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Subject

Social Life and Custom

MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
St. Andrew's Society of Philadelphia.
Dates:
1749-1843
Abstract:  

The minutes cover 1749-1776, 1786-1833, and Treasurer's accounts, 1759-1843.
Call #:  
Mss.361.Sa2
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Philadelphia Assembly.
Dates:
1748-1749
Abstract:  

This volume, kept by John Swift, the dancing association treasurer, also contains a record of Swift's personal expenses, 1747-1749.
Call #:  
Mss.974.811.P33a
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Wilson, James,1742-1798.
Dates:
1773-1786
Abstract:  

This is a volume of "Aitken's General American Register" for 1773, with entries dated 1774, and 1782-1786. The notes are in two different hands, and record receipts, expenses, and activities, the last probably not Wilson's.
Call #:  
Mss.B.W6915
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Vaughan Club
Dates:
1838-1841
Abstract:  

There are letters, songs, menus, etc. Members included William Strickland, N. Chapman, A. D. Bache, R. Dunglison, and others, who brought their bottles already decanted and ready to drink.
Call #:  
Mss.Temp5.Misc Ms
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Philological Society (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Dates:
1809-1811
Abstract:  

These papers consist chiefly of essays presented by the members, with such titles as "Ambition," "On Avarice," "State of Literature in the United States," and "Consequences of the French Revolution." Also included are several letters, including one from Benjamin Say, Jr.
Call #:  
Mss.405.P5o
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Hewson family.
Dates:
1767-1836
Abstract:  

These are letters of William Hewson, Mary Stevenson Hewson, and Thomas Tickell Hewson, chiefly to members of the family on personal affairs. There are also a transcript of a draft of William Hewson's account of his quarrel with Dr. William Hunter and a letter from Barbeu Du Bourg to Mary Stevenson Hewson.
Call #:  
Mss.B.H492.h, .br, .b1, .b
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Shippen, Edward, 1729-1806
Dates:
1754-1789
Abstract:  

These are receipts from tradesmen, mechanics, and storekeepers for sewing, carriage work, the making and repair of shoes, madeira, fabrics, sugar, hair-dressing, and clothing.
Call #:  
Mss.B.Sh621
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
State Penitentiary for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania
Dates:
1819-1955
Abstract:  

Intended as a model of Jacksonian penal reform, the Eastern State Penitentiary operated in the Cherry Hill section of Philadelphia between 1829 and 1970. Designed to promote the moral reform of prisoners by imposing a regimen of silent, solitary self-reflection, the penitentiary became the purest example of the "Pennsylvania plan" of "cellular isolation." The Records of the Eastern State Penitentiary consist of seven bound volumes and a series of miscellaneous records and correspondence that document aspects of life in Jacksonian America's model prison. The collection has been organized into four series: Series I, Bound Volumes; Series II, Miscellaneous Records; Series III, Correspondence of Elizabeth Velora Elwell; and Series IV, Prisoners' Correspondence. The bound volumes contain records of admission for prisoners between 1830 and 1892 (with some gaps), three of which were kept and annotated by the Moral Instructor at the prison, Thomas Larcombe. Larcombe provided interesting comments on the "moral state" of each prisoner, in addition to data on name, age, gender and race, religious affiliation, the charges, sentence, and final disposition. The unbound materials in the collection are diverse, but include an important 70 page manuscript comprising the records of the joint commission charged with investigating management of the prison in 1835, with a partial transcript of testimony, and a series of 29 letters written to or from prisoners at Eastern State, 1845-1871, most unusually the inmate Elizabeth Velora Elwell, writing to her paramour and fellow inmate Albert Green Jackson.
Call #:  
Mss.365.P381p
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Franklin, Benjamin, 1706-1790
Dates:
1749-1898
Abstract:  

The James S. and Frances M. Bradford Collection contains a wealth of letters to and from Polly Stevenson Hewson, intimate friend of Benjamin Franklin. At the heart of the collection are approximately 40 letters from Mary Stevenson to Franklin with a smaller number in return. Friendly, increasingly intimate, these provide a glimpse of the domestic life of Franklin and his warm personal relations with the Stevensons and Hewsons. Among the noteworthy individual items is the manuscript "Craven Street Gazette" (Sept. 22-26, 1770), the mock newspaper Franklin produced while in London. The collection also contains a series of unrelated miscellaneous manuscripts that includes correspondence from William Bradford, Patrick Henry, and George Washington.
Call #:  
Mss.B.F85.bra
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Moore, Ira.
Dates:
1848-1856
Abstract:  

These papers include letters from relatives, friends, and former students, chiefly on family affairs, social events, and schools in Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. Also included are receipts for personal expenditures, and letters of recommendation for teaching positions and from J. P. Lesley for admission to Yale College, where Moore received the Ph.B. degree in 1855. Moore was Lesley's assistant in preparing the Pennsylvania Railroad maps of western Pennsylvania.
Call #:  
Mss.B.M79
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Rush, Julia Stockton, 1759-1848
Dates:
1776-1809
Abstract:  

Letters written by Julia Rush, wife of Benjamin Rush, mainly to her husband, with one to Samuel Stockton and one to Mary Rush. Eight letters were written during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic. The letters are not included in Lyman Butterfield's edition of Benjamin Rush's letters, vol. 30 of APS Memoirs (1951).
Call #:  
Mss.B.R894
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Rush, Samuel,1795-1859.
Dates:
1824
Abstract:  

In this volume Rush comments on persons and events of the time, mentioning Robert Walsh, John Vaughan, Lafayette, James Rush, Peter S. Du Ponceau, and William Currie. Rush also comments on the Franklin Institute, and the American Philosophical Society.
Call #:  
Mss.B.R895.o
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Short, William (1759-1849)
Dates:
1787-1838
Abstract:  

This correspondence is chiefly of a personal nature between Short and Alexandrine Charlotte de Rohan-Chabot, the Duchesse de La Rochefoucauld, concerning his desire to marry her and bring her to America. The Duchesse's letters describe life in a powerful, wealthy, and noble French family under the ancien régime, including events of the Revolution and the Reign of Terror, and life in France thereafter. The collection also includes letters from Lafayette, Count Luigi Castiglioni, Pauline Castiglioni, and the Duc de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt.
Call #:  
Mss.B.Sh83
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Gibson, Elizabeth Bordley, 1777-1863
Dates:
1795-1863
Abstract:  

Providing a glimpse in to the private life of a genteel lady in the early republic, the Elizabeth Bordley Gibson Papers consist of over 200 letters and notes written during the years 1795 to 1863. The bulk of the letters cover the period 1848-1863, and involve Gibson's correspondence with members of her extended family. Elizabeth was related to the influential Bordley, Mifflin, and Shippen families, three of the more prominent families in colonial and early republic Pennsylvania and Maryland. Most of the correspondence in the collection comprises letters between Elizabeth Bordley Gibson and her cousin Edward Shippen and her nieces Elizabeth Mifflin, Anne C. Ross, and Elizabeth Stump. Complementing other early American history collections at APS, the Gibson Papers offers important insights in to women's history and the history of influential mid-Atlantic families in nineteenth-century America.
Call #:  
Mss.SMs.Coll.30
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Pemberton, Israel, 1715-1779
Dates:
1744-1747
Abstract:  

This volume contains letters relating to the purchase and shipment of goods in America, Europe, and the West Indies, commecing 22d, 12mo. 1744, ending 6th, 2mo. 1747. Some are signed by Matthias Aspden, John Reynell, and John Smith.
Call #:  
Mss.380.P36
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Day, Sherman,1806-1884.
Dates:
Circa 1842
Abstract:  

These are the original sketches used for the engravings in Day's 1843 publication, "Historical Collections of the State of Pennsylvania" (Philadelphia). They are finely detailed renderings of public and private structures and landscape throughout Pennsylvania. Accompanying these sketches are 150 pages of photocopied letters of Day, from originals at Yale University. These were used by Smith in his book.
Call #:  
Mss.917.48.D33
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Bache, Sarah Franklin, 1743-1808
Dates:
1768-1807
Abstract:  

Sarah Franklin Bache (1743-1808), a Revolutionary War patriot and daughter of Benjamin Franklin, led an active public life according to the standards of womanhood in the late eighteenth century. As the daughter of Benjamin Franklin she had an unusual access, for a woman, to the political life in revolutionary Philadelphia. Although her primary role was of caretaker of her family and home, Bache played an active role in the Revolution through her relief work and as her father's political hostess. The Sarah Franklin Bache papers consist of incoming and outgoing correspondence ranging from 1768 to 1807 mostly of a personal nature to and from friends and relatives. The correspondence of her relatives includes her nephew William Temple Franklin, her brother William Franklin and her children.
Call #:  
Mss.B.B1245
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Evans, Harriet Verena, 1782-
Dates:
1827-1844
Abstract:  

Harriet Verena Evans was born in Lancaster, Pa., on April 28, 1782, the daughter of John and Sarah Musser. On May 21, 1807, Harriet married Cadwalader Evans (1762-1841), a former surveyor who went on to a distinguished career in politics, as one of the directors of the Bank of the United States, a promoter of the Schuylkill Canal, and president of the Schuylkill Navigation Company. The couple had nine children, including a set of twins. The diary of Harriet Verena Evans is an unusual example of a woman's spiritual diary from early national Philadelphia. Beginning on her 46th birthday in 1827, the same day her seventeen year-old son John died, Evans made sporadic entries in her diary for seventeen years, marking birthdays, holidays, special events, and anniversaries of various kinds. Fixated upon praying (or fretting) over her spiritual state and future, Evans continued to mourn over John's loss for many years, remembering him regularly on the date of his birth, death, and burial. She was also particularly prone to composing (or copying) religious poetry, and in sections, the diary verges on a poetical commonplace book. Other entries reveal Evans' concern for her other children, three of whom were students at the University of Pennsylvania, and on July 25, 1832, she made a particularly long entry discussing the arrival of the cholera in Philadelphia.
Call #:  
Mss.B.Ev5
Extent:
1 Volumes



MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION

Creator:
Hiltzheimer, Jacob, 1729?-1798
Dates:
1765-1798
Abstract:  

Jacob Hiltzheimer, farmer and assemblyman, emigrated from Germany to Philadelphia in 1748 and lead a moderately active political and social life. He was a successful farmer and raised select livestock in the city of Philadelphia. He also boarded horses including those of John Penn and George Washington. He served in the Pennsylvania Assembly for 11 consecutive years beginning in 1786. He was an active contributor in civil affairs and took a remarkable enthusiastic interest in events, in persons, and in every day life all of which he wrote down in his diary. As a result of his Revolutionary War and political acquaintances his contacts were numerous. Hiltzheimer's record of social affairs are for the most part routine daily events such as buying and trading horses, attending barbecues and funerals, and drinking punch. However it is his every day accounts that also records significant events such as the Revolutionary War, transactions of the Pennsylvania Assembly, and Philadelphia's yellow fever epidemics, as well as the dealings of significant people including George Washington, Thomas Mifflin, and John Hancock.
Call #:  
Mss.B.H56d
Extent:
28 Volumes



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