 p.

Orders him to assist in embarking heavy cannon on the west side of the [Hudson] River; postscript: orders him to prepare to march tomorrow with the New Jersey Continental troops and their baggage.

No. 2167 George Washington to Jonathan Dayton
1782 May 212 p.

Commends him for detaining a flag of truce with prisoners from New York and orders him to allow the flag to return but to direct that no more flags are to be sent or received at Elizabethtown, [N. J.] and that any persons coming from the enemy to that place with a flag will be held as prisoners.

No. 158 Daniel Carthy to John Fisher
1780 December 293 p.

Requests boards, nails, and oars.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 159 Daniel Carthy to John Fisher
1781 June 221 p.

Requests that he convey a letter from Dr. [William] Eustis to Dr. [David?] Townsend at Albany.


Geographic Name(s): New York; Albany, N.Y.

No. 160 Daniel Carthy to John Fisher
1782 April 93 p.

Discusses delivering boats.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 161 Daniel Carthy to John Fisher
1782 May 141 p.

Gives instructions about delivering tents.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 162 Thomas Cartwright to Henry Jackson
1778 October 51 p.

Informs him that the reason Cartwright did not return punctually from furlough was because he was appointed aide-de-camp to Gen. [William] Heath.

No. 163 Thomas Cartwright and James Jones to Henry Jackson
1777 May 163 p.

Inform him about their problems in recruiting men to fill Jackson's regiment, point out that the regiment will be filled only by drafts, and remark that some men said they would join "if paper money would pass" and also that "They were ready to fight when men of Fortune & monopolizers did."


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 164 Richard Caswell to John Coart
1778 December 61 p.

Instructs him to provision Col. [James] Armstrong's Continental troops and the New Bern District, [N.C.] militia.


Geographic Name(s): Kingston, NC

No. 165 ________ to Stephen Chambers
1781 February 51 p.

Receipt for his proportion of tax for recruiting a man for the Continental army.


Subject(s): Taxation

No. 166 Gibraltar
n.d.2 p.

Ca n(e) devoit pas finir com' ca: a song about the defense of Gibraltar against the British; includes music.

Other Descriptive Information: In French; printed

No. 167 Pennsylvania, a number of inhabitants of Chester County to the Representatives of the Freeman of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly
n.d.1 p.

Petition that opposes the opening of a road laid out from the Middle Ferry on the Schuylkill River to Shawsborough in Lancaster County.

Other Descriptive Information: Draft


Geographic Name(s): Pennsylvania; Lancaster (Pa.); Chester County (Pa.)

No. 168 Richard Claiborne to ________
1780 January 41 p.

Encloses blank returns [not present] of persons employed and of stores on hand.

Other Descriptive Information: "Circular"


Geographic Name(s): Morristown, NJ

No. 169 Rev. William Clark to Samuel Holten
1777 August 41 p.

Informs him that Clark has been imprisoned for two months and is in ill health, mentions that he might petition the [Massachusetts] General Court for release and is willing to go into exile, and requests that he be granted liberty of the town.


Geographic Name(s): Boston, MA

No. 170 Matthew Clarkson to John Barry
1779 February 133 p.

Gives instructions about negotiating Continental Loan Office certificates on the best possible terms in the West Indies; comments that the reputation of Continental currency seems to be getting better and that the treaty with Spain will make the currency more valuable; gives instructions about goods in which to invest in the West Indies; includes an invoice of Continental Loan Office certificates to be disposed of in the West Indies on account of Matthew Clarkson and Company.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 171 Peter Clayes to Joseph Balcom" Balcolm"
1783 January 242 p.

Informs him that the troops are comfortably situated in huts "but have very little to amuse ourselves with besides patroling" and also that "a grand theater" is being built that "will be apropreated for the amusement of the officers of the army at large, where will be public exhibitions of different natures almost daily."

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 172 Jacob Clingman to John Beckley
1793 June 272 p.

Informs him that A[ndrew} G. Fraunces implicated "Col [Alexander Hamilton] and "D____er" [William Duet] in speculation in pay certificates and stock; [docketed]: "Respecting A. Hamilton's Connection with [James] Reynolds."

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy"


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 173 Sir Henry Clinton to Lord George Germain
1779 February 32 p.

Informs him about the success of the expedition to Georgia and remarks that the rebels have not made any "material movement" in reaction and that Clinton is not apprehensive about the safety of Georgia; informs him that two fleets of provision ships have arrived at New York from Cork, [Ireland].

Other Descriptive Information: "Duplicate"


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 174 Sir Henry Clinton to Charles Jenkinson
1780 August 241 p.

Transmits a half-yearly certificate [not present] of general and staff officers under Clinton's command on the Establishment in North America from 25 Dec. 1779 to 24 June 1780.

Other Descriptive Information: "Duplicate"


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 175 Sir Henry Clinton to David Thomas
1781 March 191 p.

Warrant to pay subsistence money to Ensigns Richard Hawkins and Charles Parke of the Twenty-seventh Regiment of Foot.

Other Descriptive Information: Bound in Sparks, Life of Washington, vol. 3


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 176 James Clinton and Enoch Poor to John Sullivan
1779 November 302 p.

An address on the occasion of Sullivan's resignation in which the officers of Clinton's and Poor's brigades tender their thanks for his "wise, equal, prudent & spirited conduct" during his command.

Other Descriptive Information: Draft

No. 177 George Clymer to Tench Coxe
1794 November 21 p.

Encloses his own official quarterly accounts, abstracts, and bond accounts [not present] with the United States.

No. 178 George Clymer to Samuel Meredith
1810 February 172 p.

Discusses a supply of hams.


Geographic Name(s): Trenton, NJ

No. 179 George Clymer to Samuel Meredith
1812? January 111 p.

Informs him that a note will be due.

No. 180 George Clymer to Susannah Wright
1779 September 72 p.

Friendly letter; rejoices "with you and all good Whigs in the prosperous Situation of our Continental Affairs."


Geographic Name(s): Roxborough, PA

No. 181 Henry Clymer to George Clymer
1802 August 61 p.

Promissory note.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

Subject(s): Promissory notes

No. 182 David Cobb to Elias Dayton
1781 July 201 p.

Transmits an order from [General Washington] that Dayton furnish Col. [Henry] Dearborn with small parties of men.


Geographic Name(s): Dobbs Ferry, NY

No. 183 Christopher Codwise to Frederick Weisenfels
1783 April 301 p.

Transmits his own opinion in favor of commutation.


Geographic Name(s): New York

No. 184 William Coit to ________
1775 June1 p.

Gives British casualty figures and the number of American prisoners captured [at the battle of Bunker Hill]; informs him that Gen. [Sir William] Howe said that "the persons who think the Provincials are undisciplined, are much mistaken"; mentions that Coit was told details about the battle at the [Connecticut?] Committee of Safety; postscript: "General [John] Burgoyne is among the slain."

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 185 Ebenezer Cole
1780 February 201 p.

Oath of enlistment in the Continental army and oath of allegiance to the United States.


Subject(s): United States. Continental Army

No. 186 Regarding Benjamin Franklin
n.d.4 p.

"Epitre a Franklin": a poem that eulogizes Benjamin Franklin.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 187 Pierre de La Colomb to John Jay, President of Congress
1779 late July-early August9 p.

Requests a rank of brevet major; includes his service record and an account of his misfortunes.

Other Descriptive Information: Two copies in English and one in French


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 188 Pierre-Emile Colomb to ________
17941 p.

"Memoire de retraite": report of his retirement that details his service in the French army and requests a pension.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 189 Peter Colt
1778 January 202 p.

Certification that Stephen Barns is appointed an assistant purchaser in the American army and is authorized to procure provisions; [on verso]: certification by Roger Sherman that Barns presented his authorization.


Geographic Name(s): New Haven, Connecticut

No. 190 Massachusetts, Committee of Safety to John Thomas
n.d.1 p.

Instructions regarding giving receipts for firearms.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 191 State of Connecticut, General Assembly
1780 October 12-13, 16-172 p.

Minutes of proceedings that mention supplying the treasury, recruiting the army, selling forfeited estates, and revising militia laws.


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 192 State of Connecticut, Hartford County Court to the sheriff or constables
1786 September 162 p.

Writ to summon Abner Granger of Suffield in a lawsuit for debt; signed by Roger Sherman, judge.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 193 State of Connecticut, Attorney Andrew Adams to the county court
1777 September 262 p.

Notice to commence due process against Azariah Culver, a soldier, for failure to muster and march to Peekskill, N.Y. according to orders; includes a writ to the sheriff or constables, 30 Dec. 1777, to summon Culver; [on verso]: certification by Timothy Skinner, constable, 7 March 1778, that he served the summons.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 194 State of Connecticut, Pay-Table Office to John Lawrence, treasurer
1783 May 231 p.

Order to pay Col. Samuel Canfield; signed by William Moseley and Oliver Wolcott, Jr.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 195 State of Connecticut, Pay-Table Office to John Lawrence, treasurer
1784 February 61 p.

Order to pay Capt. Benjamin Durkee; signed by Oliver Wolcott, Jr., and Eleazar Wales.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 196 State of Connecticut, Windham County Court to Benjamin Tracy
1802 December 272 p.

Writ to summon Simon Williams, Jr., of Lebanon in a lawsuit for debt; signed by Jonathan Trumbull, governor; [on verso]: Tracy's certification, 27 Dec. 1802, that he served the writ, and an account of fees.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Connecticut

No. 197 Zachariah Connelly
1776 September 131 p.

Certification that forty-one men passed over Jacob Bousman's ferry, for which the latter was not paid.

No. 198 Henry Seymour Conway to John Irwin
1765 December 174 p.

Encloses a copy [not present] of the King's [George III's] speech to Parliament; informs him that the King and his ministers "thought it advisable to lay the whole matter of the late Disturbances in America before Parliament, in the Design of giving the fullest Weight to such Regulations as may be necessary"; comments that the "Prudence and Wisdom" of Parliament will remedy the evils in America and "produce such wise and salutary Regulations as may insure the future tranquility and Prosperity of the Colonies"; encloses a copy [present] of a unanimous resolution of the House of Commons regarding presenting an address to the King, which deals in part with "those important Occurences in America."

Other Descriptive Information: "Circular"

No. 199 Thomas Conway to Robert Morris
1777 August 91 p.

Remarks that Colonel Armand's [Armand-Charles Tuffin, marquis de La Rouerie's] demand to add light horsemen to his corps should not be rejected and complains that the light horsemen presently in the army are of no use in military operations: "they are merely employed as Messengers or Waiters to general officers which is absolutely ridiculous."


Geographic Name(s): Pennsylvania

No. 200 Abel Cooley to Solomon Miller, Jr.
1777 June 191 p.

Receipt for money received as a reward for enlisting "half of a man" in the Continental service.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 201 Lord Charles Cornwallis to ______ MacLeod
1795 December 211 p.

[Manuscript was donated to Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y.]

No. 202 Lord Charles Cornwallis to George Washington
1777 April 31 p.

Encloses a paper [not present] [regarding a demand for fulfilling previous agreements for a prisoner exchange] that Lt. Col. [William] Walcott delivered to Lt. Col. [Robert Hanson] Harrison, and which the latter "did not think proper to receive."

No. 203 John Cox to Henry Hollingsworth
1778 October 162 p.

Informs him that Cox cannot comply with a request for cash because of "the large sums thought immediately necessary in the Commissary Generals Department"; instructs him to pay wagoners in compliance with the recently passed "Waggon Law" of Pennsylvania; informs him that Cox will attempt to procure clothing for the carters.

No. 204 John Cox to Henry Hollingsworth
1779 July 82 p.

Requests a general return of everything pertaining to the Quartermaster's department in Hollingsworth's district and informs him that according to the Quartermaster General's [Nathanael Greene's] instructions, deputies who neglect to make regular monthly returns "will be discontinued without ceremony."

Other Descriptive Information: "Circular"


Subject(s): United States. Army. Quartermaster's Department

No. 205 Tench Coxe to Tobias Lear
1791 December 291 p.

Encloses a copy [not present] of a letter from Dr. [John] Kemp of Columbia College to Coxe and inquires when it will be convenient for [Archibald] Robertson to present a box [from David Stuart Erskine, Lord Buchan] to the President [George Washington].

No. 206 Tench Coxe to John Wilcocks
1784 April 201 p.

Discusses the payment of a bill.

No. 207 Tench Coxe
1797 April 59 p.

"Questions concerning the possible grounds of dissatisfaction on the part of France against the United States," enclosed in a letter [not present] to the President [John Adams].

Other Descriptive Information: "Private"


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 208 Jacob Crane
1780 June 111 p.

Return of the First Regiment, Essex County, [N.J.] militia, commanded by Col. Moses Jacques.

Other Descriptive Information: Notation on verso: "Steuben Papers"

No. 209 Louis de Berton des Balbes de Quiers duc de Crillon-Mahon to M. de Mongelas
1783 March 172 p.

Recommends M. Granet, a surgeon, for military duty.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 210 Zacheus Crocker to Samuel Chamberlain
1777 August 151 p.

Warrant in compliance with a resolution of the [Massachusetts] General Court that instructs him to notify the officers and men of Crocker's company to muster at the meeting house.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 211 Armand-Charles-Augustin de la Croix duc de Castries to Michel Setaro
1797 August 241 p.

Receipt for victuals and forage for the Regiment of Castries from 25 June to 24 Aug. 1797.

No. 212 William Crosbie to Sir Henry Clinton
1782 March 91 p.

Memorial that requests that Clinton issue a warrant for £30,000 so that Crosbie can "Carry on the Business of his Department" [as barrack master general].

No. 213 John Crossan
1781 September 261 p.

Oath of enlistment in the Pennsylvania Line and oath of allegiance to the United States.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 214 Richard Cumberland to ________
17762 p.

Comments on "that tide of nonsense, which our public prints empty upon the public ear relative to a matter, which either is, or ought to be, conducted with the utmost delicacy"; instructs him to acquaint the public about news from Gov. [Sir Guy] Carleton in Canada regarding the cantonment of British troops and the efforts of the rebels and of the British in building a fleet for next season, and remarks that "Little is to be apprehended from these preparations of the Rebels" because they lack artillery and other equipment and also because Philadelphia did not spare shipwrights for "A's" [Benedict Arnold's] defense.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 215 John Cushing to John Turner
1778 February 261 p.

Order to muster Turner's company in the Second Regiment, Plymouth County militia for the purpose of detaching men to march to the garrison at Hull, [Mass.].

No. 216 Joseph Cushing to Theophilus Cotton
1777 July 221 p.

Orders him to march part of Cushing's brigade to Providence, R.I.


Geographic Name(s): Providence (R.I.)

No. 217 Nathaniel Cushing
1780 August 242 p.

Return and muster roll of his company.

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment

No. 218 _______ Blambart? to Adam Philippe, Comte de Custine
1792 November 22 p.

Petition for payment for supplies provided in Sept. and Oct. 1792; approved by Custine.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 219 Pierre de Villeneuve
1792 December 182 p.

Authorization of payment of specified sums to an individual who provided assistance in military actions; approved by [Adam-Philippe, comte de] Custine.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 220 Eleanor Parke Custis to James McHenry
1798 July 262 p.

Informs him that a dragoon company has a color staff that was used by the first company in which [George Washington] served and gives instructions for ornamenting the staff and making a standard for it.

No. 221 John Custis and Tully Wise
1791 September 211 p.

Affidavit that a certificate that Negro Southy produced in Cuba that claims he is a freeman is a forgery.

No. 222 William Daingerfield to the contractor for Winchester Barracks
1783 July 161 p.

Provision return for a detachment of [Col. Anthony Walton White's] First Regiment of Light Dragoons [the First Legionary Corps], 13-16 July 1783; includes a receipt for the rations from Thompson Davis to the contractor, 13 July.

No. 223 Campbell Dalrymple to Robert Monckton
1762 April 201 p.

Informs him about a change of officers in a regiment; informs him that the legislature of Antigua, [W.I.] intends to complain that a contractor from Barbados, [W.I.] who supplies Monckton with rum from Dutch settlements does so "to the great discouragement of their Manufacture & produce."

No. 224 David Daniells to Asa Daniells, Jr.
n.d.2 p.

Friendly letter; comments that his health is preserved "while so many around you are confined on beds of languishing and weakness" and reflects on human mortality.

No. 225 Jules Daverzac
1818 July12 p.

Poem that eulogizes Gen. R[ichard] Montgomery.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 226 William Davis to Henry Jackson
1778 August 71 p.

Recommends his own son, who goes on the present expedition as a cadet, to Jackson's care and patronage; congratulates Jackson and his regiment on their safe arrival in Providence.


Geographic Name(s): Providence (R.I.)

No. 227 John Day to Thomas Mifflin
1775 August 222 p.

Queries written by a "Contractor for the King's troops" regarding the separation between Britain and the American colonies.

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy"

No. 228 William Day to John Johnson
1740 June 51 p.

Receipt for 200 lbs. of bullets.

No. 229 Silas Deane to Robert Morris
1776 March 81 p.

Inquiries whose pilot boat will precede them and reconnoitre the [Delaware] Capes.

No. 230 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1804 January 271 p.

Informs him that the Treasurer of the United States [Thomas Tudor Tucker] will transmit $10,000 to Coxe on the clothing department account.

No. 231 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1804 June 141 p.

Instructs him to pay the balance due for work done on cannon carriages and to advance money for jackscrews to an individual who is under contract.

No. 232 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1805 January 81 p.

Approves of measures that he took regarding the importation of strouds.

No. 233 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1805 February 281 p.

Instructs him to furnish the Superintendent of Military Stores [Callender Irvine] with a description of articles of military clothing.

No. 234 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1805 June 201 p.

Instructs him to foward jackets to the troops and to engage for only one year's supply of shoes; informs him that $6000 will be remitted to him on the Clothing Department account for 1805.

No. 235 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1805 January 211 p.

Gives instructions about patterns for military clothing.

No. 236 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1805 January 301 p.

Gives instructions about patterns for pairs of clasps and for stocks.

No. 237 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1806 March 52 p.

Instructs him to discontinue red plumes and epaulets for the infantry.

No. 238 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1806 March 61 p.

Instructs him to pay the balance due a contractor for making jackscrews.

No. 239 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1806 March 121 p.

Instructs him to govern himself regarding the posts and to take due notice of returns of military clothing on hand according to information previously transmitted by Dearborn.

No. 240 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1806 November 61 p.

Discusses military clothing and provisions destined for Fort Adams, [Miss.?] that were lost when a barge sank.

No. 241 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1808 February 261 p.

Discusses purchasing cloth suitable for soldiers' clothing that is offered for sale in Portland, Me.

No. 242 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1808 March 311 p.

Instructs him to inform Dearborn about the current and past price of copper in pigs.

No. 243 Henry Dearborn to Tench Coxe
1808 October 171 p.

Informs him that the United States Treasury will remit money to him on the accounts for fabricating arms, for the Indian Department, and for clothing for the army; encloses a letter [not present] for his consideration that recommends persons as contractors for the manufacture of arms.

No. 244 Henry Dearborn to Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn
1808 March 84 p.

Discusses recommending an individual for an appointment; mentions that Congress will probably authorize raising additional troops.

No. 245 Henry Dearborn to Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn
1822 May 91 p.

Gives instructions in the event of an announcement of his own appointment [as minister to Portugal].

No. 246 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1803 November 251 p.

Informs him that the United States Treasury will transmit $3000 to him.

No. 247 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1806" 1807? January 8"1 p.

Instructs him to supply money to a lieutenant for the contingencies of the recruiting service and informs him that the paymaster of the army has already supplied the latter with funds for the payment of bounties and premiums.

No. 248 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1806 November 121 p.

Inquires about a delay in sending medicine to the post at St. Louis, [Mo.].

No. 249 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1806 December 11 p.

Inquires about the accounts of a former assistant military agent.

No. 250 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1806 December 101 p.

Informs him that Dearborn is satisfied that Mr. Sheftall should have an appointment on the terms proposed and encloses a letter [not present] regarding the matter.

No. 251 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1806 December 291 p.

Instructs him to furnish contingency money to a lieutenant at a recruiting rendezvous in Philadelphia; instructs him to return the accounts of a lieutenant because they are needed in an investigation.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 252 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1807 March 161 p.

Discusses wages for workmen; instructs him to purchase and ship burnt brick to New Orleans, [La.] and inquires about the cost and quantity of foundation stone delivered there.

No. 253 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1807 April 161 p.

Instructs him to provide wagons and money to a detachment that is going to Pittsburgh, [Pa.].

No. 254 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1807 May 281 p.

Discusses purchasing and shipping brick and stone to Fort Pinckney, [S.C.].

No. 255 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1807 October 241 p.

Instructs him to advance money to a captain on account of the contingencies of the recruiting service.

No. 256 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1807 December 141 p.

Informs him about the whereabouts of a lieutenant who resigned; instructs him to procure a vessel to transport the military, factory, and annuity goods for the Choctaw Indians from Philadelphia to Fort St. Stephens, [Ala.].


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 257 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1808 January 261 p.

Instructs him to procure two machines for driving piles and forward them to Fort Johnston, Charleston, S.C., where they will be delivered to a captain in the Corps of Engineers.


Geographic Name(s): Charleston (S.C.)

No. 258 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1808 February 221 p.

Gives instructions about a machine for driving piles.

No. 259 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1808 November 211 p.

Informs him that a captain has been appointed assistant military agent; informs him that Dearborn ordered a remittance of $8000 for Linnard.

No. 260 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1808 December 61 p.

Gives instructions about the wood allowance for officers at recruiting rendezvous.

No. 261 Henry Dearborn to William Linnard
1808 December 151 p.

Instructs him to procure a suitable vessel to transport troops from Philadelphia to New Orleans, [La.].


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 262 Julius Deming to Ebenezer Foote
1778 November 272 p.

Gives instructions about receipts for cattle, delivering cattle for the army at Danbury, [Conn.], assisting commissaries, and paying wages to butchers and to men who weigh beef.


Geographic Name(s): Danbury (Conn.)

No. 263 Julius Deming to Ebenezer Foote
1779 March 21 p.

Instructs him not to stop any more droves of cattle that are destined for Middlebrook, [N.J.] and to draw salted beef for troops until Foote can procure cattle.

No. 264 Julius Deming to Ebenezer Foote
1779 September 111 p.

Informs him that money was sent to him and commends his attention to "Continental business."

No. 265 Charles Dempsey
1787 March 141 p.

Affidavit that a certificate for $33 30/90 has not been alienated or trans- ferred but is his property.

No. 266 John Dennis to James Robinson" [Robertson]"
1779 January 42 p.

Second memorial that requests release from confinement and offers "to perform an Act that would distress some Part of the rebel Army ... as a Proof of my attachment to Government."

Other Descriptive Information: "True Copy"

No. 267 George D'erbage to George Chalmers
1779 April 92 p.

Requests his attendance on 13 April at a meeting of the Board of Agents for the American Loyalists; [on verso]: memorandum [by Chalmers?] that argues that when the Americans acknowledged their independence they became aliens and that compares the situation of "the revolted colonies" with the British territories of Gascogne, Guienne, and Calais.

No. 268 N______ Thomas to Thomas Dering
1752-17552 p.

Bill; [on verso]: receipt for same.

No. 269 Moses Deshon
1764 December 181 p.

Auctioneer's account of the sale of a silver watch.

No. 270 Richard Devens to Eldrige" Elbridge Gerry"
1776 May 72 p.

Discusses canvas for tents, saltpetre, and powder; informs him about repairs on fortifications in the vicinity of Boston and mentions that people in the neighboring towns "in great numbers work Voluntarily & find their own provision"; remarks: "We were left in a very naked Situation both as to men and ammunition"; informs him that an American privateer captured two brigs "Almost from under the Cannon of the Man of War"; informs him about a report that no fleet from England has arrived at Halifax, [N.S.] and that the people there dismantled the fort and broke the cannon for fear the Americans would get possession of them.

No. 271 Massachusetts Clergyman
17751 vol.

Diary of an unidentified clergyman, interleaved with [Isaiah] Thomas's New-England Almanack . . . For . . . 1775.


Geographic Name(s): Massachusetts

No. 272 Robert Digby to Paul Henry Curry
1780 October 261 p.

Encloses a demand [not present) for stores for a vessel and requests that he forward it by the first ship that sails to join the fleet.

No. 273 Robert Digby to Paul Henry Curry
1780 October 251 p.

Encloses a demand [not present] for two fids for the topmast of a vessel and requests that he forward it by the first ship that sails to join the fleet.

No. 274 Dr. Elijah Dix to whom it may concern
1782 May 131 p.

Certification of the "Bodily and Mental Indispositions" of a soldier from Boston that render the latter unfit for any kind of service during the war.

No. 275 John A. Dix
1862 April 201 p.

Pass for Mr. Stansbury to Fort Federal Hill and Fort McHenry, [Md.].

No. 276 Peter Dolliver to Henry Jackson
1778 October 281 p.

Informs him that "considering the Long time I have been in the Service, and the probability of the enemy leaving our Continent," Dolliver will not resign from the army "provided I have justice done me in the Arrangement."

No. 277 Alexander McDonald
1779 December 241 p.

Account of sixty-one days' subsistence from 25 Oct. to 24 Dec. 1779 for the non-commissioned officers and privates in ten companies of the [British] Second Battalion, Eighty-fourth Regiment, commanded by Sir Henry Clinton; includes a receipt from McDonald to Richard Rigby for same.

No. 278 John Robert Douglas to Major ______ Knolles
1781 June 241 p.

Receipt for pay as aide-de-camp to Gen. James Murray from 25 Dec. 1780 to 24 June 1781.

No. 279 Amnason Dow to Josiah Bartlett
1767 April 81 p.

Promissory note.


Subject(s): Promissory notes

No. 280 Richard Drakeford to Alexander Leslie
1778 July 182 p.

Responds to a complaint that Drakeford mistreated an American lieutenant who is a prisoner.

No. 281 Friends Society of Philadelphia to the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
1793 December 63 p.

The Address and Petition of the People called Quakers: complains about "the extravagance and enormities which. . . have been introduced into this city and country" and requests that laws for the suppression of vice and immorality be reviewed and amended; signed in type by John Drinker, clerk.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 282 Thomas Lundin, Lord Drummond to James Robertson
1776 February 52 p.

Comments that based on his own conversations with American leaders in Philadelphia, the latter desire a reconciliation with Britain, not total 45 separation; mentions that Drummond has pressed for the start of negotiations and requests a blank passport in that event; [postscript]: cautions him against publicizing the letter too soon.

Other Descriptive Information: "Copy"


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 283 James Duane to John Tabor Kempe
1774 October 112 p.

Complains about losing his own clients and remarks: "This Trade of Patriotism but ill agrees with the profession of a practising Lawyer"; remarks that Duane is not at liberty to communicate the proceedings of the "American Council" [the Continental Congress], but that in a few weeks all will be publicly disclosed; discusses a lawsuit; discusses patriot accusations against Kempe and other Tories.

No. 284 James Duane to his children and to William North
1790 July 262 p.

Informs them about his arrival in New York and remarks: "the City affords no pleasure for me especially at this time when the removal of Congress gives general dissatisfaction"; discusses a proposal by the inhabitants of Cambden, [New Hampshire Grants] to pay Duane and North in cattle.

No. 285 William John Duane to Samuel B. Davis
1837 March 311 p.

Offers specified books and cash in payment of a debt owed by the estate of his insolvent father [William Duane]; complains that an unpaid debt of $70,000 was due his father from the republican subscribers to the latter's newspaper [the Aurora] and comments: "So much for the gratitude and the honesty of political friends and patrons!"

No. 286 Mathieu, Comte de Dumas to General Alexandre Berthier
1801 November 171 p.

Transmits the request of Philippe Segur for promotion to a lieutenancy.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 287 Mathieu, Comte de Dumas to M. Lemaire
1814 September 172 p.

Informs him that requests for reimbursement without receipts and detailed statements of dates cannot be honored by the Department of the Liquidation of the Armies.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 288 Mathieu, Comte de Dumas to M. Pelle
1814 December 21 p.

Discusses the balance of payments for claims made to the Department of the Liquidation of the Armies.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 289 Charles-Francois Dumouriez to ________
1762 September 171 p.

Letter of passage for a messenger to Fontainebleu, [France].

Other Descriptive Information: In French


Geographic Name(s): France

No. 290 Andrew Dunscomb to Edward Dunscomb
1783 July 91 p.

Informs him that an act was passed by Congress for all accounts to be settled by [John] Pierce, [ Jr.], and that he must attend at the War Office in Philadelphia before certificates will be given.


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 291 Edward Dunscomb to Peter Gansevoort
1783 June 102 p.

Mentions a meeting of officers for the purpose of settling accounts, urges speedy settlement of public accounts, discusses problems that would arise from delay, and expresses apprehension that if [Robert] Morris retires from office [as Superintendent of Finances] before their claims are satisfied, "we shall assuredly be plunged into an ocean of difficulties."

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm

No. 292 Edward Dunscomb to ________
1783 June 32 p.

Points out that although Dunscomb was appointed by fellow officers contrary to his wishes as agent for the half-pay officers of New York, he will endeavor "to answer their expectations," and discusses matters related to commutation and the settlement of public accounts.

Other Descriptive Information: Typescript transcription on microfilm

No. 293 Edward Dunscomb to ________
1783 June 112 p.

Informs him that a letter of attorney will be sent to all the deranged officers in the vicinity of Kingston, [N.Y.] and requests that he forward the letter to Dunscomb after it is signed; complains that officers are "extremely tardy" in settling public accounts, points out that accounts must be settled before anything is done about commutation, and gives instructions for submitting certificates of settlement.

Other Descriptive Information: Draft; Typescript transcription on microfilm

No. 294 Edward Dunscomb to ________
1783 August 22 p.

Informs him that as agent for the half-pay officers of New York State, Dunscomb visited the War Office in Philadelphia in order to signify the disposition of the officers in favor of commutation instead of half-pay, Points out that problems subsequently arose, and requests his assistance in facilitating the matter.

Other Descriptive Information: Draft


Geographic Name(s): Philadelphia, PA

No. 295 Edward Dunscomb to Peter Gansevoort?
17831 p.

Informs him that in regard to a settlement [of accounts related to commutation], Dunscomb must wait "until the Pleasure of Congress is known."

Other Descriptive Information: Fragment

No. 296 Peter Stephen Du Ponceau to Rev. Charles Rudolph Demme
1834 July 191 p.

Requests a seat in the church choir so that his granddaughter can view a ceremony.

No. 297 Louis Le Begue de Presle Du Portail to M. ______ de Bayet
1791 June 11 p.

Orders him to join the regiment.

Other Descriptive Information: In French

No. 298 John Durkee to John Sumner
1779 January 41 p.

Discusses problems related to procuring clothing and urges him to exercise great care in distributing clothing agreeable to orders.

No. 299 John Durkee to John Sumner
1779 February 151 p.

Inquires whether or not the regiment received sufficient clothing, mentions clothing for musicians and drummers, and inquires about the state of the regiment.

No. 300 John Durkee to John Sumner
1779 April 51 p.

Informs him that Durkee ordered a sergeant into the country to collect deserters and those who "outstayed their furlows" and also that a lieutenant deserted; inquires about suits of clothes for musicians; remarks that "as for Cloathing I don't know where its to come from."

No. 301 Massachusetts, Bristol County, Town of Easton to the constables of the town
1776 March 22 p.

Warrant to notify qualified voters to assemble at the meeting house on 18 March in order to conduct town business, choose a committee of correspondence, inspection, and safety, and choose a committee to encourage the manufacture of saltpetre "in Private families"; signed by Ephraim Randell and Timothy Randell, selectmen; [on verso]: acknowledgment by Seth Manley, 8 March 1776, that he complied with the instructions of the warrant.


Geographic Name(s): Easton, Massachusetts

No. 302 Rev. Joseph Eckley to ________
n.d.2 p.

Encloses a dismission [not present] from the Old South Church in Boston and a recommendation [not present] to the North Church in Salem, [Mass.].


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

Subject(s): Old South Church (Boston, Mass.)

No. 303 Rev. Joseph Eckley
1787 April 221 p.

Resolution of the "Old South [Church] Society" to permit the pastor of the Hollis Street Church to use their meeting house, "his own having been destroyed by the late terible fire."


Geographic Name(s): Boston (Mass.)

Subject(s): Old South Church (Boston, Mass.)

No. 304 Rev. Joseph Eckley
1777 November1 vol.

Thanksgiving sermon.

No. 305 Thomas Eddy
1794 June 41 p.

Affidavit regarding the importation of goods from Amsterdam, [Netherlands].

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form


Geographic Name(s): Amsterdam, Netherlands

No. 306 Hephzibah? Edwards to Mary Dering
October3 p.

Complains about letters being opened and read before Edwards receives them and that many families, including Edwards's, have been turned out of their homes; remarks: "when I read Govt. Hutchersons [Thomas Hutchinson's] letter I mast think he was at the botom of all our troubles, how basely he writs about us and has plan'd all the mischift that has Come upon us. I Say may he meet with his disarts."

Other Descriptive Information: Partly Illegible

No. 307 Chevalier de L'Eguille
1782 December 11 p.

Certification regarding the carrier of a letter [not present].

No. 308 Dr. Jacob Ehrenzeller to Henry Jackson
1778 October 11 p.

Reiterates his own complaint against Jackson's quartermaster for "Negligence of the Sick" and informs him that Ehrenzeller may have to transfer the sick to the general hospital at Providence, [R.I.].


Geographic Name(s): Providence, R.I.

No. 309 Samuel Elbert to Lachlan McIntosh
1777 April 242 p.

Encloses copies [not present] of letters and instructions from the President [Button Gwinett] and Council of Georgia that order Elbert to proceed on a "Southern Expedition," but because of "what passed between the President and [your]self," expresses astonishment at not hearing from McIntosh and requests instructions.

No. 310 Thomas Eliot to Matthew Bryant
1769 August 232 p.

Deed to two lots containing ten acres in Sandown; fon verso]: acknowledgment of the deed before Josiah Bartlett, 3 Oct. 1770; recorded 15 March 1771.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 311 William Ellery
1793 February 24, May 18, 1794 June 133 p.

Endorsements to three letters [not present].

No. 312 Andrew Elliot and the Magistrates of the Police to all whom it may concern
1780 July 211 p.

Pass for Rev. David Love to travel to Long Island via Brooklyn "and return occasionally."

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 313 Oliver Ellsworth to Rufus King
1801 March 192 p.

Order to pay Messrs. Lackington, Allen, and Company; [on verso]: request by Ellsworth that King send specified books.

Other Descriptive Information: See also no. 713

No. 314 Samuel Elmore to Benedict Arnold
1775 June 111 p.

Arranges a meeting.

No. 315 Roger Enos to Stephen R. Bradley
1802 March 103 p.

Discusses his own claim for "extra-provincial, or crown lands" that is based on eight years' service under the British in the French and Indian war and requests that Bradley enter a caveat in Enos's name.

No. 316 David Stewart Erskine, Lord Buchan to Tobias Lear?
1794 January 281 p.

Entrusts to his care for [George] Washington "a curious Original Ms. of Dr. Bryan Fairfax, our mutual kinsman, of the history of that Family."

No. 317 John Erving to Godfrey Malbone
1774 December 241 p.

Informs him about a loan that Erving made to John Hancock while the latter was in England, for which Hancock gave a mortgage as security for payment.

Other Descriptive Information: Copy

No. 318 Charles-Henri-Thedat, Comte d'Estaing to ________
1782 October 301 p.

Arranges a meeting in Bordeaux, [France]; includes certifications by [Pierre-Augustin] Caron de Beaumarchais and Le Zan, 1 July 1788.

Other Descriptive Information: See also no. 831

No. 319 Charles-Henri-Thedat, Comte d'Estaing to ________
1780? November 41 p.

Arranges a meeting in order to discuss the recipient's ideas.

No. 320 Thomas Etherington
1785 February 71 p.

Affidavit that between 24 Dec. 1783 and 25 Dec. 1784 he had no income under the King [George III] other than half-pay allowance as a reduced lieutenant in the Ninety-fourth Regiment of Foot; sworn before William Hyde; includes a certification by Etherington regarding the affidavit.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 321 James Ettredge
1800 June 242 p.

Affidavit that between 24 June and 25 Dec. 1799 he had no income under the King [George III] other than his military allowance as a Provincial officer; includes a certification by Charles Cooke, [n.d.], regarding the affidavit and a receipt, 15 Aug. 1800, related to same.

Other Descriptive Information: Printed form

No. 322 Samuel Everett to Luke Drury
1781 October 111 p.